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SparrowHawk7 04-22-2007 09:35 PM

Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Since I have decided to do a series of Civil War portraits, JayD suggested I do all in a single thread in order to keep them all together.

I'll start out with a Medal of Honor recipient for his actions on July 2, 1863. More on that as it progresses. Here is about 5 hours of work .. there are many things that need a bit of tweaking here. It is a rather difficult angle as well, but I'll pull it out in the end. The hair is simply something to top his head but isn't anywhere near done as yet. You're going to LOVE the mustache when I get to it.


Joshua Chamberlain was a professor of rhetoric at Bowdoin College in Maine when the war broke out. He was married but had no children. As the war unfolded he wished to enlist but the college refused to allow it. He then applied for a sabatical to study language which was granted and he promptly enlisted in the 20th Maine Infantry Regiment. He was offer the colonelcy but wanted to start lower and learn the job so he started as a lieutenant colonel.

His regiment was assigned to the V Corps of the Army of the Potomac and he saw action in the Battle of Fredericksburg in December, spending a miserable night in freezing cold huddled between dead bodies to protect him from snipers. He missed the winter campaign and Chancellorsville but was on hand in June of 1862 when Lee invaded Maryland for the second time. By then he was the Colonel of the 20th Maine ... and his hour was fast approaching.

Ken

drulf 04-22-2007 09:52 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Good beginning. Chamberlain is one of my personal favorites; he was a fascinating and complex person.

I'm pulling up a chair to watch this one.

alfredart 04-22-2007 09:58 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Good start Ken, I'll be watching. Oh my, what have I started. :evil:

Peace,
AL

SparrowHawk7 04-22-2007 10:05 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Thank you Don. He certainly lived an interesting life ... and, like so many of his contemporaries, had a great sense of duty and honor. Have you ever read any of his books? They are somewhat flowery, but that was the style of the day. I have always liked "The Passing of the Armies" about the grand review in DC.

Thanks Al. Yep ... another monster is born. :). But it makes sense to keep everything together and holds down the number of open threads. Plus, if someone is interested in my style or this series, once subscribed they'll be notified whenever a new one is begun. Somehow it seems like someone is always showing up at the end of a drawing and saying that they almost missed it .. this helps ameliorate that.

Thanks for looking,
Ken

Indyviews 04-22-2007 10:05 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Count me in also..I am going to enjoy this!

An after thought....it would be nice if you changed the title of your last drawing and it could be the first of this series.

drulf 04-22-2007 10:44 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SparrowHawk7
Have you ever read any of his books? They are somewhat flowery, but that was the style of the day. I have always liked "The Passing of the Armies" about the grand review in DC.


I read "The Passing of the Armies" several years ago and enjoyed it, despite the flowery prose. Nearly lost among the long list of Chamberlain's accomplishments was his support of Gouverneur Warren after Sheridan (with Grant's approval) made the man a scapegoat for Five Forks. It took a lot of courage to do that, Grant and Sheridan being the heros of the day. Still, in fairness to Grant, Warren should never have gotten promoted to Corps command. Very few people could do the job well, and he wasn't one of them. (The same could be said for many Union generals.)

jlukach 04-22-2007 11:23 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
:thumbsup: Ken when you and Al quit bickering, I'll be glad to pull up stools to both your bars and get high on the stuff you guys are producing. WOW what a trip.

Jim

nancyl746 04-23-2007 12:43 AM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
I'll be watching this one too

SparrowHawk7 04-23-2007 07:45 AM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Welcome Steve. You're right ... Lee certainly deserves to be a part of this, but once the thread is set I'm not sure it could be changed. However, here's the link to that thread if anybody wants to check it out the development of this.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=413705


Don, Ah .. another buff. Chamberlain certainly had quite a career, both as a soldier and a civilian. As for Five Forks, we've got to take the personality of Sheridan into account. He was Grant's fair haired boy, but this was also the man who said "the only good indian, is a dead indian". I'm sure he was a VERY difficult man to be around ... constant drive and no excuses for anybody not doing precisely what he wanted them to do not to mention the fact that his opinion was never to be questioned. In his defense, however, he was brilliantly effective on the battlefield. But, you are also right to say Warren was not suited to higher command. The attrition of that war brought many men to levels beyond their abilities. Take Ewell for instance. He was one of Lees very best division commanders (or APHill for that matter), but loses forced both those men into commands for which they were patently unsuited. Ewell became confused and inactive (although he had also lost a leg by then), AP Hill suffered probably from ulcers and was often ill and not able to command. The North had this problem from the beginning - Burnside comes to mind. With the loss in line officers in any battle so high, few had much time to acclimate themselves to their new command before being pushed even higher. It's no wonder so many were ill equipped when they might have been OK had things moved more slowly.

I have forgotten the details of the incident, but Chamberlain's reputation was such that he could absorb pretty much anything and still remain practically above reproach not to mention it's pretty hard to blame a medal of honor winner with dereliction of duty - no matter who you are. Not only that, but he was so well liked and respected.

Jim, glad to have you aboard. The art will be my usual, but the conversation should be interesting as well. :thumbsup:

And Nance, there's plenty of room left. Glad to see you.

Ken

Smokindevil 04-23-2007 09:53 AM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
I'm sett'n up camp for this one!!:thumbsup: You've got a great start here both artistically and historically. Do you have a plans as to how many you are going to do for this series?

SparrowHawk7 04-23-2007 10:16 AM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Welcome Chris. I've got no idea how many this series will entail. There are hundreds of decent images. Most of them are either torso or full body shots so I crop back to just the head/shoulders. There is a market for this stuff which I'd like to tap into so the more I have to offer, the better my chances. With that in mind, there could be quite a few of these.

joane 04-23-2007 11:34 AM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Will be along for this journey (I followed Al's series too) into history as well--fascinating portraits and historical notes! Would love to see them in books!

SparrowHawk7 04-23-2007 02:26 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Glad to have you, Joane

drulf 04-23-2007 04:10 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SparrowHawk7
Chamberlain certainly had quite a career, both as a soldier and a civilian.

Amen to that!

Quote:

Originally Posted by SparrowHawk7
Take Ewell for instance. He was one of Lees very best division commanders

Actually, Ewell did come to mind earlier. He had the added burden of living in the fallen Jackson's shadow. No way could he ever get out from underneath it.

SparrowHawk7 04-23-2007 04:30 PM

Re: Civil War Portraits - The Series
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by drulf
Actually, Ewell did come to mind earlier. He had the added burden of living in the fallen Jackson's shadow. No way could he ever get out from underneath it.

Without Ewell and AP Hill, that left Longstreet as the right hand man. And he played that part admirably even when he disagreed. He was first and foremost a soldier who took orders and did his best to carry them out. He will be one of the portraits in this series but none of the photos I've seen of him are particularly good or clear. I'm going to concentrate on the better photos first.


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