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DAK723
12-31-2011, 08:46 PM
Welcome artists! :clap:

Here is a quick recap of what The Spotlight is all about!

The Spotlight is an activity thread for pastel artists of all experience levels working from photos chosen by a monthly host. Most months, the host will choose photos from only one subject, putting that subject into “the spotlight,” so to speak! For example, one month the subject will be painting water, another month will spotlight flowers, etc.

Some months, rather than spotlight a subject, the focus will be on a challenge of some sort. In those cases, we might have a wider variety of photo references, but “the spotlight” will be on the challenge itself.

Since this is a group activity, we can pool our knowledge and resources, and grow as artists in a fun, “no-pressure” atmosphere. And no critiques unless specifically asked for. The intent is to have fun, try new things, experiment, and perhaps most of all, to see what our friends and colleagues are painting from the same reference material!

Please note: The photos this month are taken by me, or are from the Reference Image Library. You have permission to use the photos as reference to create your artwork and to sell them and/or exhibit them. The actual photos still retain the copyright of the photographer. So you cannot copy the photo to your blog, for example, without the permission of the photographer, or digitally alter or reproduce the photo for any purpose other than for your personal use, with the exception of crops, digital alterations and posts of these photos within "The Spotlight" thread.

This month’s Spotlight is on…Shadows!

An entire book could probably be written about painting shadows, but I will try to restrain myself and keep it as brief as possible! :lol: As usual, this Spotlight will contain many of my own observations, as well as things I’ve learned over the years. Always keep in mind that your observations may differ and that there are many ways to do things when it comes to art!

When we talk about shadows in art, we are referring to any part of the scene that does not receive direct light from the main light source. This includes both the shadowed parts of objects and cast shadows.

On a very basic level, I usually follow the principle that shadows are a darker and duller version of the color in the light. So a banana or a yellow flower might be a nice bright yellow in the light and a darker, duller yellow (in other words – a dull brown) in the shadow. It doesn’t have to be exactly the same color yellow – but in the general yellow family.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-00-yellow.jpg

The top color sample is in the direct light, the bottom sample is in the shadow. Notice the middle swatch – this is just before the light turns to shadow and is often the area of the most intense color.

But even though the shadow sides of objects and cast shadows don’t receive direct light, there is almost always some additional source of light that illuminates shadows to a certain degree. Secondary sources of light can be the sky, additional artificial lights, and light reflecting off nearby walls, ceilings, objects, etc.

So let’s revise our basic shadow principle: Shadows are a darker and duller version of the color in the light, plus the colors that are introduced into the shadows by a secondary light source and/or by reflected light from nearby surfaces or objects.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-00-shadow-colors_path.jpg

In the above photo we see that the grass in the sunshine is a yellowish green. The grass in shadow is a darker green, but more on the bluish side due to the effect of a secondary light source – the blue sky. The path might be categorized as gray, but in the sun it is a warm (almost pinkish) gray. In the shadow it is a blue gray, again because of the blue sky light shining into the shadow. Just so we don’t think it is all just a formula, I included a swatch from the more diffuse shadow near the walkers. That shadow must be getting a bit of diffuse sunlight, so it is warmer in color (little or no blue) than the darker shadow and not as dark.

Notice that shadows are essentially transparent, so where the one large shadow shape goes from the path to the grass, it changes color – because the surfaces that it falls on are different colors.

Even though I have used color swatches in the above examples, I would like to emphasize that I don’t think it is necessary to try to match colors exactly – or even particularly closely. Art is not just about scientific accuracy, it is about personal expression. And the use of color is one of the best ways for an artist to express themselves! In my opinion, when it comes to representational art, values and colors need to be believable, not necessarily 100% scientifically accurate.

Here are some more observations about shadows:

A cast shadow is darkest and has the sharpest edges the closer it is to the casting object. The cast shadow will lighten and its edges will become more diffuse as the distance increases, as we can see below:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-00-shadow.jpg

The value difference between light and shadow decreases as objects become more distant due to the effects of atmospheric perspective, as demonstrated by the paired swatches below:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-greens-clearday.JPG

On a hazy or foggy day with more atmosphere to see through, the effect is even greater. The value difference between light and shadow become negligible and the objects become silhouettes within a shorter distance.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-00-_greens-hazy2.jpg

The above two photos also shows that the value difference between light and shadow is greater when the light source is strong and direct, as opposed to diffuse. Here’s another example:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-00-shadows_compare_hazy.jpg

I know, you can’t see the sky in these pics, so you’ll have to take my word for it that it was very sunny with a clear blue sky on the left, and more diffuse sunlight shining through some high clouds on the right. Notice also how much more blue the shadow is on the clear day! So even though we can’t see the sky, we can tell by the shadows which day was clearer/hazier and what the color of the sky was!

Apparently, there is a fair amount of light “bouncing” off the clouds, the snow (and perhaps other things) to add subtle differences in color and value within the shadow. This effect helps make the shadow appear transparent because we can still see subtle details and changes in the planes of the surface. But those differences in value are much smaller than the difference in value between the light and shadow, so those “lighter” areas within the shadow still easily read as part of the shadow. If you squint, those subtle differences will disappear and the shadow will appear as one shadow shape.

Here are a few examples from one of the greatest painters of shadow and light (in my opinion) – Joaquin Sorolla.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-02-sorolla1.jpg

Here is a blow-up:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-02-sorolla1-det.jpg

A couple things I notice:

As the shadow goes from #1 to #3, notice how the color and value of the shadow changes depending on the color and value of the object that it appears on.

I see some wonderful touches of reflected light including the small touch of skin tone reflecting on her clothing just to the left of the #4, some sand color just under the #1, as well subtle touches of both warm and cool colors throughout all the shadows.

Again these color and value changes within the shadow are very subtle so that the shadow shape still appears to be one shadow shape, not a bunch of smaller shapes. The shadow colors are also not intense, but stay duller than the colors in light.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-03-sorolla.jpg

I picked this example for the shadow across the sandy beach. Look at that variety of colors! Blues reflecting from the sky along with some rich dark earth colors, too! Also some purples and some of the blue-greens of the water are mixed in, as well. Are all those color really reflecting into the shadows? Maybe – or maybe not, but you can usually add some hints of other colors that you use in your painting to the shadows to help balance and unify the painting as a whole! Remember, it’s a painting, not science!

And once again, the differences in value and color intensity are subtle so that the shadow reads as one shape. Again, if you squint, the shadow shape should be clearly unified as one shape.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-04-sorolla.jpg

Here is a wonderful example of reflected light on the man’s left sleeve. Notice the brown/orange color in the shadow of the upper sleeve – reflecting that yellow-orange color of the wall behind him. Also notice the green reflected light within the shadow around the elbow – reflecting the green that appears just below.

A word of caution….

Most painting books and art instructors urge caution when it comes to the topic of reflected light. They often mention that it can become so much fun to start including it that the painter overdoes it – using too much reflected light and, more importantly, making it too noticeable. Usually the reflected light is not the main subject of the painting, so some restraint may be necessary! So, most instructors will advise (as I have done over and over… :wave:) to make sure the reflected light is subtle and blends in with the entire shadow by keeping all the shadow values fairly close and making sure the reflected light color is not too intense, and by avoiding hard edges within the shadow. While sometimes in reality the reflected light may seem considerably lighter in value than the rest of the shadow, it is usually recommended to keep the value of the reflected light closer to the value of the rest of the shadow. Otherwise you can fragment your shadow into too many scattered shapes. So, when it comes to reflected light, it is just like many other aspects of art, it is up to you to decide when to use it…and when not to.

One other word about light and shadow. The emphasis that we give to the light areas and the shadow areas will vary from painting to painting. In many cases, the areas in the light are the main areas of emphasis, with the shadows playing a minor or secondary role. It might be a good idea in those circumstances to keep the shadows simpler. Other times, as in the first Sorolla example, most of the painting is about the shadows (or so it seems to me) with only a few patches of sunlight on the women’s clothing. Since more emphasis is on the shadows, most of the color variety is within the shadows rather than the lights. While this is definitely not a rule, it is sometimes a good idea to decide whether the light areas or the shadow areas are going to get a greater variety of colors. Putting lots of colors in both the light areas and the shadows might make the painting too busy – and in some sense – is not what the eye sees. For example, if we look at a barn in sunlight, we may see lots of colors and values on the sunlit side, but an open barn door may look like a very dark hole with no detail or color/value variation within. But if we concentrate on that doorway and focus there, our eyes open wider and we begin to see details and subtle variations in color and value within that opening. However, when we do, the light areas outside that doorway get simplified. We can not see a lot of detail and color/value variation in both light and shadow areas at the same time - at least that is how some artists approach this subject. Again, it’s not a rule by any means, but perhaps something to think about.

OK, a few more comments on that last Sorolla painting! I think this painting is a great example of how the use of reflected light helps place the objects you are painting – in this case, the man - into the scene as a whole. The objects in the painting are related to one another. I am sure we have all seen paintings where each object seems to be painted in isolation – and then brought together into one composition. They often look pasted on. But in reality, every part of the painting is connected and interrelated by the color of the various light sources. And this includes secondary and reflected light!

Here is a little set up that demonstrates this further. Each photo is the same except for a vertical piece of colored mat board that reflects the light back into the scene. Notice how that reflected light affects the shadow colors (and even the white flat surface). These objects are all subtly connected by the color of the reflected light and the resulting image is more unified.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-01-shadows_diff_colors.jpg


James Gurney is a great artist with a popular blog that gets mentioned frequently here on WC. He has done a number of blogs on light and shadow and here are a few links:

For a more detailed description of all the various parts of light and shadow on a sphere:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2010/02/light-and-form-part-1_15.html

And more on shadows:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2010/02/light-and-form-part-2.html

Diffused light on a sphere:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2010/02/light-and-form-part-3.html

Reflected light in shadow:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2008/07/croquet-balls.html

Vertical surfaces in shadow:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2011/09/vertical-surfaces-in-shadow.html

For a rather detailed description of dappled light and shadow:

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2008/03/dappled-light.html

One quote from the Gurney blogs sums it up well: "Within the shadow is not darkness but the effect of other, weaker sources."

This Spotlight is a companion piece to one that we did last April – The Color of Light, which can be found here:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=927533

That thread is closed, so you can’t add new posts to the thread, but the information may be of interest.


The references will be in the next post…

DAK723
12-31-2011, 08:54 PM
And now, the references….

Keep in mind that photos have some shortcomings – especially when it comes to shadows. As is often discussed, the value range of photos is limited, so that if the light areas are properly exposed, then the shadows will be too dark – and often black.

Photos also have trouble differentiating subtle colors changes. So there are usually subtle colors that the camera just doesn’t capture – especially within the shadows.

All that being said, we have no choice but to offer photo references. In some cases (with apologies to the photographers) I have lightened the shadows for our use here in the Spotlight!

Reference photo by me

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-05-ref1.jpg


Photo by SweetBaby3

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-05-ref2_by_SweetBaby3.jpg


Photo by mustcreate

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-05-ref3_by_mustcreate.jpg


Photo by madmum

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-05-ref4_by_madmum.jpg


Photo by jspatton

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-05-ref5_by_jspatton.jpg


Photo by CHClements

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-05-ref7_by_CHClements.jpg


Photo by mustcreate

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Dec-2011/82335-05-ref8_by_mustcreate.jpg


Remember, feel free to crop, rearrange, and change the references any way you want in your paintings. Post your paintings, experiments, questions and observations about shadows here in this thread!

Happy Painting…and Happy New Year! :clap:

Don

chuas2
12-31-2011, 09:03 PM
Ah, thank you Don, for another great lesson, beautiful references! The lilies are calla-ing me. Happy New Year to you!
Kris

robertsloan2
12-31-2011, 09:56 PM
What a glorious lesson and beautiful set of challenge photos. This is going to be fun! Thank you!

mij
01-01-2012, 03:16 AM
I agree, what a lesson and references!
Thanks very much Don.
I will have to do my best with these this month.
cheers
jim

Colorix
01-01-2012, 09:43 AM
Wonderful lesson, Don, thank you so much for all the work!

In the last example in the lesson part, with the two similar pics with different bg, there is one phenomenon that is really cool, and recently I found the explanation for it.
The penumbra (diffused edge) of the cast shadows are warmer in colour than the cast shadow itself, regardless of the colour of the bg. That is due to the fact that the light in the red/orange part of the spectrum has longer wavelengths, and gets spread out more into the shadow as it passes the object. It works as if it "turns around the corner" a bit more than the light in the blue end of the spectrum (which goes more straight due to shorter wavelengths).

spirothet
01-01-2012, 09:56 AM
Don, you out did yourself. This is a great lesson on shadows. I hope I can do justice to the super reference photos. Thanks, Cali

Judibelle
01-01-2012, 10:21 AM
wow! Another great lesson, and inspiringly beautiful photos, Don.
Will try to do several this month...

robertsloan2
01-01-2012, 10:54 AM
Charlie, you're right! Once again the Master of Colour gives me another interesting light and colour trick to remember!

CM Neidhofer
01-01-2012, 12:17 PM
Awesome refs! One of my goals in the Goalpost...participate in the Spotlight!

Carmel Campbell
01-01-2012, 12:25 PM
This is a wonderful lesson. I will go back and read it again later today. I do have a question regarding painting shadows with pastels. I come from the world of colored pencil. I would always reach the the complimentary of a color to create the darker tones. I noted on your examples, especially the samples of yellow, you are were using different values of yellow. I still get confused between these two mediums. Things can get gray fairly quickly when I start playing with a complimentary color for my dark tones with pastels. So should I be focusing on using different values in a color family than complimentary colors or does it depend on the subject matter? I hope it is ok to ask here, my question relates to shadows. Thank you again for the wonderful lesson.

mollerman
01-01-2012, 12:33 PM
Fabulous lesson on Shadows Don. Very good challenge!

goeppeka
01-01-2012, 01:09 PM
Thank you so much for the detailed information about shadows and the wonderful pictures of paintings by Sorolla. Thank you for the work you put in there, Don.
And a happy New Year to everybody of course! :)

gakinme
01-01-2012, 01:09 PM
Don, thank you for the detailed lesson. That photo reference of the different color and shade of distant foliage is so revealing. I have always wondered how to color distant foliage convincingly in gradation. Now I see the difference in contrasts from your chart! Thank you!!!

DAK723
01-01-2012, 01:17 PM
Thank you all for your very nice comments!

In the last example in the lesson part, with the two similar pics with different bg, there is one phenomenon that is really cool, and recently I found the explanation for it.
The penumbra (diffused edge) of the cast shadows are warmer in colour than the cast shadow itself, regardless of the colour of the bg. That is due to the fact that the light in the red/orange part of the spectrum has longer wavelengths, and gets spread out more into the shadow as it passes the object. It works as if it "turns around the corner" a bit more than the light in the blue end of the spectrum (which goes more straight due to shorter wavelengths).

Thanks Charlie for the additional information! Good to know!

Don

DAK723
01-01-2012, 02:10 PM
This is a wonderful lesson. I will go back and read it again later today. I do have a question regarding painting shadows with pastels. I come from the world of colored pencil. I would always reach the the complimentary of a color to create the darker tones. I noted on your examples, especially the samples of yellow, you are were using different values of yellow. I still get confused between these two mediums. Things can get gray fairly quickly when I start playing with a complimentary color for my dark tones with pastels. So should I be focusing on using different values in a color family than complimentary colors or does it depend on the subject matter? I hope it is ok to ask here, my question relates to shadows. Thank you again for the wonderful lesson.

The question of darkening with complementary colors is a very good one. I see many folks mention this as their method of darkening. Personally, I have seen many ways mentioned as ways to darken, so it is often very much a personal decision. In my opinion, adding complements is primarily a method to neutralize or gray down a color. Since the shadow color is normally duller, adding some of the compliment to neutralize the intensity might be a good alternative. But neutralizing a color too much is not always the best alternative, and that's what can happen when using complements. As with most things pigment related, different combination can yield very different results. Some complements make grays quickly, others never make a true gray and will retain more of one or the other color. Nor do some complements (green and red, and their neighboring colors on the color wheel) darken one another particularly well as they are similar in value. So, even though it is one of those oft repeated art sayings, "Darkening with complements" is not really a good formula for all occasions, in my opinion. Sometimes it may work well, but often times not. I prefer to think of complements as neutralizers, as opposed to darkeners, although they can do both.

At the furthest extreme, I have read a couple books that say to never use complements to mix darker shadow colors. Ted Goerschner, in one of his books, says to "Shadow analogously around the color wheel instead of complementarily." He recommend moving only one or two hues around on the color wheel to create darker mixtures whenever possible - never going all the way around the color wheel to the complement. Colors mixed with more adjacent colors on the wheel will usually stay more vibrant and intense. Of course, this "formula" may not be what you want, either, if you need a less vibrant shadow color!

So, I think it is best to avoid "formulas" and look at each situation in its own context. With the yellow flowers from the lesson, I would try to find a brown/ochre color for the shadow. If I apply it and it seems too bright, then I might add a small touch of blue or violet to cool it down or neutralize it. Using a touch of a cool color is often a good idea to contrast with the warm yellow in sunlight. Or, instead of the cool color, I might use a very dull brown like burnt ochre to neutralize and darken further. In many cases their are many ways to get to the color you ultimately want.

Luckily with pastels, we can often find an appropriate pastel and may not have to mix colors at all - or if we do, it is much simpler than mixing with only a handful of tubes as when using oils or acrylics. Many pastels are sold in groups or families with values ranging from light to dark.

I would think pastels and colored pastels would be fairly similar in application, with the possible exception that pastels are more opaque. Also if you physically blend the colors together, they will lose their "sparkle" and will combine to make a new color. This is especially true with the softer brands. I find the medium to harder brands are easier to mix as you can cross hatch and layer without blending the colors completely and keep them more transparent. Perhaps this is more like colored pencils.

Hope this helps!

Winny Kerr
01-01-2012, 04:30 PM
This is a valuable lesson and I am really going to give it a go this year.....and start NOW..... Thanks Don for hosting.

Dougwas
01-01-2012, 04:49 PM
Great lesson on shadows, Don. I could look at all those beautiful colors in the shadows of the paintings for hours. I can't wait to get at it. It will be very interesting to see what everybody comes up with.

Doug

Carmel Campbell
01-01-2012, 08:20 PM
The question of darkening with complementary colors is a very good one. I see many folks mention this as their method of darkening. Personally, I have seen many ways mentioned as ways to darken, so it is often very much a personal decision. In my opinion, adding complements is primarily a method to neutralize or gray down a color. Since the shadow color is normally duller, adding some of the compliment to neutralize the intensity might be a good alternative. But neutralizing a color too much is not always the best alternative, and that's what can happen when using complements. As with most things pigment related, different combination can yield very different results. Some complements make grays quickly, others never make a true gray and will retain more of one or the other color. Nor do some complements (green and red, and their neighboring colors on the color wheel) darken one another particularly well as they are similar in value. So, even though it is one of those oft repeated art sayings, "Darkening with complements" is not really a good formula for all occasions, in my opinion. Sometimes it may work well, but often times not. I prefer to think of complements as neutralizers, as opposed to darkeners, although they can do both.

At the furthest extreme, I have read a couple books that say to never use complements to mix darker shadow colors. Ted Goerschner, in one of his books, says to "Shadow analogously around the color wheel instead of complementarily." He recommend moving only one or two hues around on the color wheel to create darker mixtures whenever possible - never going all the way around the color wheel to the complement. Colors mixed with more adjacent colors on the wheel will usually stay more vibrant and intense. Of course, this "formula" may not be what you want, either, if you need a less vibrant shadow color!

So, I think it is best to avoid "formulas" and look at each situation in its own context. With the yellow flowers from the lesson, I would try to find a brown/ochre color for the shadow. If I apply it and it seems too bright, then I might add a small touch of blue or violet to cool it down or neutralize it. Using a touch of a cool color is often a good idea to contrast with the warm yellow in sunlight. Or, instead of the cool color, I might use a very dull brown like burnt ochre to neutralize and darken further. In many cases their are many ways to get to the color you ultimately want.

Luckily with pastels, we can often find an appropriate pastel and may not have to mix colors at all - or if we do, it is much simpler than mixing with only a handful of tubes as when using oils or acrylics. Many pastels are sold in groups or families with values ranging from light to dark.

I would think pastels and colored pastels would be fairly similar in application, with the possible exception that pastels are more opaque. Also if you physically blend the colors together, they will lose their "sparkle" and will combine to make a new color. This is especially true with the softer brands. I find the medium to harder brands are easier to mix as you can cross hatch and layer without blending the colors completely and keep them more transparent. Perhaps this is more like colored pencils.

Hope this helps!

Don, thank you for answering my question. It does help. I am fairly new to pastels. I wish I had waited a little longer before I went ahead and purchased some of my pastels. I am fast discovering having a full value range of one color is a real plus. I have set up my palette according color, value and temperature. So I can see what is missing in my palette. I just need to stay focused and get what I need :)

Once again thank you for the wonderful thread and answering my question.

johndill01
01-02-2012, 11:15 AM
Don, thanks for starting this discussion. There is much to be learned about shadows in all paintings. This past fall, I had the pleasure of attending a Lorenzo Chavez workshop. One bright sunny morning, Lorenzo assembled the workshop out in the bright sunshine and at least partially out of the cold wind that was blowing, to discuss and show how observations of the shadows was essential to painting an accurate depiction of the subject. Among the many things discussed was the reflected lights in shadows and how they would change as the size and color of the reflective source changed. Then to cap off the demonstration, a long shadow cast by a light pole was studied as it fell across the reddish color of the mulch around the base of the pole, then the color change as the shadow fell across a concrete sidewalk and then fell on still green grass. It was interesting to really see and understand that shadows are not one solid color as they move across the landscape. The underlying theory that darker colors of the local color are more appropriate is IMHO well borne out by close observation. This observation is (I think) even more critical as we paint from photos, to know that the shadow is color and not necessarily as dark or black as the photo indicates.

Again thanks for directing this month's discussions. I am looking forward to learning much from this series.

John

Greenbrier33
01-02-2012, 02:53 PM
Charlie,

Wow ... "penumbra (diffused edge) of the cast shadows are warmer in colour than the cast shadow itself,".

Now, if I can only actualize that phenomenon in a painting. I will try.

beetee
01-02-2012, 04:25 PM
Plenty to study here,thanks,will read it properly when I can fully concentrate.

Brian

757jewelry
01-02-2012, 05:35 PM
The penumbra (diffused edge) of the cast shadows are warmer in colour than the cast shadow itself, regardless of the colour of the bg. That is due to the fact that the light in the red/orange part of the spectrum has longer wavelengths, and gets spread out more into the shadow as it passes the object. It works as if it "turns around the corner" a bit more than the light in the blue end of the spectrum (which goes more straight due to shorter wavelengths).

Awesome physics lesson! I'm an Earth Science teacher and I wanted to define penumbra real quick with a photo just in case there's any confusion...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jan-2012/64952-shadows.jpg

It's the umbra of the moon and earth that are responsible for the eclipses that we observe on earth. Knowing the parts of the shadow from my studies in science have helped me draw and paint more accurately. :D

I hope to paint Don's tulips sometime this month. Those warm colors called to me this time... Thanks so much for all the great shadow info!

cristiona
01-02-2012, 10:56 PM
Great overview of shadows. I particularly liked the demonstration of the reflected colors. Thank you for that!

DAK723
01-03-2012, 08:47 AM
Thanks everybody for your comments!

Thanks Brittany for your graphic definition of penumbra and umbra!

Don

Colorix
01-03-2012, 10:48 AM
Love it when you guys talk science! :-) Thanks a lot, Brittany!

Umbra -- Latin for "shadow", generally meaning a full shadow, where the light from the primary light source is blocked by the object that casts the shadow.

Penumbra -- where "pen-" is from Latin 'paene', meaning "almost", "nearly". (Compare with "penultimate".) In other words, it is not as complete, not as dark, as the full shadow, because a little light is in it. It is the 'borderline' between the actual shadow and the light, where dark and light meet. On a sphere, this area (narrow band) is often called 'terminator'.

There are variations in terminology and definitions, especially in art (while science tend to be more interested in nomenclature).

Some call it "half-light", which is more correctly used for light that 'drags' along a surface at a very narrow angle.

(I hope I got all that right.)

For practical purposes, artists basically need to know that there are variations of light within a shadow. These variations often have a clear shape. Like in Brittany's photo: the umbra is triangular. Simply look for these variations, and paint what you see. Different light-sources will give different shapes, (sunlight and lamplight will spread the light differently) and then we have the fun of light that is reflected into shadows...

The penumbra has its shape, and colour. Just look for it, and paint what you see. It even works to 'cheat' (tongue-in-cheek), by painting it warmer and slightly lighter even if you don't actually see it. Make it slightly cooler and duller as it recedes. In Britanny's photo, the closer penumbra looks slightly more red-violet, and the one on the other side looks a hair more violet. This helps create the recession of the planes in the painting.

robertsloan2
01-03-2012, 11:53 AM
What a beautiful, subtle effect, Charlie. I looked back at Brittany's photo and you're right - the near penumbra is closer to red-violet (very muted) and the far more blue-violet (again very muted). Even looking almost straight down at the plane over a distance of maybe half an inch to an inch, that recession is there - so that's incredible. Heightening color would emphasize it.

This is awesome. Thank you!

Now you have me looking for it across the body of a brown cat on the floor. I'm going to have to work this out for cat hair too.

sketchZ1ol
01-03-2012, 02:17 PM
hello
using the compliment of a colour
( if you can accurately identify it :rolleyes: )
creates a Neutral grey , but
won't change the value
because the value of each colour
is part of the match/compliment .

if i roughly understand part of Charlie's point ,
dulling Intensity of colour suggests shape/depth ,
dimensional/' flat ' , and closer/further .

i suggest my old standby , charcoal , for value sketches ...
my brain seems to want denser coverage where
the colour is more intense
but not necessarily darker ...

Ed :}

ps. the umbra/penumbra effect still applies
for a value issue
> helps me decide how to bring in colour .

barriespapa
01-03-2012, 03:06 PM
Hi All I hope to get at least one reference done this month But I afraid after all the info on shadows if I don't get it perfect i am going to look bad. So much, for an old fella to soak up,doesn't seem to be a lot of ram left in my noodle. Thanks for starting of the year with another great spotlight Don.
David

Greenbrier33
01-03-2012, 03:48 PM
David,

I understand how the analysis could be off-putting. But, nothing substitutes for instinct, intuition, and originality -- which you've shown through numerous other posts.

Looking forward to your work, (the other) Dave.

allydoodle
01-03-2012, 04:50 PM
This is a great Spotlight subject Don. I'm not sure I'll have time to participate this month, but I am sure going to watch to see everybody's interpretation of the reference photos. This should be fun.

David,

I know it sounds like a lot of information to absorb, but in reality it's just a matter of observation (very close observation, and accurate in all it's nuances). You're already on your way, your paintings reflect much of what is being discussed. Things like value, warm, cool, shapes, edges, all these things come into play and need to be closely observed and translated into the painting. I have one suggestion for you try. Take an object similar to one of these photos, place it on a table, and put a light on it. Try to have secondary light sources not interfere with the set up as much as you can. Then observe, and maybe paint the object. "Become the shadow", as my teacher used to say. Then, after you've done that, paint the photo that is most similar to your setup. I'll bet you'll figure out the photo much easier because you've observed it closely from life first. This might help you if you've never done it from life yet. No matter what your approach, I'm sure you will come up with an excellent painting, I know your work and I know you can do it. As an aside, painting shadows is lots of fun. I could spend as much time on the shadows in a painting as I do on the subject casting the shadow. The reflected light, warm and cool, edges, changes in value, there is so much to consider that I could lost in the shadows! You'll do great!

Hi All I hope to get at least one reference done this month But I afraid after all the info on shadows if I don't get it perfect i am going to look bad. So much, for an old fella to soak up,doesn't seem to be a lot of ram left in my noodle. Thanks for starting of the year with another great spotlight Don.
David

DAK723
01-03-2012, 05:30 PM
Hi All I hope to get at least one reference done this month But I afraid after all the info on shadows if I don't get it perfect i am going to look bad. So much, for an old fella to soak up,doesn't seem to be a lot of ram left in my noodle. Thanks for starting of the year with another great spotlight Don.
David
David,

In some ways, this is the most important paragraph in the lesson:


Even though I have used color swatches in the above examples, I would like to emphasize that I don’t think it is necessary to try to match colors exactly – or even particularly closely. Art is not just about scientific accuracy, it is about personal expression. And the use of color is one of the best ways for an artist to express themselves! In my opinion, when it comes to representational art, values and colors need to be believable, not necessarily 100% scientifically accurate.
Honest!

I think the most important lesson in this Spotlight and the one about the Color of Light from last April, is to be aware of the color of the light (including secondary and reflected light). Once you are aware of it, you can decide whether you want to integrate it into your painting - and how much to integrate. At least for me, once I became more aware of the color of light, I saw how it automatically helps harmonize a painting. I'm sure that you will find the same thing.

Be aware of how objects in your painting are connected by color. That's really all there is to it!

Don

DAK723
01-07-2012, 10:57 AM
As you probably noticed...

The site was down for a while and now the posts from the past 3 days or so are gone.

You might want to wait a few hours to see if the site stays up - and to see if those threads are restored.

If they are not, please do post your paintings again!!

Don

Greenbrier33
01-07-2012, 11:38 AM
Don,

For a few hours, thought the Shadows Challenge moved to the

... T w i g h l i g h t Z o n e...

Awesome lesson! Dave

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jan-2012/227425-Peppers.jpg

DAK723
01-07-2012, 01:40 PM
The staff has posted a message that seems to indicate that the lost threads will be recovered. So hold off on posting any of your lost posts.

Here's the announcement:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=14262741#post14262741

Don

DAK723
01-07-2012, 01:41 PM
Dave, Great job on the peppers!

Don

medit8ng
01-07-2012, 04:41 PM
Thank you so much for this wonderfully informative spotlight! The photo references are great choices and I hope to get the opportunity to cast some shadows alongside of you!
I am learning so much from everyone. :) ~Noreen

Colorix
01-08-2012, 05:05 PM
Great peppers, Dave, and the blue bg really makes them pop! Entirely believable shadow on blue, too, good job!

robertsloan2
01-08-2012, 05:40 PM
David, beautiful reflected color in the shadows of your peppers! I love the bold color harmony of this painting. I don't always like primary schemes, yet you've harmonized it so well that it's gorgeous. I could almost reach in and grab one of them to cut up and eat it - mmmm!

Greenbrier33
01-09-2012, 12:52 AM
Thanks for feedback Don, Charlie, Robert. I hope to see everyone else make it back with their work.

Self-critiquing, I wanted a cool background against the hot-colored peppers. But, using blue does put it too squarely in the middle of primary triad...and it can seem very Kindergarten. A duller / grayer cool background would have been better (taking from last month's contrast lesson) than such a primary blue.

I also wondered about bringing some background into the shadows of the peppers. May look into that... Or else just start another ref! :)

Colorix
01-09-2012, 03:06 AM
David, on my monitor, the blue isn't all that primary at all, it looks like a cerulean, which is a bit muted. The whole thing is cheerful. In grey drab winter, it is a feast for the eye, and I think adults should have some cheer and fun too, not only the wee ones in a kindergarten. OK, this is a bit of my pet pevee, and may be typical northern Europe, but we were taught the *opinion* that colourful is childish and tasteless, and the right thing was discreet elegance, which equaled greys, with a daring splash of beige. Basically, that is the fashion of the 40s and 50s, but for some reason that has stuck hard to art.

elisamaria
01-09-2012, 07:10 AM
Dave, your peppers look so fresh and juicy and so well depicted with beautiful reflected colors in the shadows. It is a colorful striking painting in my eyes!

Elisabeth

elisamaria
01-09-2012, 07:16 AM
Here is my second spotlight painting on Canson Mi-teintes ( on color gris fumé) with Rembrandt´s soft pastels 15cmX20cm.

Critiques and comments very welcome!
Elisabeth

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2012/735472-P1060952.JPG

Colorix
01-09-2012, 03:08 PM
Lovely soft delicate eggs, Elisabeth!


I liked the eggs too, and experimented with cropping, and with colouring. (What a surprise... :D ) So I did a sketchy one in size A4 (ca 9x12"), on Fisher sanded.

It isn't properly colour corrected, the big shadow has lots of colours in it, but the strokes are of the same value and not this blotchy. (I simply didn't have the patience to "re-paint" it in PSE to make it look more like the original. Also, it is a night-time photo.)

Felt good to get back to the easel after a long holiday.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jan-2012/117343-iz-Egg-nl-C-f_8084.jpg

C&C always welcome.

Greenbrier33
01-09-2012, 04:24 PM
Charlie, I don't know how you perform such magic--the depth and complexity of emotion I such a simple shape. I write this from Helsinki where I work this week , and have so much thinking to do about your Northern Europe comment.

Elisabeth - the colors are as delicate as eggs themselves; so expressive and soft. I love the painting.

Colorix
01-09-2012, 05:08 PM
David, thanks a lot! Helsinki, ah! If you have the time, and have not been there before, there's a piece of architecture which I find enchanting (about the only modern building I love) and it is the world famous Rock Church, sometimes named something with Temple (Temple Rock Church). The reviews in this link (http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Finland/Etelae_Suomi/Helsinki-242105/Things_To_Do-Helsinki-Temppeliaukio_Rock_Church-BR-1.html) are accurate, the top ones at least, those I read... :-) It is purely amazing to see the illusion of a hovering copper ceiling.

DAK723
01-09-2012, 05:16 PM
Wow, two wonderful paintings of the eggs!

Elisabeth, your painting is filled with luminosity and delicacy!

Charlie, As always, light filled and wonderfully 3-dimensional!

Both have very nicely done shadows filled with color!

Don

Ruthie57
01-10-2012, 03:53 AM
Dave, I love your peppers! They shine, as do their shadows. I agree with Charlie about the blue background. The painting is vibrant, pulsing with colour!
Elisabeth. What lovely, delicate, luminous Eggs. I love the subtle colour variegation in this.
Charlie. More gorgeous Eggs. Love the crop, love the colour! I would know it was yours at 50 paces!

shrswmn
01-10-2012, 05:14 AM
elisabeth and charlie---love your eggs. Here's mine again, worked a little more than the missing onehttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jan-2012/973438-IMGP6140.JPG

artistat38
01-10-2012, 08:11 AM
Thanks Dan for this lesson on shadows...very informative especially to a beginner like me.

It was only last year that I started painting a bit and have been enjoying working with pastels.I particularly love to paint flowers and am looking forward to working on the lily and tulip pics.

thanks again for all the valuable information.

Prashanti.

barriespapa
01-10-2012, 12:51 PM
Hi All I did post peppers but they seem to have been misplaced, Just as well after looking at yours Dave mine looked real ratty I keep having trouble with the simpler aspects such as back grounds.
Chris and Don thanks for the vote of confidence and kind comments.
Charlie and Elisabeth, both great eggs I feel that they are the hardest of the group and I think I will take a pass on them. Maybe try the landscape.
David

Colorix
01-10-2012, 04:37 PM
Lost posts. Again. Lost PMs. Again.

David, glad you liked the beautiful original building, it is a gem!

robertsloan2
01-10-2012, 11:41 PM
David, I think you varied the blue enough to avoid "kindergarten" look. It's there but not as oversimplified. It fades off losing intensity in the tints and shades. On the peppers too, the reflected color and rich shadows do a lot to break the "kindergarten" look. I think it looks better than if you'd muted it to a blue-gray. It's just right as it is.

Remember I said I don't usually like primary schemes. This one is masterful. The "Kindergarten" look is why I don't usually like primary schemes. You danced right past it and made it awesome. That to me is more powerful than if you picked an analogous scheme that I'd have loved on sight. The green stems help too. So do the wonderful abstract curving forms that curve out and twist in on each other, their organic forms are so lovely and you accented their dimensionality with how you handled the depth. It's very three dimensional and solid, the textures of the crisp fruit are so real even more than the accuracy of the form. The shine of their waxy surfaces. The way the big stem on the red one is this weird curling 3D shape twisting in on itself and jutting out - protuberances and indents aren't just two dimensional.

It's much more than realism. It comes alive and the saturated colors are beautiful. You didn't do kindergarten. The red in the blue breaks that if nothing else.

Turpintine45
01-10-2012, 11:48 PM
Now I know I was looking at several beautiful egg paintings earlier.:confused:

Greenbrier33
01-11-2012, 02:56 AM
I want the eggs back !!! Such a short view of Charlie & Elisabeth's striking works.

Robert, thanks man. Honestly, still life realism is painful for me, because it's so easy to see weakness. I much rather paint expressionism or cubism than still life where it seems easier to hide :) But, I understand the discipline still life instills in painters: it makes one grow stronger all-around, because to paint believably you must focus so intensely on elements of painting. I always enjoy and inspired by your works and hope to see one if the thread behaves.

Ruthie57
01-11-2012, 03:19 AM
Oh No!!! Glad i didn't re-post my Eggs and sad that the lovely ones on here have gone. So, new posts are disappearing but the old ones still haven't come back. Hardly conducive to people making the effort to make posts and display work! I certainly won't until this is sorted out!

Colorix
01-11-2012, 05:22 AM
Same here, no re-posting until it gets stable again. I have prophetic powers, so hearken: The lost posts will never be recovered and we'll be told it was a technical problem.

Must say these glitches has spawned a lot of humour in the forums. And humours... :-)

DAK723
01-11-2012, 08:32 AM
Same here, no re-posting until it gets stable again.

Probably a good idea....The message from sallspaw (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/announcement.php?f=147) that appears at the top of the forums is dated from 1/10/2012 to 1/15/2012 which seems to indicate that the process of trying to fix things will take at least a few days more. Hopefully we'll get the word when the maintenance is completed and then we'll know whether we need to re-post the lost threads.

Ah, the fleeting nature of electronic data....:(

Don

barriespapa
01-11-2012, 10:05 AM
Hi All, thanks for the votes of confidence Don and Chris with a special thanks to Chris for your suggestion of setting up a similiar scenario. I have taken the liberty to post my effort hope that is okay Don. If the lost posts ever come back you will see what a difference it was for me painting from life.
Charlie And Elisabeth what wonderful eggs I never would have attempted them they just looked to hard yet you both made it look like a walk in the park well done.
David
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Jan-2012/448181-DSC_0002.JPG

Greenbrier33
01-11-2012, 01:47 PM
David,

Before (or in case) more posts disappear, want to let you know how much I enjoy your painting. It's so warm--exactly what we need here in the cold of Europe today, and probably in N.B. ! :D

I like the volume, placement of the shapes (intimately close--warm, and not artificially "staged" for painting), and the variation (instead of 3 peppers, a nice apple and Pomegranite). The shadows are really well done. I like the reflected red on the table, and that you brought some table ochre into the fruit shadows. Highlights are also accurate and refined. You were able to separate the red fruits without physically separating in the composition.

A background warmth supports the cast of characters and unifies the painting.

Very well done; thanks for sharing.
Dave (Greenbrier33)

spirothet
01-11-2012, 02:06 PM
I'm sad to see that those beautiful eggs that inspired me to try them are lost is space. They were all so well done. Here is mine anyway. Hope they don't get lost and that you get a chance to see them. Painted on Mi Tientes paper using pan pastels and sennelier. Size is about 5 x 7. C&C welcomed. Thanks, Cali

Colorix
01-11-2012, 02:47 PM
David (B), way to go! It certainly makes a difference painting from life. Well done!

Cali, beautiful eggs, they work great as a vignette on white!

I've painted the peppers, but I ain't gonna post no picture yet, not until the Cybermonster has had its fill. I guess tomorrow morning will show if posts remain.

allydoodle
01-11-2012, 03:04 PM
Hi David,

Yup, you got it all right! Great job, you've captured the form and feel of the objects, got some reflected light into the shadow, the reds are definitely reading as two items, just great! Glad it helped, now do more that way and you will quickly see how much better you will get. Then, when you want to do a spotlight, you will remember what you have seen in your setups, and if it is missing from the photo you will still be able to put it into the painting.

Now, I hope this post sticks...... if not, I'll repost again after everything stabilizes (hopefully soon...)

Turpintine45
01-11-2012, 03:13 PM
Dave just to let you know I think you did a great job with your alternative set up.I think Dave said it well in his reply and I agree.
Calli nice job on the eggs they are not easy and you did them well.
Hope these threads stay but just wanted you to know in case they vanish!!

robertsloan2
01-11-2012, 04:11 PM
Dave, great alternative set up! Love the strong color and beautiful modeling.

Cali, gorgeous eggs. Sorry I missed the vanished ones. Yours is glorious!

DAK723
01-11-2012, 06:32 PM
David, Wonderful painting! Always a good idea to paint from life! Not only good for the process of learning to paint, but it also gives you the knowledge of how photos are different and how to adjust them to be more life-like! Excellent shadows, very rich colors in the light and nice highlights, too!

Cali, Very nice job on the eggs! The shadows look great!

Don

barriespapa
01-12-2012, 08:48 AM
Cali great job on the eggs loved how you got just the correct edges on your shadows.
David very glad that you enjoyed my still life thanks for all the kind
complements. I most certainly wil try do do more from life
Charlie and Chris thanks for the kind words Chris thanks for the reply,you have certainly set me of in the right direction.
Robert thanks for the kind compliments
Don thanks once again for all the time and effort that you put in to this project this is definately the place to improve oneself.
David

Ruthie57
01-12-2012, 11:43 AM
David, Yay for setting up your own! Good work, love the pepper stalk!

Cali, Lovely Eggs, delicate colouring and great shadow!

I'm gonna risk it and post my next one. I upped the saturation on the Calla Lily one (Zantedeschia is actually what they are...I used to be a gardener in a previous life) and I saw lots of colours which didn't appear before.

So I thought I'd try Charlie's method with this....well, sorta. I started with warm colours for the areas in light and cooler for the shadows. I did some scumbling of different colours on the BG before I took this photo of the block in.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Jan-2012/189061-IMG_1518.JPG

Then I tried to do the scumbling/broken colour effect which Charlie does so well. OK, it's not up with hers but I am quite pleased with the effect.

A4 on white pastelmat.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Jan-2012/189061-peace.jpg

Ruthie57
01-12-2012, 11:45 AM
Oh, things still aren't right. I just posted a painting (serve me right) and it appeared to post but I couldn't see it. So I went on to talk and the spotlight thread showed me as the last poster. So I clicked on spotlight again but my post still isn't there!!! Why didn't I do CTRLC before I posted??? Grrrrrr

Ruthie57
01-12-2012, 11:54 AM
David, Yay for setting up your own! Good work, love the pepper stalk!

Cali, Lovely Eggs, delicate colouring and great shadow!

I'm gonna risk it and post my next one. I upped the saturation on the Calla Lily one (Zantedeschia is actually what they are...I used to be a gardener in a previous life) and I saw lots of colours which didn't appear before.

So I thought I'd try Charlie's method with this....well, sorta. I started with warm colours for the areas in light and cooler for the shadows. I did some scumbling of different colours on the BG before I took this photo of the block in.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Jan-2012/189061-IMG_1518.JPG

Then I tried to do the scumbling/broken colour effect which Charlie does so well. OK, it's not up with hers but I am quite pleased with the effect.

A4 on white pastelmat.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Jan-2012/189061-peace.jpg

Colorix
01-12-2012, 12:56 PM
Posts are back! And I promised to eat my hat if they did... May I have mustard and ketchup with it? LOL!

Ruthie57
01-12-2012, 02:09 PM
Just trying to post here again. I see more posts have disappeared in the last hour. My 2 previous ones didn't even make it at all!

Ruthie57
01-12-2012, 05:29 PM
testing

robertsloan2
01-12-2012, 06:32 PM
Purr, Barbara's pretty eggs are back. So gorgeous! Sorry I forgot to mention them.

David, your from-life pepper and pomegranate and apple still life is bright and lovely too. Mmmm pomegranates are one of my favorites! Yum yum. Interesting way you handled the wall.

robertsloan2
01-12-2012, 06:34 PM
Recent posts - new ones seem to become invisible on looking back at the thread. They do appear when clicking on "Advanced" when I scroll down to see what I'm responding to.

So they're here, Ruthie, they're just Invisible. They can be read by clicking on Advanced Reply rather than using Quick Reply. But you probably can't read this without using Advanced Reply to see it. Er... that could be self defeating...

Turpintine45
01-13-2012, 03:27 AM
Ruthie: they are here! You did a beautiful job on your lilies. Charlie will be proud when she sees them.

Colorix
01-13-2012, 05:45 AM
Hitting Advanced does work, and the confusion in posts is interesting. What happens when people can't see each other's posts. :)

As there are problems, do I get out of having to eat my hat? I mean, the principle was that the "maintenance" wouldn't work, after all... and, besides, I don't have a hat!

I've painted the peppers, and will post when this thread is healed.

Colorix
01-13-2012, 05:58 AM
Ruthie, wonderful Zantedeschia! I've gushed over them elsewhere, twice. But this is the biggest I've seen it!

What really hit me is that here you've gotten a very good sense of light, and the flowers look alive. In my not so humble opinion, painting from the large shapes first, and adding details only towards the end gives a more 'alive' feeling than careful drawing and starting with details. (Not that you do the latter, Ruthie.)

If I may, for education's sake, point out one wee thing in the cast shadow. The penumbra is handled beautifully, but as the far edge is warmer than the near edge, it tends to 'stand up' a wee bit. Some even warmer colours in the near edge would make it lie flat.

I love the shimmer, and the vase itself is such a gem! It really shimmers, and it works so well that the bg is softer, so the vase can shine! Even if this is a predominately cool painting, the yellows in the Z makes this a whole-spectrum painting, and that looks so real. Great job on this, Ruthie.

spirothet
01-13-2012, 06:54 AM
Elizabeth, Charlie & Barbara, stunning eggs! That's what encouraged me to try them. Thanks all for your comments! What to do next!!! Those Calla Lily's look great, but the peppers have a glow about them that makes me want to give that challenge a try. The peppers done so far have such a glow to them. Good work everyone. Cali

Colorix
01-13-2012, 07:29 AM
This thread seems to be healèd now. (Such a momentous thing it deserves the more lofty way of pronunciation. :D )

Pepper Shadow
A4 (9x12")
Fisher 400, diverse pastels.

Like with the eggs, I cropped closer, as it is the shadow that is interesting in this challenge. With both paintings, I decided to experiment more. The main egg has an orange-yellow outline where the light hits it at the area I want to be somewhat of an COI. (Not a pond, no.) In the Peppers, the cast shadow got this outline, as all edges were so sharp due to the sort distance, I soften the bg ones, but outlined the fg edge, making use of an idea that says it is a good thing to paint the transistions instead of smudging them. Not sure what I think about it, yet.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jan-2012/117343-iz-Pepper-shadows-Herczfeld.jpg

The table in light is lighter in real life. Nightime photos, you know how tricky they are...

C&C, yes please.

johndill01
01-13-2012, 07:40 AM
Charlie, if you will take one little bite of your hat, I will take one little bit of "crow". Going to hurt even with a lot of hot sauce. :-)

Glad to see that they made it work this time.

John

DAK723
01-13-2012, 08:45 AM
:crossfingers: :crossfingers: :crossfingers: :crossfingers: :crossfingers:

We seem to be back to normal here in the Spotlight...

:crossfingers: :crossfingers: :crossfingers: :crossfingers: :crossfingers:

And what beautiful new additions!

Ruth, Your "experiment" with the colorist method turned out fantastic! Wow!

Charlie, Your peppers are wonderful! Nice crop, and the handling of both the body shadows and the cast shadow is fantastic! They are so 3-dimensional they just pop off the page!


Thank you all for your patience during the period of lost posts and maintenance. :clap:

Don

branca
01-13-2012, 09:56 AM
your work is beautiful Charlie, I like the colors choice.

tvandeb
01-13-2012, 12:00 PM
Dave: Gorgeous , realistic bell peppers! Elisabeth; Very beautiful soft tones on your eggs! Charlie: Really like the color variations in the lights and darks; on the eggs. Stunning bright colors and darks on the bell peppers!Barbara; Beautiful, vibrant colors on your eggs! David: beautiful bright colors and realistic shadows on your bell peppers! Spirothet ;beautiful interpretation of the eggs!:clap: :clap:

Wonderful, informative lessons; Thank you!
I did the bell peppers; hopefully it'll load, couldn't get it to do that yesterday.. Done on uart-600 with various soft, semi-hard and pastel pencils! as always c/c and comments are most welcome...:wave: http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jan-2012/71359-spotlite-0112.12-bell_peppers.jpg

spirothet
01-13-2012, 01:42 PM
Charlie, your work never surprises me! Always well done. The shadow work on the peppers with the realistic stems makes you want to pick it off the paper. Tammy, I love the colors of your peppers. Very 3 dimensional. I might like to see a more defined cast shadow line, but lovely as is. Well done. Cali

spirothet
01-13-2012, 01:44 PM
Ruthie, your Calla Lilies are just beautiful! The flowers look almost transparent and the vase glows. Stunning. Cali

Turpintine45
01-13-2012, 02:37 PM
Charlie another beautiful example of colour and shadows. I think we can let you and john off the hat and crow eating and just be thankful everything is back so far!

Turpintine45
01-13-2012, 02:38 PM
Linda great job on the peppers. I like the shine on them.

Ruthie57
01-13-2012, 03:11 PM
Charlie, Fab Peppers! I love the shadow with the orange/pink edge. It works!
Tammie, Lovely shiny colourful peppers. I agree that maybe the shadow could do with a bit more depth of colour.
Thanks everyone for your comments on my "Callas". Charlie, you have it (of course) the shadow does "stand up" at the back and I never noticed until you said. this is an amendment I will make. It'll only take a minute!

Aint it great that this thread is back on the road!! All that's missing is my Eggs and, well, they're no loss...lol

tvandeb
01-13-2012, 04:08 PM
Thanks for the comments helpful tips, I did have the shadows darker, but added white grey and white on top of them.. Still need to get used to this sanded paper a bit more, seems like you can put more layers on it, then you can on pastelmat.. ?

elisamaria
01-13-2012, 04:15 PM
Charlie, thank you! Your eggs are so lovely too! I would call them "Charlie Eggs". The sweet peppers are fantastic, fresh and live, ready to eat. (somebody has eaten mine.:( )Love all your ingredients, the shadows included!

Dave, I´m happy that my eggs are back again and that you liked them. Thank you for your kind comments!

Don, thank you for your encouraging words! You see Don, without your good picture and instructions I could not have done it.

Ruthie, your commets warmed me. Thank you! I say the same to you about your Calla in vase; delicate and so luminous with such a great color varigations. Love your painting! I like your "invisible" eggs too.

Barbara,thanks a lot for the comments! When I saw your first painting of the eggs I was so inspired and encouraged to paint the same picture. Very nice! The second "edition" tuned out great! Well done.

David,I like your still life setting with your own selection on the table. The fruits and sweet pepper look so good with their shadows. Thanks for your kind comments on my eggs.

Cali, your eggs are stunning too! It´s really interesting to see five different paintings of eggs from the same ref pic (Ruthie´s may be already fried ?) all delicious food for the eyes. Thanks for your comments.

Tammy, Love your sweet peppers. Very well depicted. Appreciate your comment.

Elisabeth

elisamaria
01-13-2012, 04:25 PM
Here is my third Spotlight painting on Sennelier Pastel Card 22 cmx 30 cm with Rembrandt and Schminke.

Any critique and comments are most welcome!
Elisabeth

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jan-2012/735472-P1060975.jpg

Colorix
01-13-2012, 05:37 PM
Tammy, lovely peppers! You've consistently changed the light in both cast shadow and form shadows to look like the set-up was in cloudy light, well done. Oh, yes, the sanded papers take more layers than PastelMat (although it does take a surprising number for its lack of tooth, amazing really). Every new paper takes a bit of getting used to.

Elisabeth, beautiful Callas. You're really good at layering many colours and get that glowing shimmer.

Ruthie and Elisabeth, this is interesting, I see in the reference that there is indeed a hint of a pinkish line at the back edge of the shadow of the vase. I bet it is a bit of chromatic aberration (Don, is that right, a photo term?) where the lens makes one edge redder and the other bluer (my eye-glasses do that too). It is also visible in the flowers, in the same order. In other words, photos can lie in so many ways.

Don, thank you! The only reason I can make 3D out of a flat photo are the hundreds of "live" still-lifes I've painted. And all the sweet peppers I've admired before cutting them up -- my hands know their shape and their texture. Practice, practice... from life.

Cali, thank you! I'll try to surprise you one day... :-) You're welcome to pick the pepper from your screen and tell me how it tasted!

Jen, thanks a lot! And for the permission, now I don't have to dig out my summer straw-hat and chew fibers. :-)

Ruthie, thank you, great feedback, I've stared at those lines so much they practically scream at me, being overly obvious (maybe because they're a new thing I try). Might soften the edges of them a bit more, I'll think on it. And you simply must re-post the beautiful Eggs! Your shadow: Those are the kinds of things I scrutinize my own work for, it was almost a spinal reflex. It is darn hard to make aerial perspective in a space less than a foot deep. That pink would have worked if the front edge had been even warmer. I forgot to say before that you caught the cast shadow on the glass, it was very subtle and hard to see!

Elisabeth, thank you! Wild Charlie eggs, right? :-)

robertsloan2
01-13-2012, 05:55 PM
Oh wow. Charlie, my heart is singing with your peppers. The light pouring through them is fantastic. The color leads me around here and there, forms elegant, depth gorgeous, abstract shapes and musical lines, this is a beauty. I could get lost in it following all the little eyepaths and finding all the cool bits. Way beyond just a bit of reflected color there.

The light is dancing. The shadows are successfully insubstantial - I've had trouble getting that effect sometimes but the shadows are catching so many other light sources and soft reflections that the entire world around the setup is implied - and they clearly have no substance, they're just what they are, shadows because some light is blocked and other light isn't. Wonderful.

Someday I'll manage shadows that lively. Purr. And of course your full color seeing spectrum color harmony always delights me, that's partly personal taste to see the transitions handled that way.

Tammy, WOW! Your best yet. Best-ever painting. Those peppers are solid. They're just perfectly three dimensional, shiny, crisp, edible looking. Shadows are insubstantial and soft-edged, very light and that implies there's a fill light, the shadow's cast by sun from the window but other light or reflected light in a bright room is keeping the shadows faint. It looks true to life and implies specific lighting. Great dimension in those peppers. Glorious shapes. The fat stem of the left side red pepper projects forward beautifully.

You really outdid yourself this time, call this one a bit of finite perfection and frame it. I am not kidding. You could sell this one. If your art supplies aren't paying for themselves yet, now they will, keep painting like this.

Elisabeth, third in a lineup of happy surprises today. Your callas have their own special glow. They seem almost iridescent, the color harmony is gorgeous and you've also got perfect form and shape giving good depth to the painting. It's much more serene than the lively peppers paintings.

I think that feel of iridescence comes from that unusual combination of warm background and cool foreground objects - it works! It's there as a kind of counterpoint, also like the way the colors dance back and forth. Your colors are unified and look as if they shouldn't be. It's more colorful than life and on second glance it's not. It's more about noticing color in a rich light. I like the play of edges on the shadow on the surface, it also adds to the dimension of the painting.

Yours is dreamy and has a very strong mood. That's what I like best about it. The mood is quiet, deeply happy, almost reverent yet stops short of the extremes of certain styles of spiritual paintings. With simple callas you've evoked a lot of feeling.

Seriously, folks, all three of you blew me away. I love seeing the Spotlight and love seeing growth in painters I know, just love all three of these. Had to stop and analyze or I'd sound like a gushing fanboy.

tvandeb
01-13-2012, 07:30 PM
Elisabeth: Very beautiful callia lily's really like the blues and purples, Nice! :clap:

I did another today.. The beautiful rock formations. Smaller version so I could study the shadowing better. 6" x 4 " on some dark blue mi tentes paper ; doesn't take the layers to well. trying to use up the cheaper paper on these practice ones now.
With Carb-othello pastel pencils... :wave: Thanks for the great refs! May try a couple more.. Certainly very helpful; just finished a video on my interactive acyrlics, explaininghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Jan-2012/71359-spotlite-shadows-2-01.13.12.jpg blocking in the darks then adding the lights, along with what this months "Spotlite is about, all the information is very helpful, Thanks!

tvandeb
01-13-2012, 07:32 PM
Thanks for the comments too, still have alot to learn, so anything helpful you can offer, I'll accept..:)

robertsloan2
01-13-2012, 09:25 PM
Nice modeling on the rocks in your landscape, Tammy. They're good and three dimensional. Violet accents at the base of the bushes would rock, especially if they're sort of a deep grayed violet - bright violet alternating quite dark gray would do it, that could look really good.

It's something I picked up from Johannes and from Richard McKinley, yellow-leaning greens in a landscape or really any greens are often improved with violet accents. They always work. They don't have to be very much - just a touch of deep shadow right at the base and intermittent, not solid - but that really livens them up. Short strokes going same direction as the ones you used on the sagebrush. No more than 1/3 of the way up.

tvandeb
01-13-2012, 09:51 PM
Thanks Robert, that is very, very helpful, that explains alot. :clap:

DAK723
01-14-2012, 12:22 AM
Tammy - Very nice job on the peppers and the landscape rocks!

Elisabeth - Very nice painting! I really like your use of the warm orange mixed with the cooler colors in the background!

Ruth - Gosh, I thought all the posts had been restored, but you're right, your eggs are still missing! Please re-post them!

If anyone else's paintings didn't get restored, please re-post them, too!

Charlie, Yes chromatic aberration is the usual culprit for the thin "fringe" of color at the edges of things in photos.

Don

Scotyel
01-14-2012, 04:39 PM
I haven't been on WC for an age and can I say what a brilliant thread to come back to.!


Thanks, Don, for a brilliant lesson on shadows and also to all the other posts from other members to add to the subject.


After seeing all the warm colourful peppers and delicate eggs I was unsure about contributing my efforts.


I only have a small range of assorted pastels at present. Both were done on watercolour paper.



http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jan-2012/125874-pastelpeppers.jpg


The colours are a bit more subdued than the picture.



http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jan-2012/125874-pasteleggs.jpg

Was starting to have great problems with the shadow. It was getting overworked and muddy, so..... I cropped it and left it as it was.

Ruthie57
01-14-2012, 04:42 PM
Elisabeth, lovely Callas! The warmth in the BG works very well!
Tammy, Nice work on the rocks!

Here are my Eggs again. I was waiting until they were on a separate page from all the others :D

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jan-2012/189061-IMG_1460.JPG

Colorix
01-14-2012, 04:50 PM
Pam, wow, you show what can be done with few pastels! I vaguely rembmer you from back when, nice to have you back!

Ruthie, great you re-posted! You upped the translucency in a beautiful way!

And if Don makes galleries (delicate hint!), it will end up with all the other eggs!

CM Neidhofer
01-14-2012, 05:12 PM
Here are my peppers. I struggled with this one. I did this on a green Colourfix sheet. I didn't intend to put in a bg, but somehow it looked like it needed something, so I think I've thoroughly messed it up now. The shadows also bothered me and I struggled with those also. Just not sure about this, since I thought so much about what I was doing! lol Anyway, right or wrong, here it is. Any comments or help greatly appreciated.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jan-2012/40633-Peppers_Jan_2012_WC_Spotlight.jpg

robertsloan2
01-14-2012, 11:28 PM
Christine, wow! Luminous, dramatic peppers. Like the drama of the strong shadows and the rich colors. The violet really makes the greens rock and I like the green background too with all its variegation.

Ruthie, beautiful eggs. I expected no less of you, knew you'd handle those subtle values so well. I like the difference between cast shadows and modeling shadows and the subtle color transitions.

Pam, lively peppers! Something joyous about yours. The very faint shadows do suggest a fill light somewhere, a very bright kitchen with a sunny window to the right. The eggs look very soft and natural, I like the way you softened the transitions in the modeling shadows to make them so three dimensional. They read as 3D and real, very good white in muted lighting. Well done!

artyjim
01-15-2012, 06:57 AM
There is a whole lot of excellent work going on in here, apologies as it would take me some time to comment individually, so congratulations to you all.
I simply had to crack the Tulips, as nobody else has posted them as yet, hope you like them.
Also had a go at the peppers.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Jan-2012/975995-tulips.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Jan-2012/975995-peppers.jpg

Both completed approx 8" x 6" on black 400 grade sanded, with a variety of softs. Time taken on each approx 1.5 hrs.

DAK723
01-15-2012, 09:55 AM
Pam, Thanks for joining us! Lovely job on the peppers and the eggs! The eggs especially have some very wonderful color transitions in the shadows!

Ruth, Thanks for re-posting your eggs!

Christine, Nice job on the peppers! I think your dissatisfaction with the background might have to do with the violet color on the upper right. Violet and green are rather far apart on the color wheel, so it is unclear what might make table top transition from one color to the other. In my opinion, the light green background on the left side is working very well. It is lighter in value, giving more emphasis to the dark cast shadow, and the touches of yellow give it a nice sense of light shining on it. I think if the entire background were similar, it would unify the piece. I hope you don't mind my comments! And. of course, my comments can be ignored as they are just one man's opinion!

Jim, Wonderful paintings! The tulips are really vibrant! The peppers really stand up from the dark cast shadow - and I see nice subtle reds in those cast shadows, too!

Great work everybody!

Don

elisamaria
01-15-2012, 10:31 AM
Charlie, Ruthie, Tammy, Don

Thank you all for your encouraging comments! Tammy you are doing such a nice job! Ruthie, glad that your eggs are back again. I would not fry them, they are too precious!

Robert, even if you fear being a gushing fan boy, I took every word you wrote right into my heart!:heart: I confess you made my day and saw through my intentions. Thank you Robert for your comments, I was so moved and happy.:cat:

Scotyel Lovely sweet peppers and eggs! Look good on watercolor paper too.

Christine Like your colorful peppers! Art is so interesting and exciting when one can use the artist´s license quite freely which you have done. One thing which I note on my screene is that the shadows close to the peppers are almost black. May be IRL they are OK.

Jim great paintings! The tulips are gloving beautifully with interesting shadows and the peppers look fresh bright. I read a quotation of Harley Brown, which I take as an invitation to be a friend. I understand that you used the black paper to support the painting. In my eyes the black which shows through is a bit distracting and take too much attention from the main actors.

robertsloan2
01-15-2012, 10:40 AM
Elisabeth, the color harmony on your callas is something that I've dreamed of getting right and never quite succeeded at. Someday I'll get it. Coming close in fact, thanks to Charlie's class.

elisamaria
01-15-2012, 10:42 AM
Here is a repost of my sweet peppers, which unluckily together with other posts have not been restored yet.
Any critiques and comments are always most welcome.
Elisabeth

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Jan-2012/735472-P1060887.JPG

robertsloan2
01-15-2012, 10:47 AM
Nice! I like the gradated background, the variations in the shadows and reflected color, the shine on them. That yellow one glistens!

DAK723
01-15-2012, 11:33 AM
Elisabeth, Thanks for re-posting your peppers! Very Lovely!

Don

CM Neidhofer
01-15-2012, 02:06 PM
Thanks, Don and elisamarie. Don, I don't mind your commenting. I asked for any suggestions. I chose that violet as a contrast to the yellow pepper so it didn't get lost in the painting. But looking at it now, the yellow I chose I don't think is warm enough and makes the violet VERY violet. I was looking at a totally blank bg and just couldn't figure out what to do with it. Another thing I couldn't wrap my head around was the amount of green in the stem shadow, when it seems so far away from the stem. Or maybe it's just me!

Elisamarie, there is no black in this painting. There are dark violet reds close to the apples, applied over greens and reds. It may look almost black on a monitor though. Doesn't look that dark irl.

Thanks for all the comments. This was hard for me, even though I love painting peppers! :o

Colorix
01-15-2012, 02:47 PM
Christine, lovely juicy peppers! I too think the red-violet in the bg is popping forward quite a bit, and to the left, you have the same colour in the bg as in the fg, and that tends to put a flat area vertical. Looking at your bg, I see a lovely stroke just at the rear end of the big large pepper, where some blue-green and possibly blue is layered over the violet. I think that creates a lovely cool broken colour that, if you apply it over the violet, would push it back very neatly. And maybe a hint of the violet on the upper left side too, but lightly, just to unify. Stem shadow? On the table? Oh, it didn't have much green in it at all, in the ref, so either no green there, or take artistic license and put in lots of it.

Jim, your tulips pop and glow very nicely against that muted background! Really good feeling of 3D.
Luxurious peppers, rich colours. That darker shadow strip in the bg lays the surface down very neatly.

Greenbrier33
01-15-2012, 04:31 PM
Tammy, Always nice to see your work. Southwest desert scenes are some of the most difficult to paint and I admire your courage in tackling such a daunting subject matter. And…doing it so well!

Elisabeth -- dynamite flowers. The whole painting glows. I studied how you turned a very plain background in the ref photo into a song of many colors. The painting wouldn't be the same without the character you've added across the board.

Pam, I'm glad you decided to post! The eggs are very real, with soft, gentle, glowing tones. I do understand about mud…and cropping has worked to save more than a few of my paintings. Yours turned out so very well.

Christine, Super peppers! I love all the colors, even the violet / green background -- an unapologetic use of color. My eye gave a mental "extra credit" for being so original.

Ruthie, enough said already about your first-rate works! Though, I'll second Charlie's comment about the luminescence. So nice.

Jim -- tulips are dynamite. Very, very well done with the background vs. petals.
The peppers are intriguing. I like the stem work and the reds you've chosen. I see quite a bit of light dancing in the shadow between the two red peppers.

Charlie,
What more can be said about those peppers? I'm studying the stories your peppers tell: I think my favorite part is the unified warmth of background + peppers in harmony with cooler violet shadows. That orange / violet... mmm.

artyjim
01-16-2012, 04:45 AM
Charlie, Don and Greenbrier, thank you .
Elisamaria, thank you also, I use the this black support for these little excercises as it is more cost effective than the specialised art shop sanded papers. I buy it from the local DIY to use, as there is no real intention of selling them. I like your version of the peppers, it is very well painted.

Colorix
01-16-2012, 08:17 AM
Elisabeth, thank you for reposting the peppers. I guess my comments have disappeared too (too lazy to check). Lovely luminosity, and the violet-yellow of the shadow at the back (by the yellow pepper) was really well spotted, great example of good colour seeing, you're an excellent student!

David, thank you so much! I worked to keep the shadows (cast and form) together as a continuous "meta-shape" which is anchored at three edges of the painting. The yellow pepper is purposly cropped an toned down (if anyone believes bright yellow is 'toned down' :-)... as it is closer in value to the table. Then there are all these swirling curves, including stems, that go round-round-round... I also kept the red light between the peppers more muted, and that red is supposed to unify the two peppers.

T Porter
01-16-2012, 11:58 AM
Hi folks.

First off, thank you Don for putting this together. It is obvious you have put a lot of time and thought into this exercise and it is greatly appreciated.

Okay, I’ve been lurking around here for a while now and have finally decided to play along. I have been out of the creativity game for some time now. It’s been approximately 15 years since I have used my pastels or done any artwork at all, but I’m not going to use that as a crutch. I want your honest opinions. You don’t need to “sandwich” (I think that’s the term) your critiques for me so be brutal if it’s required. Don’t cut my any slack.

The tulip picture is 14” x 14” and was done on water color paper. I’ve been experimenting with watercolor paper and Gesso trying to get a support that will show a painterly effect. To give the Gesso tooth 220 grit aluminum oxide was mixed into the Gesso. I have been kind of a hack when mixing the two and not using any measurements so I can’t provide any ratios. I’ve been using more of a feel than anything to get the mixture. After the Gesso dried a burnt umber wash was applied and then the scene was sketched in using compressed “hard” charcoal. The pastels used for this painting were Rembrandt, Unison and Nupastels.


I found the color match for the flower pedals to be very difficult to achieve and then after looking at the original image on the computer verses the printed version that I worked from, I can see that I completely missed the background color. Color wise, in person, the painting doesn’t look as yellow but for some reason the photograph has a noticeably more yellow tint to it. Overall I’m okay with this painting. The parts that please me the most are the cast shadows on the structure and the shadow under the left flower’s pedal.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Jan-2012/500091-January_Shadow_Study_1.jpg

For the next study I used a neutral grey colored pastel paper. The brand is unknown. The painting is 22” x 16”. The sketch was put in using compressed charcoal. The background was done with Pan Pastels, using blues and violets.

I got a little too big with the sketch and had one of the flowers go off the page and lost the bottom part of the vase but I think the composition still looks okay. The areas that stand out the most for me and bother me is the center flower, the neck of the vase and vase’s shadow. I missed the shape of the flower bloom and it’s probably a little too dark. The neck of the vase is completely out of whack! I was so focused on trying to match the blue that I forgot to watch the shape of the neck, but I’m going to leave it as is and call that part good. The vase’s shadow…well I’m going to have to go in a fix that, it’s driving me nuts! It’s too dark. One of the parts I like is the left flower’s bloom it looks believable and the part that pleases me the most is the body of the vase. It looks translucent and reflective. The pastels used for this painting were Rembrandt, Unison, Nupastels and Pan Pastels.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Jan-2012/500091-January_Shadow_Study_2.jpg

robertsloan2
01-16-2012, 12:39 PM
Two great paintings! I love the background on those warm bright tulips. That's just gorgeous. The callas are spectacular. The crisp hard-edged blossoms read true and draw my eye, the overall color harmony is rich and beautiful. Light and shadow on the blooms are gorgeous. That left side shadowed bloom is so great. You captured how thin and translucent the petals are on the callas, that's another big plus. Good glass texture on the vase. Agree about the crop.

Yeah, the shadow is a bit off - perhaps it's just the hue rather than value, that it's so saturated a blue at the dark end rather than fading off toward a more muted gray-blue. You might try muting it along with lightening it a little the way you did on the shadows on the flowers?

Overall the painting's gorgeous though. Well done!

Greenbrier33
01-16-2012, 01:01 PM
TPorter,
Hardly looks like you're "playing". Both your paintings are spectacular. I'm won't sandwich...and will be direct. The gesso / umber wash effect is perfect for the tulips. It's a course background that contrasts so nicely against delicate flowers. It's original, too. The violet / green in the shadows is subtle, perfect shadows --really what this challenge was supposed to be about.

The second painting is about as life-like any pastel I've ever seen. I understand Robert's comment about the shadow and believe there is a way to manipulate that to recede further. Thanks for "playing". Your work is a real pleasure to view.
_________________

So I tried the tulips, which pretty much kicked my butt. (Sad to say I got whipped by a couple tulips.) Very tough. I cropped background shadows because they were distracting... 2 dead tulip ghosts waiting to steal your soul.

I missed the mark on the shadows...but will try another ref this week to keep growing.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Jan-2012/227425-Tulips.jpg

robertsloan2
01-16-2012, 01:20 PM
David, you're not as far off on the shadows as you think you are. I think the main shadow of the bloom came out well, value difference is good, the sense of texture continuing from the unshadowed wood came through. Great blossoms, they're very painterly and lively. Plenty of motion in this.

Colorix
01-16-2012, 02:16 PM
Hello T Porter, lovely paintings, fine introduction! The tulips stand out really well from the wall, and their shadows are interesting with the colour variations. Perhaps the bg is a wee bit too rough in texture for the delicate flowers. You make your own support? Love the brush-marks.

Well, it is kind of difficult to get straight critique in the Spotlight, as there's a custom that says it is a safe place to play. And, we have a boss, Don the excellent teacher, so one doesn't want to tresspass. You can post your images in the Pastel Studio/Gallery sub-forum, there we can have at them!

The Callas are very well painted, and the vase is really wonderful. Erm, I'm not crazy about the comp, though.

David, they fought you, but didn't win! Too soft, they are. I agree, there are many distracting elements in the ref. The big tulip has a nice rounded body and lovely varied colours. If you put both the ref and the pic of the painting in greyscale, some things might reveal themselves. And you got a nice sunny feeling to the dark bg, that's good!

elisamaria
01-16-2012, 02:25 PM
Robert, thank you again for your kind comments! I´m sure the next painting you´ll send here will be filled with color harmony of your heart. :cat:

Dave, my dynamite flowers have not exploded yet. They are quite safe. You warmed my feelings any way. Thanks a lot!

Charlie and Don my pleasure repost the peppers and I thank you for kind comments! Charlie I must confess that my color seeing was awakened during the many classes I have taken with Johannes V from the very beginning and then last summer at my summer place in Finland I really started to see the spectral colors in the glittering see and all over the place. The shadows I began to see more consciously but not so colorful yet. Your classes in Dec 2011 intensified the seeing and now this spotlight has given me just the opportunity to practice, which delights me so much together with such a team helping each other. Thank you all.:heart: :)

T Porter Beautiful flowers! So well done and gorgeous colors!.The callas could almost be taken as a photo so realistic and perfectly depicted.

Ruthie57
01-16-2012, 02:58 PM
Pam, we cross posted so I've only just seen yours. Welcome to the spotlight. The Peppers are lovely and vibrant and the Eggs are soft and muted. Good work on both!

Christine, great Peppers! I wonder if you would like the BG better if you muted and lightened it just a little?

ArtyJim, I love the Tulips! They look so fresh and real! I haven't looked back to the ref but the stem of the left hand Tulip seems to me to be coming out in slightly the wrong place. The Peppers are shiny and juicy and I love the loose treatment of the BG, particularly the strokes of darker blue at the top edge.

Elisabeth, I think I commented on your Peppers before but I'll just say they look great. As Robert said, the yellow one looks glimmering!

T Porter, Welcome! The Tulips are really good IMO. The Callas are wonderful! So 3D and real looking. The light is fantastic. Shame the bottom of the vase was missed off though. But you're not the only one who has run out of space when drawing!

David, what you said made me laugh! OK, maybe this is not your best work but I don't think the Tulips whipped you! They look very 3D and full of sunshine!

I'm working on another one.....

T Porter
01-16-2012, 03:47 PM
Thanks everyone.


Charlie,
Thanks for the insight.

No, I don’t want to give the impression that I make my own supports, I have only been messing around with altering the papers finish to give it more tooth. I’ve been doing that by adding 220 grit aluminum oxide to the Gesso and then brushing that mixture onto the paper. I think most people that coat their support with Gesso add marble dust. I wanted to experiment with aluminum oxide.

The coarseness of the background may be part of the issue that I have with the tulip picture. I’ll try softening the background and see how it strikes me.

Ha! Okay, the composition is pretty weak for the Callas painting. Hmm, I didn't defend my work very well did I? :lol:

DAK723
01-16-2012, 09:00 PM
Tom, Thanks so much for joining us! It's hard to believe that you have taken a 15 year hiatus from painting - both of these paintings are excellent! You have given the tulips wonderful depth and 3-dimensionality while still retaining their delicacy - no easy task! The flowers in the vase are wonderful, too!

Dave, I like the looseness and tight crop on your tulips! Nicely done!

Don

pameladallaire
01-16-2012, 11:01 PM
I can't wait to jump into the challenge, but it will have to wait until the 22nd. Until then, I'll just look at everyone's wonderful work. :)

Pam

Ruthie57
01-17-2012, 08:17 AM
Heres my next one, about 7x11 on white pastelmat. I can already see I need to work on it some more.....

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jan-2012/189061-red_rocks.jpg

DAK723
01-17-2012, 08:28 AM
Ruth, To say that you have successfully rendered the light and shadow of the rocks would be an understatement! Wow!

Don

sketchZ1ol
01-17-2012, 09:15 AM
hello
i'm enjoying all of the posts :)
good clean ref pixs ,
and everyone is taking advantage
with their point of view and sticks-at-hand :) :)

Ed :}

T Porter
01-17-2012, 10:19 AM
Very well done, Ruth. I like the way you handled the reflective light and the way you cropped the image.

Colorix
01-17-2012, 10:30 AM
Ruthie, gorgeous! You really know how to keep the shadow masses and the light masses intact and separate! It glows! Wonderful!

shrswmn
01-17-2012, 10:49 AM
here's my lily---Ruth, I'm learning from you---I underpainted a bit:http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jan-2012/973438-IMGP6145.JPG http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jan-2012/973438-IMGP6157.JPG
the second is about 3 layers later.
Everyones work is so beautiful, I keep looking over and over again

robertsloan2
01-17-2012, 11:52 AM
Sweet lily, Barbara! That's gorgeous! Thanks for showing the early stage. It's so striking. I love the subtle hue shifts in the shadows, very light transparent shadows.

Ruthie, wow! Your red rocks are massive! They punch the sky. I barely noticed the shadows because they worked - they made the rocks so solid they loom as if I could walk a few steps forward and lean on them. They are elegant. I like the cool shifts within the shadows.

tvandeb
01-17-2012, 12:00 PM
Barbara-Great interpretations on your peppers and eggs! Ruthie; Beautiful colors on your eggs! Wow, really love the rock formations!Christine: Vibrant, bright colors on your peppers-Nice! Jim: Gorgeous colors, textures and shadows on your peppers and tulips! Elisabeth: Great color choices on your peppers! T-Porter: Beautiful paintings on your florals!Greenbrier33: Gorgeous, bright tulips-Very Nice! Barbara: beautiful soft colors on the yellow lilly!:clap: :clap: I hope I didn't forget anyone; really all gorgeous!

I Had some time early this morning to do the tulips; another miniature on white pastelmat-4" x 5" with carb-othello pastel pencils...:) http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Jan-2012/71359-spotlite-Jan.-Tulips-01.17.12.jpg

robertsloan2
01-17-2012, 12:23 PM
Tammy, beautiful warm tulips. I like how you handled the shadows. The more muted background really pushes the bright flowers forward and their colors are wonderful.

Ruthie57
01-17-2012, 12:53 PM
Thank you folks! Charlie and Robert, thanks for not mentioning that godawful triangle! It has already been amended!

Barbara Nice Lily! The shadows are convincing and the stamens are great. Did you find the underpainting helped you to find your way?

Tammy, beautifully modelled Tulips and shadows! the petals look just how Tulip petals feel, if you know what I mean.

DAK723
01-17-2012, 10:06 PM
Barbara, Very nice painting of the lily! Wonderful color harmony!

Tammy, I really like the tulips! Definitely a wonderful sense of light and shadow!

Don

shrswmn
01-18-2012, 06:55 AM
Thank you all for the complements. Yes Ruth, the underpainting helped alot to block in the drawing, but also to give subtle undercolor in the shadows that I don't think I could have achieved directly. I'm dicovering that layering pastels (and colored pencil) is as worthwhile as with oils. I also found that fixative between the layers gives more tooth, at least on the Strathmore pastel paper I'm using, than the paper itself. I think I'll do another layer to try to brighten the yellow a bit more.

Colorix
01-18-2012, 12:00 PM
Barbara, the lily is so well done, a clear separation in value and colour of the light and shadow! Fixing between layers is good practice on that kind of paper. How's the pastel situation in Israel? Can you get decent supplies? (Sweden is like it is outer space, I have to order from abroad.)

Tammy, I agree with Robert, the shadows of the tulips are well handled, and the flowers stand out well from the wall's colour.

Ruthie, you mean the dark arrow pointing to the treasure? ;-D You could fix it with a red X "dig here". (Teasing, the painting is great.)

shrswmn
01-18-2012, 12:57 PM
Charlie, We have 2 world class art schools in Jerusalem---Betzalel and The Studio School, so there are a couple of art supply stores that import quality supplies. I'm working with Royal&Langnickel---fairly inexpensive, but i'm happy with them, at least at my beginner level.

T Porter
01-19-2012, 08:44 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jan-2012/500091-January_Shadow_Study_Eggs.JPG

13" x 13" on dark gray paper. Unison and Rembrandt pastels were used for this painting.

Colorix
01-19-2012, 09:10 AM
Barbara, good for you!

T, beautiful!

elisamaria
01-19-2012, 09:42 AM
Dave, like your loose painterly tulips in sunshine!
Ruthie, what gloving, soft and gorgeous mountains. I will have a go on them.
Barbara, the lily is so well painted with so many color gradients in shadow and light.
Tammy, another beautiful painting! Thanks for your kind comments on mine.
T Porter, what wonderful eggs!!! Love them.

Judibelle
01-19-2012, 10:26 AM
Everyone has done such a beautiful job...! The eggs all look so delicate and so well done. and the peppers all look good enough to eat! what gorgeous lilies!..Love them.
And Ruthie, your mountains are spectacular!

Well, after several weeks of the blahs, I finally got inspired to do the peppers.

First mistake was not judging the placement correctly....too low to the bottom...couldnt fit in the whole shadow. there are other mistakes, but hopefully I will learn from them.....
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jan-2012/103700-scan0001.jpg_peppers_Spotlight.jpg

beetee
01-19-2012, 10:28 AM
Great stuff everyone!
Like those eggs T.porter:thumbsup:

My effort tulips(about 90 mins) rembrandt pastels on murano paper approx 10 x 8.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jan-2012/197555-mixxy-17.1.2012-031.jpg

Took me a while to get going- about 2 weeks -cant seem to get interested at the minute-but am glad I forced myself.

Anybody got any tips for colours and methods for nice painterly backgrounds?

Brian

robertsloan2
01-19-2012, 12:07 PM
Cool tulips, Brian - I like how you vignetted the painting and simplified the background. Beautiful form on the flowers.

Tips on painterly backgrounds and colors for them. It doesn't matter what colors you use, what matters more is changing colors every couple of inches and overlapping them. A lot of painterly backgrounds are created with short strokes going every which way, then overlapping different closely related colors - one step darker or bluer or yellower or pinker. Try gradating your background with more warm colors on the side where the light is and more lighter tints on the side where the light is, cooler colors and slightly darker values on the side the shadows point towards.

You can also flatten a table or flat surface in a background by thinking front to back. Warmest colors front and on the side the light's coming from (so the very warmest and lightest is the lower right corner), with cooler colors receding as you move toward the back where it meets the wall. This can be done by modifying the color of the flat surface.

Say it's a green lawn. You get more muted and cooler as it recedes toward the end of the yard, you get warmer, yellower green grass with more saturated color toward the front, you also have this same gradation side to side with the sun on the right so it's the front right corner that gets the brightest yellowest greens and the farthest left point that's still on the ground that gets the bluest, coolest, most muted greens.

Even if it's subtle this effect will make a very lively background. Painterly mostly means using strokes expressively instead of hiding them. Non directional overlapping strokes that are short and go every which way are a good background texture.

I hope that helps. Try to make the transitions subtle, if they're too dramatic it can be jarring.

Judi! Wow! Your peppers are awesome. I love the depth and volume you got in them, especially the big red one on the left. It has a solid presence that makes me smile and think of reaching for a knife to start cutting it up to go into my food. The stem is beautifully rendered too, has an interesting swirling shape that's very 3D and tangible.

Shadows are good, I like the way you have them lighter near the light source and the gradation of color is cool on them. Overall, this came out beautifully.

You're aware of the problem with the placement. The only other thing I can see is that you may be frustrated with flecks of paper showing through on the peppers themselves, unintended pale accents. Also a little bit of halo effect where the shadow color doesn't quite meet the edge of the form.

Pastel is opaque. If you want to try something next time, try smudging in the background first and let it overlap a little into the form shapes. Then smudge in the base color of the forms so the white flecks are gone. You can even just pick up pastel dust with your finger for that layer, or with a chamois. Then work over it with sticks and use a firm stroke at the edge to establish the hard edges of the forms, leave them soft or blend them out where you want soft edges.

I know that was tricky for me to learn and bugged me in more than one dry medium. It won't always work in paint because it might be too transparent, or in colored pencils, but in pastels if it's a thin layer like your shadows a stick mark will cover it completely.

T_Porter, your eggs are gorgeous. I like the way you heightened the color shifts in the shadows, so rich and prismatic. Good smooth soft transitions too, contrasting nice clean hard edges where they belong. Your edge handling is beautiful in this one.

beetee
01-19-2012, 02:07 PM
Thanks again Rob for pointing me in the right direction :thumbsup:
i will have to gen up on warm/cold colours!

robertsloan2
01-19-2012, 03:13 PM
Warm colors - red, orange, yellow. Cool colors - blue, green, violet.

Each spectrum color also has a warm/cool version. Orange that's yellow-orange is warmer than the red-orange. Violet that's red-violet is warmer than blue-violet. Blue is pure warm, or violet is, yellow is the hottest color.

Grays are cool neutrals especially if they drift toward blue or violet or greenish. Browns are warm neutrals drifting toward red, orange or yellow.

So whatever the local color is (the color of the thing itself, like a pink tablecloth), it's affected by the color of the light (yellowish light will have its opposite, violet cast shadows) and by exaggerated distance perspective. The color shifts are real but very subtle in life. In a painting exaggerating them uses color to help create the form and make a plane lay flat.

Colorix did a wonderful course that I got most of this from: ESP: Still Life the Colourful Way. (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527268) It's in the Pastel Library or Archive, whatever that's called. A very long thread because the course was more than one month of material but if you read it slowly and try things as you come to them, it's incredible. Posting exercises from the course in the Gallery will often have those of us who took the class commenting on it and helping.

That class completely changed how I see color and how I paint it.

Colorix
01-19-2012, 04:39 PM
Judi, wow! Gosh, your peppers are *wonderful*! You've developed *so* much since we first met. I see clear distinctions, and bold bright colour! You know, often we don't *feel* like we grow, as we try more difficult things as we go.

Brian, beautiful flowers, they look great, really have that fragile solidity of flowers. (Sounds odd, I know, but how to describe it?) The shadows are very believable and clearly *on* the wall, nicely integrated with it.
I read only the start of what Robert says, so forgive me if I repeat something. I see you work on a 'simple' pastel paper, so you can't build up many layers. I'd recommend, for a painterly look, that you don't blend much. The first layer may need to be blended into the paper, and the second layer can be blended into the first, but after that, it is better to let the sticks blend themselves. You can put in a base layer, and not blend any following. Space out the strokes (make them with the side of a stick), and then put a slightly diferent colour inbetween, and yet a third. I did see Robert explain how.

To say it in fewer words: paint bg as you painted the flowers.

DAK723
01-19-2012, 06:36 PM
Tom, Fantastic Eggs!

Judi, Great job on the peppers! Yes, sometimes we run out of room! I think we've all been there!

Brian, Very nice job on the tulips! Very warm and light-filled!

Don

beetee
01-19-2012, 07:36 PM
Thanks Robert-good explanation-a lot to take in-:)(I only have a starter portrait set of 30 Rembrandt sticks so maybe i dont have that many warm/cool variants)I get awfully confused with colour-a discussion for another thread,I dont want to hi-jack this one any more...
Thanks Charlie- the shadows are pure luck on my part first sticks I picked up,thanks for the tips on paper and technique-eveything helps.
Thanks Don for the complinent.

Cheers again
Brian

tvandeb
01-19-2012, 07:44 PM
TPorter; beautifully done on the eggs; really like the color choices! judibelle;
I agree with Charlie you are really coming along on pastels. Beautiful vibrant colors on your peppers! Brian; Very well painted on your tulips; very soft looking just like tulips are supposed to be!:clap: :clap: :clap:

I really dislike doing anything yellow or white in pastels, difficult for me; probably why I'm avoiding those eggs... But I did try the yellow lily; not that happy how it came out, may have to rework it some more...Done on a minature 5" x 4 " sienna pastelmat with carb-othello pastel pencils..:) http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jan-2012/71359-spotlite-Jan-Yellow_lilly-01.20.12.jpg

Turpintine45
01-19-2012, 11:27 PM
Wow I am way behind in commenting at all the wonderful art that has appeared here this month. Way to go everybody! I will try and comment as far back as I can see.:clap:

Ruthie your rocks really vibrate with light and shadow!Great work!
TPorter your eggs so transpaprent you can almost see the baby chicks inside wonderful work.
Judibell I don't think placement matters for this purpose and the shadows look good and the peppers are well shaped and vibrant, well done.
Betee good work on the tulips nice colours in the shadows too.
Linda yellow is my favourite colour so I love this one.Not the easiest colour to keep looking fresh but you did it.
I am sorry for not mentioning everyone but you all did a wonderful job!

Turpintine45
01-19-2012, 11:30 PM
Well here is my effort. I really messed this up and the stems are too fat but tried to keep all of Don's knowledge in my head. Obviously a load ozzed right back out.
9 x 12 varios pastels.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Jan-2012/216461-IMG_7471_Medium.jpg

artistat38
01-20-2012, 04:30 AM
Thanks Dan for this months spotlight...have been learning so much from this thread...heres my version of the yellow Asiatic lily...looking forward to lots of c&c as Im absolutely new to pastels...especially how to create the background..... Prashanti.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Jan-2012/981539-IMG_0770.JPG

Judibelle
01-20-2012, 08:06 AM
Thanks for the vote of confidence, everyone....appreciate it. and for the tips, Robert, that you gave both Brian and me! I printed them out to keep by me while working...

Brian, I think your tulips turned out well. i'm still working on mine...
Tammy...Your vibrant yellow flower is spectacular! Well done!
also, artistat38...great job!
Jen...I love your lillies...the background is especially beautifully done....

elisamaria
01-20-2012, 08:26 AM
It´s always a joy for me to see so many beautiful artworks on these pages, nice food for the eyes.
Judi, your peppers are really good!
Brian, lovely shadows on your warm shimmering tulips!
Tammy, another glowing flower!
Jen, great work, which was well worth doing! Lots of gradations! Beautiful callas!
Prashanti, I wouldn´t have belied you are new to pastels. Brilliant work!
Elisabeth

elisamaria
01-20-2012, 08:33 AM
This is my interpretation of the mountains. Painted on Sennelier Pastel Card with Rembrandt and Schmincke pastels size A4.
Any critiques and comments are always most welcome.
Elisabeth

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Jan-2012/735472-P1070006.jpg

artistat38
01-20-2012, 08:56 AM
thanks Judi and Elisabeth

Elisabeth.... Love the crop of the mountains...the light and shadows have come out so beautiful....

prashanti

T Porter
01-20-2012, 09:06 AM
Elisabeth, very well done!

The contrast between the stone and the sky has been nicely handled. The far right stone is my favorite part. It really glows! You’ve painted the highlight from the direct sunlight and reflective light on the shaded side perfectly and the fact that you lessened the reflective light the further down the rock you painted shows your attention to detail. Congrats!

barriespapa
01-20-2012, 10:37 AM
Ruthie what a beautiful job on the flowers and the vase. Very interesting process I must give that a try myself.I am never quite sure about the right colors for under paintings thanks for sharing and I guess some of the credit goes to you Charlie. If I remember correctly I believe you said that one should use cool below warm and vice versa, hope i got that correct.
here is my rendition of the landscape. please critique I would like to frame this one. It is 12 x 14 on uart 800. great americans.
David
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Jan-2012/448181-DSC_0003.JPG

barriespapa
01-20-2012, 02:11 PM
Imust have cross posted or something I missed your lily Tammy very nice work .Also missed your flower in vase Jen great job . Artistat, great lily think you did agreat job on the bG. Elisabeth I really liked your cropped version of the western scene.

DAK723
01-20-2012, 02:33 PM
Wow! Everybody has been so busy since I was last here yesterday!

Tammy, Nice job on the lily! Nice contrast between the yellow and the blue background!

Jen, Very nice painting! Love the subtle color variations!

Prashanti, Thanks for joining us! Nice painting! The background looks fine to me. There is very little background, so keeping it simple with just a suggestion of some leaves was a good idea!

Elisabeth, Very nice! I like the crop and the rocks and their shadows look good!

David, Very nice job on the road through the trees! Very difficult painting to do! One thing you might want to look at is the value of the entire shadow. It seems to me that in your painting, the shadow on the road is considerably darker than the shadow on the grass. In the light, the road and grass are very close to the same value. If we look at a grayscale of the ref...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Jan-2012/82335-05-ref7_by_CHClementsgray.jpg

...I think we can see that the value of the shadow does not change that much as it switches surfaces. A possible suggestion - use a little of the road shadow color to darken the grass shadow color. It might also help make the green shadow color more neutral. Use just enough to darken it, but try to keep enough of the green (or use a darker green) so that you still have a slight color shift as the shadow goes from road to grass (easy for me to suggest - not so easy to do!). Just a thought!

Don

barriespapa
01-21-2012, 08:43 AM
Hi Don thanks for all your help I have decided to try a slightly greyer green on the grass shadows i think this will make the painting more in line regarding the shadow values i will post results
David

Ruthie57
01-21-2012, 09:39 AM
Loads going on here :)

T Porter, your Eggs are fabulous! The shadows positively shimmer.

Judi, very nice peppers! They look nice and rounded and trhe shadows are very believable.

Brian, Great Tulips, you got the petals down to a tee! (or a Beetee maybe, lol)

Tammy, glowing yellow Lily!

Jen, I love your Callas! I really like the way you've defined the shapes of the flowers and the light and shade makes them look so real. I don't think the stems are too fat really. These flowers have really chunky stems.

Prashanti, The Lily is really good! The stamens are coming forward as they should. Good colours you used for them.

Elisabeth, Lovely Rocks! I like your crop better than mine. I had trouble with the big rock on the left as I wanted it to be much less important than the others. By coming in closer and having it go off the top you seem to have solved that. I do love the variegation of colour on that rock though. Good handling of the light and shade and of the foliage too!

David, this is great! I absolutely love your foliage and sky "holes". I would try some violet over the green for the grass shadows. It would darken and cool them nicely I think. When I think grey I try to think violet as it often works better.

barriespapa
01-21-2012, 12:49 PM
Thanks Ruthie, I appreciate your comments about the violet/grey. I had already gone over with green grey in this post. however I must say i am getting a little confused since I started using the photoshop program. It seems that one can totally change the entire look of the painting by tweaking here and there with the tools in p.s.e. which of course doesn't give the critiquer the correct info at all. In the very first painting the green colors were not accurate to the actual painting so in this one i used the saturation and hue to come up with a more correct copy of the painting. I have also increased the size of the foreground shadow on the left. I can see that i should do some softening of the shadow edges.in a few areas. let me know what you think all comments are welcome.
David
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Jan-2012/448181-DSC_0004.JPG

sketchZ1ol
01-21-2012, 01:50 PM
hello
David - very crisp , well articulated work :thumbsup:

not having a piece of red cellopane
let along those tech toys ,
i will make a best guess by eye (?!) .

the deep-dark shadows on pavement
anchor the foreground
and play well with the tree masses ,
but at the same time ,
the ref pix has the red/blue/gray pavement which
brings the value closer to the shadows .
> that ref also shows layers of shadow on the grass
b/c of closer leaves/limbs to the ground plane .
= a challenging landscape pix b/c
the relative distance between light , blocking object and shadow
isn't as obvious as the still life examples ( mostly ) .

i agree that your painting is a keeper !
and some experiments on scrap would be sensible
if the tech toys ain't gettin' it right now .
> it's using the sticks , after all :D

Ed :}

DAK723
01-21-2012, 02:45 PM
David, Very Nice! I think the cast shadows read much better now!

I think one of the first things you learn when you start taking photos of art work it how inaccurately a camera captures color. I mean, for most purposes the color seems fairly close. After all, we never take our photos and hold them up to the scene we photographed to compare them. Until we photograph our paintings, of course. Then we need to adjust them as best we can on the computer, but even then, it is never perfect!

So yes, when we critique paintings here on WC, we aren't seeing the actual painting. So our comments aren't always accurate and the artist should make sure that whatever critiques are suggested are valid for the actual painting - not just the photo of the painting!

Don

T Porter
01-21-2012, 04:32 PM
Charlie,

Thanks for the demonstration that you posted in the Studio and Gallery forum it was very helpful. I tried to use your painting as an occasional reference rather than trying to copy it. This technique for painting is quite amazing and fun! I will try to use it more often in the future.

This painting was done on the rough side (the machined side) of dark green Canson Mi-Teinies paper. The paper measures 19 5/8” x 13”.

Tom

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Jan-2012/500091-January_Shadow_Study_Peppers.jpg

robertsloan2
01-21-2012, 06:33 PM
Interesting crop on your red rocks, Elisabeth, liked the modeling.

David, your painting is very striking. I love the shadows slopping over onto the path, beautiful. Yeah, I'd frame that.

Tom, wow! Love your rendering of the peppers. You got very jazzy with accent marks and rich color, the dancing colors in this one are so lively! Beautiful shadows puddling around the peppers too, the whole painting is so colorful and cheery. Well done! You've got a distinctive style.

shrswmn
01-22-2012, 02:50 AM
Tom --delicious peppers your highlights really make them shine---great textures

David ---lovely rendering of a difficult scene---your aeriel perspective is wonderful---draws one right down the road, and your trees are welcoming .

elisamaria
01-22-2012, 08:17 AM
]Prashanti, Ruthie, Don, David, Robert
So interesting you all thought the crop of the painting was pleasing. Thank you for your kind comments!

Ruthie, T Porter
I am very happy reading what you commented. It gives me lots of confidence especially when you just pointed out what I wanted to express. Thank you for your encouraging words!

David
I loved to have a long walk in your summer fresh painting, walking far away. Lovely perspective and depth with soothing shadows!

T Porter
I love your juicy peppers! Charlie has indeed inspired you. I admire your layering of the colors on this paper, and to my liking too, leaving some texture of the paper in the background .

Colorix
01-22-2012, 09:29 AM
Tammy, lily really pops with a blue background, well done! Yellow and white becomes doable if you forget they are yellow or white. :-) Sounds 'cute', but the thing is that the shadow sides/parts are darker than what the pigments we use are, so look for other colours of darker values there. Yellows tend to go either rather olive-green, or more orange-pink, in shadow, sometimes a warm brownish.

Prashanti, another beautiful lily, with a harmonising background. The background is good.

Jen, the lilies, where did you get the idea they're 'messed up'? They're beautiful! Great shadow work!

Elisabeth, nice cliffs, they really glow!

David, Good sense of distance in the landscape, and Don gave you what it needed, new version looks good!
PSE can do many tricks ..... Mine sits up and begs... :-) I tend to say I "repaint the painting" with it, as I always have to tweak colours. Different cameras give different colours, too. (I have to de-sat red, and up saturation on blues plus darken them.)
You can put any colour over any other, if they are close in value, as long as you don't blend. (Sometimes it works with big value differences too, but that is experimental.) Some use a system of underpainting with the opposite temperature. Or opposite colour. There are so many ways of doing things and getting a good result.

Tom, beautiful peppers! Thank you for the compliment of being inspired, I post WIPs now and then hoping to inspire colour lovers to go for it. This is clearly your own painting in your own style! Gorgeous colours, and the turning of the forms are beautifully done! (And I'm way impressed you got all that on Canson, you must have quality sticks.)

Turpintine45
01-22-2012, 11:43 AM
Prashanti[/B. Love your shadows in the flower, and the beautiful stamens. The purple background really makes the flower pop!
[B]Elizabeth nice crop. You can really feel the heat radiating from the rocks. Those deep shadows anchor them beautifully.
David reworking the grass shadows made this a winner.
Tom your peppers just glow. Great job!

Ruthie57
01-22-2012, 12:13 PM
David, that's definitely better! I would push the shadows on the grass a little more though, especially in the most shaded area, near the big tree on the left. This is a winner! Did I say I really like the tree foliage?

Tom, great Peppers! You beat me to it. I thought I may try them a la Charlie too.

Greenbrier33
01-22-2012, 01:31 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Jan-2012/227425-IMG_0843.jpg

robertsloan2
01-22-2012, 01:55 PM
Oh wow! David, this one's wild! Like the non-representational colors and the jazzy strokes, very dramatic.

goeppeka
01-22-2012, 02:35 PM
David, I love your painting. It is wild and imaginative and different.

goeppeka
01-22-2012, 02:38 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Jan-2012/205750-Eier.jpg

These egge are done on La Carte, Soft Pastel, 23 x 31 cm

C & C welcome. :)

Greenbrier33
01-22-2012, 04:39 PM
Thanks Robert, Karin.
{Robert, you're always so kind.}
{Karin, like other work in the thread this month, yours is astonishing.}

I almost didn't post...because it is jarring and may prompt quite a bit of skepticism. This road -- which has been so expertly painted in realism by other artists this month -- presented itself to me as a chance for expressionism.

I did set out to respect this month's topic--shadows. I ignored the billion-or-so leaves and other details and instead sought to push some extremes in terms of temperature, value, and hue.

Simplified:
--Temperature, cold trees against a hot road.
--Value, I worked to find a red of the same value as blue (NOT EASY), to suggest a contiguous shadow from forest onto road.
--Hue, overall they are un-neutralized (is that a word?), and so very far away from realism. I attempted to neutralize...a little ;) ...in the distance, and keep purer hues closer to the viewer.

So, we are jarring & wholly un-representational here. But then, that's the way life is, sometimes... :D

branca
01-22-2012, 05:02 PM
this is my peppers shadow:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Jan-2012/165441-IMG_2461.jpg

robertsloan2
01-22-2012, 05:08 PM
Karin, your eggs are so dramatic and luminous. I love the way that brilliant orange shows at the base, it's elegant. Strong shadows make the light even brighter, it's excellent. Beautiful painting.

Branca, your peppers are strong and warm. I like the way you reflected color into the shadows and kept even the light in the warm spectrum. Gorgeous work. I love seeing the variations on these images!

T Porter
01-22-2012, 06:10 PM
David,

Interesting painting. I like the way the shaded area under the tree canopy gives way to the light of the open park space. The painting really gives the feeling of walking out from the coolness of shade into an opening of sunlight.

Karin,

Job well done on controlling the light and graduated shadows on the eggs. I like your exploration of bringing a green into the painting. It appears that you mixed the colors using the sticks of pastels rather than blending with your fingers. How you painted the front egg shows the thinness of the eggshell nicely. I would suggest if I might to bring some of the illumination at the base of the front egg up (brighten it) to match the reflection that is under the egg. You’ve done this on the right egg and by doing this you have grounded the right egg. To me the front egg looks like it is floating. Other than that, well done.:thumbsup:

Branco,

Nice painting. I can tell that you started out with a solid drawing to begin this painting the proportions look great. The peppers definitely have the glossy appearance to them and you represented the reflective light within the shadow nicely. The larger pepper appears quite detailed while the smaller pepper looks fuzzy. I think if you brought the smaller peppers stem forward it would give your painting more depth. A simple broken line on the backside of the stem and on the top of the pepper’s body would put space between it and the yellow pepper. Only a suggestion.:)

Tom

DAK723
01-22-2012, 08:40 PM
Tom, Very nice painting of the peppers! Charlie's colorist method is definitely worth studying!

David, Very intense and full of energy!

Karin, Very nice and bold!

Branca, Really like your rendition of the peppers! Very nice!

Don

artistat38
01-23-2012, 07:38 AM
Thanks Don, Ruthie,Charlie and Jen for the words of appreciation....really encouraging....

Prashanti.

Anne Bour
01-23-2012, 09:43 AM
Hello, I just saw that after a technical problem my messages were deleted, so I return post comments. I see that this January has been very profitable, you make beautiful pastels. "Eggs" had a big succesfull and it's not easy. After, I will put my participation. Good day to you. (and sorry again for my poor english)

Anne Bour
01-23-2012, 10:22 AM
Here is my pastel for this month!!
Next, I will do eggs ........



http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Jan-2012/976152-WET_CANVAS-400.jpg

goeppeka
01-23-2012, 12:07 PM
Thank you for your nice comments, David, Robert, Don.

And thank you Tom for taking the time to explain that with the illumination and the "flying" egg. I think you are right. I will have to see how I can fix it. I think that I understand what you are saying. Brighten the illumination of the left egg. Okay, we'll do. Thank you.

robertsloan2
01-23-2012, 02:19 PM
Anne, wow! Your callas are gorgeous. I like the feel of the painting, all the subtle variegation of color is wonderful and the depth is excellent. Beautiful ellipse at the top of the vase too.

barriespapa
01-23-2012, 03:30 PM
Thanks to all for the kind comments and help very much appreciated
I porter Fantastic peppers,looking forward to seeing more of your work.
David wow very different I like it.
Karin What gorgeous eggs I just love the shadows give me the inpression the eggs are ready to hatch any minute.
Branca excellent job of the peppers.
David

Colorix
01-23-2012, 04:39 PM
David, wow, you really jazzed that one up, love it! I see a sparkling spiral of lighter blues in the dark foliage-- It is cool. Good to see an expression!

Karin, I love that glow, it does add an extra thing to the eggs. Beautiful distinction between light and shadow!

Branca, beautiful peppers, I love the solid sense of the large pepper, and the beautiful shadows.

Anne, well done callas, the shadows are good and deep, and the flowers still look sparkling white, lovely! I agree with Robert, the ellipse at the top of the vase is really well done.

DAK723
01-23-2012, 10:10 PM
Anne, Very nice painting of the callas! I like how you have harmonized the shadow colors with the background color!

All, I'm having some computer issues at the moment, so if I seem to disappear for a couple days don't fret! I hope to find out what is wrong tomorrow and how long it will take to fix it!

Don

barriespapa
01-24-2012, 04:08 PM
Sorry Anne I missed you please forgive I thought your calla lilies were terrific.
David

sarcasmo
01-24-2012, 08:25 PM
Hi everyone, great spotlight and great posts by everyone so far! This is my second post, had a bit of trouble with this one, but I'm learning. Thanks for comments, criticisms.
-John

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Jan-2012/979872-callas.JPG

stess73
01-25-2012, 07:03 AM
DOn, what an interesting post about shadows! So well explained! Thanks!

DAK723
01-25-2012, 08:47 AM
John, Thanks for joining us! Very nice painting!

stess73, Thank you for the nice comments!

Don

Greenbrier33
01-25-2012, 12:52 PM
John,
Nice flowers!

Colorix
01-25-2012, 01:37 PM
John, lovely coolish painting of the calla lilies, it feels like winter light.

elisamaria
01-25-2012, 02:11 PM
Charlie, glad you liked the glow in the rocks. Thank you!
Jen, I am happy you stepped into my painting and felt the radiating heat. I can only imagine that it was pretty hot when the ref pic was taken. Thank you for your kind comments!

elisamaria
01-25-2012, 02:28 PM
Dave, striking painting! Like the looseness and simplicity and you really invite me to dream wether I am on the earth or in the space.
Karin, wow, such glowing eggs with strong shadows. Lovely!
Branca, nice peppers! The shadows are great with lovely reflected colors too!
Ann, another beautiful painting of the Callas! Your color variegations are so good!
John, very interesting to see the Callas in another light so luminous and fresh!

Anne Bour
01-26-2012, 04:05 AM
Thanks !!
I will try to do eggs and peppers .....i'll be back (smille)

Greenbrier33
01-26-2012, 04:14 AM
Tammy,
I just wanted to point out how nice the yellow lily looks against the blue background. Nicely done.

Prashanti,
Your lily is also very nice. The red of the stamens makes them pop against the yellow.

Jen,
Great flowers! The one in the middle almost looks expressionistic; the colors are more solid and make a nice statement. I also especially like the vase cast shadow; it grays, softens, and dissolves in the distance, while the forward edge is more intense and of darker value.

robertsloan2
01-26-2012, 02:12 PM
Hi everyone, great spotlight and great posts by everyone so far! This is my second post, had a bit of trouble with this one, but I'm learning. Thanks for comments, criticisms.
-John

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Jan-2012/979872-callas.JPG

Yours is so dramatic! I like the angle, turning it so the view slants the table surface gives it a more dramatic composition. The stems are a little heavy, other than that it's utterly splendid. The light on the flowers is magnificent. The understated shadow of the vase, where you just worked around it, is great for that not being the focal area that the flowers are.

Interesting, original approach to the callas! I love seeing all the variety of interpretations on these references.

Cazza50
01-26-2012, 05:47 PM
Please don't laugh. This is my first attempt at a pure pastel painting. I used cheap pastels for this and fabriano paper. I did touch up at the end with my unisons. I think I chose the wrong side of the paper as it was quite bumpy.

I almost don't want to post this, but as I did do it, i thought it would at least be something to look back on when I improve. :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Jan-2012/965076-tulips3.jpg

Regards,

Carol

Edit: Sorry I seem to have saved the photo at a mini size, not sure what happened there.

Edited again: hopefully this will be a bigger pic

Devonlass
01-26-2012, 06:12 PM
Why on earth would you think anyone would laugh at this painting? It's really good and even more so given that it's your first one. My first efforts were not nearly as good as this. Well done.

DAK723
01-26-2012, 06:47 PM
Carol, Thanks for posting! In all seriousness, your painting is excellent! Not only will no one laugh, but no one would think this is a first pure pastel! The tulips are very nicely shaped with very vibrant colors. The shadow looks good and very realistic on the wooden fence! I wouldn't even have anything to critique!

Your uploaded pic can be up to 800 pixels in the longer direction. Even at the smaller size, it looks good!

Don

robertsloan2
01-27-2012, 02:44 AM
Carol, this is nice! I don't know what you were worried about, the painting is lovely. If you didn't say you were a beginner no one would know from these tulips. I love the texture of the petals and the way you handled the hard and soft edges in their transitions - they are very rounded and natural, the modeling shadows are elegant. The soft-edged shadows on the wall are just right, they read true and don't draw attention away from the gorgeous focal area of the blooms. You hint at the wood grain texture without describing it in distracting detail, there's just enough variation in the wood panels to make them seem wooden, with the grooves just right for wood paneling or grooves between actual boards.

Well done!

As for bumpy side versus smooth side - Fabriano does that the same way that Canson Mi-Tientes does. Test both sides on the edge if you like the smooth side better. Some artists like the bumpy side more - the right side is the side that gives the effect you want. I hated the bumpy side for years till I thought of trying it when I wanted a lot of broken color, then I enjoyed it and now I just use the side that fits what I'm doing.

Cheap pastels can work well for practice, they just usually aren't lightfast. Unisons are wonderful and lush. Glad you have both! There is a lot more variety in the textures of the artist grade brands, something I found out as I collected more pastels.

Cazza50
01-27-2012, 02:54 AM
Wow! Thank you, Robert, Don and Carol.

I guess I am so used to my family asking "What is that supposed to be?" that I thought everyone else would react in the same manner.

I have been avidly reading the forums and taking notes. But it is so different when you come to do it yourself. I am more used to coloured pencils which is why I started this "pastel period" with the pastel pencils. It was fun doing a "real" painting with pastel sticks only.

I can't wait to get better pastels to accompany my little box of unisons. I have a big bag of bits coming from across the pond to clean up and sort. With lots of softies in tons of colours I can see nothing will stop me. In the meantime I will continue playing with my cheapies to see what I can achieve.

I left it a bit late to take on this challenge this month, and I didn't have any black paper. Looking forward to trying again in February.

Regards,

Carol

elisamaria
01-27-2012, 06:49 AM
Carol, this is a very nice painting! I like your colors in the whole painting and to my eyes I see the tulips are glowing there in bright sunshine in front of a beautiful yellow curtain with nice folds giving shadows in it and good shadows of the tulips. The bumpiness in the paper in some places I my opinion is very interesting while I get the right feeling of curtain material.

Greenbrier33
01-27-2012, 07:51 AM
Carol,

I love the tulips! Very well done and I appreciate that you shared.
I made the mistake of assuming the tulips would be easy. They looked so simple in the photograph. Then I realized what a complex challenge they were to bring to life. You did it though, and impressively well.

Hoping you continue with us into next month's Challenge,
Dave

Colorix
01-27-2012, 09:18 AM
Carol, so glad you decided to post, it is "in the spirit of" to post even when we don't feel all that happy about a work. And yours is lovely! Great glow in the tulips, fine shadows. Great light on the wall!

Fabriano? their Tiziano, I think, is that right? The reverse side is slightly less bumpy. I like the Fabriano Ingres a bit better. The Unisons work well on this kind of 'ordinary' pastel paper. You might want to try your cheap pastels on some ordinary very fine sandpaper, it is amazing what the right combo of pastel and paper can do.

PS. Forgot, I should have said that we've all trembled at posting when being new here, or new at the medium. (And family... well... unless they are artists... )

Cazza50
01-27-2012, 10:06 AM
Hi Charlie,

Yes, it was Tiziano paper I used, in a pale lemon colour. I have a pack of Colourix paper too. I was just saving it until I got a bit better with these pastels.

Thank you everyone for reassuring me that I hadn't made a fool of myself. I feel more confident of joining in and posting my results now. :)

Regards,

Carol

Cazza50
01-27-2012, 10:09 AM
Dave, yes I picked the tulips thinking they would prove easiest, and learned I was wrong. I am certainly hoping to have a go at next months challenge.

Thank you for your kind comments on my tulips.

Regards,

Carol

tvandeb
01-27-2012, 11:20 AM
Jen; Gorgeous calla lily's- beautiful colors! Artistat: Beautiful vibrant colors on your lily! Elisabeth: Great textures, colors and shadows on the rocks! David: Gorgeous, so beautifully on the landscape!Branca: Great painting on the peppers; very realistic!Anne: Very beautifully done on the lily's ! Sacasmo: Very beautifully done, super details! Carol: Goregous, very real looking tulips, nice placement of shadows!!:clap: :clap: :clap:

Thanks for comments on mine. I finally quit procrastinating; and tried the eggs. I went for a softer look on the shadows. Done on a scrap piece of uart paper with various softies and carb-othell pastel pencils.. Thanks for the Great refs and lessons this month Don!!!http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jan-2012/71359-spotlite-jan.-eggs_and_shadows-Pastel-01.27.12.jpg

T Porter
01-27-2012, 02:20 PM
I almost don't want to post this, but as I did do it, i thought it would at least be something to look back on when I improve. :)


I like your attitude. No fear!




Nice painting of the eggs, Tammy.

Ruthie57
01-27-2012, 04:18 PM
I've been around but no time to post. So here goes...

David I love your road and trees with the wild colours. The values are right though aren't they. Great shadows!

Karin, Oh your Eggs appear to be glowing from within! They look magical.

Branca, Another great Pepper painting! The shadows read really well and the stalk on the main pepper is brilliantly done!

Anne, Lovely Callas! I agree that the elipse at the top of the vase is really good.

John, your Callas are spectacular! I love the glow in the background behind them. I wonder why you chose to leave the shadow solid colour?

Carol, good for you for posting it even though you were nervous! And excellent Tulips for a first piece too! I don't think I've encountered anyone on WC who would laugh at an artist for their efforts. This place is full of encouragement :)

Tammy, lovely delicate Eggs!

I doubt I'll have time for any more this month. However, I have to say again Don what a great lesson this has been. Thank you! It has brought new "spotlighters" out of the woodwork so to speak :D I hope you'll all join us again next month!

Mario V
01-28-2012, 03:49 PM
So many inspiring works :clap: I could not resist to join in :)

Thanks Don for yet another great lesson!!!


size: 28x38 cm (11x17") on black Canson MT
Sens and Unison pastels

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Jan-2012/133719-1201pas-Kala.jpg

Greenbrier33
01-28-2012, 04:08 PM
Mario,

Dramatic. Excellent. Love how the callas jump toward the viewer, while the background sinks away. Verrrry nice.

Dave

Ruthie57
01-28-2012, 04:11 PM
Hey Mario!! :wave: Wow, that's great! Love the way you've used the black paper to bring real drama to this piece. Great to see you here too!

T Porter
01-28-2012, 06:12 PM
Mario,

Very dynamic painting, I like it!

DAK723
01-28-2012, 09:43 PM
Tammy, Nice job on the eggs! I think the softer shadow works fine and gives a totally different mood to the painting!

Mario, Thanks for joining us! A very strong and bold painting!

Don

robertsloan2
01-28-2012, 10:02 PM
Wow! Thank you, Robert, Don and Carol.

I guess I am so used to my family asking "What is that supposed to be?" that I thought everyone else would react in the same manner.

I have been avidly reading the forums and taking notes. But it is so different when you come to do it yourself. I am more used to coloured pencils which is why I started this "pastel period" with the pastel pencils. It was fun doing a "real" painting with pastel sticks only.

I can't wait to get better pastels to accompany my little box of unisons. I have a big bag of bits coming from across the pond to clean up and sort. With lots of softies in tons of colours I can see nothing will stop me. In the meantime I will continue playing with my cheapies to see what I can achieve.

I left it a bit late to take on this challenge this month, and I didn't have any black paper. Looking forward to trying again in February.

Regards,

Carol

Unisons are among the better pastels, one of the best. If you bought Deborah Secor's Big Bag O' Bits you'll have a glorious collection. I was drooling at that. You'll probably find some pieces of Unisons in it.

Cheap ones are fun to sketch with though. I loved how your tulips came out and I'm pleasantly surprised you used lemon yellow paper - it's got to have a wonderful glow in person!

Don't get scared of using the Colourfix paper though. In my experience it stands up very well to brushing out and reworking. The coated surface is very sturdy. You'll find sanded paper gives you the ability to do more layering and more texture. I'd say stick to the good pastels on it though, so your results will be lasting.

I bought Colourfix primers too. That lets me turn any cheap watercolour pad into practice paper with the same sweet surface as my good Colourfix paper and a pint of it isn't too expensive.

robertsloan2
01-28-2012, 10:09 PM
Tammy, your soft-shadowed eggs are lovely. The diffuse edges are perfect, they seem so very natural. What you did by lowering the contrast was change the lighting - your painting looks like you just flicked the overhead light on along with the brilliant light streaming from an unseen window. Gorgeous eggs. The subtle hue shifts in the shading are great.

Mario - WOW! Fantastic ellipses on the vase. Ellipses and three dimensional vases are tough even for experts. You got that vase spot on. Beautiful texture on it too. Love your color harmonies. Love the drama of the black paper you used, the painting is light-filled and lively while the black gives it a punch nothing else could. The light in your painting is magnificent - very dramatic light, those strong shadow and highlight contrasts made yours like it's set up at night with one ferocious spotlight describing everything. Glorious effect. Perfect form and beautiful texture. Lovely colors too, the subtle tints are really nice on the background and the light areas.

Both of you wound up interpreting the photos in ways that changed the lighting, both dramatic changes that read true. Beautiful.

Pippa
01-29-2012, 06:56 PM
Well I am very late to this thread, but I took a stab at the eggs, using pan pastels on grey canson, about 8 x 11 inches. I'd never tried the pans on canson before, and I made a nice muddy mess of the two eggs on the left. I'm pleased with the egg on the right.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Jan-2012/88887-eggs.JPG

robertsloan2
01-29-2012, 07:44 PM
Pippa, all three of your eggs are gorgeous. I don't see the mess in the eggs on the left, they are beautiful. The one on the right is spectacular with lots of reflected color but so are the other two. I love your shadows. Your soft-edged layered shadows are so beautiful. The whole painting is a beauty, it's a small piece of finite perfection. Seriously. Frame this one. It's fantastic.

Turpintine45
01-29-2012, 08:50 PM
Pippa, I have to agree with Robert it is a lovely painting and not a bit of mud anywhere.
Sorry I have got way behind on commenting again. So many great paintings from so many people. This has been a very productive month. Well done all of you!!

T Porter
01-29-2012, 11:35 PM
Pippa,

We are our own worst critics. I sure don’t see any mud. I like the multitude of colors that you’ve brought into your painting. The reflective light and the gradation to darker shadows is well done. Your eggs are very three-dimensional. Nice work.:thumbsup:

elisamaria
01-30-2012, 08:25 AM
Tammy, nice work again, lovely very natural looking eggs, soft and delicate! Thanks for you kind comments too.
Mario, your painting made me immediately say, wow! Great and love your drama in it!
Pippa, beautiful eggs! I agree so much with all the others that I cannot see any mud but only lovely colors.

DAK723
01-30-2012, 08:32 AM
Pippa, Thanks for joining us! A wonderful job on the eggs! All 3 eggs are wonderfully painted - very little difference between them! Whatever struggle you had with 2 of them isn't noticeable in the final result!

Don

CM Neidhofer
01-30-2012, 03:33 PM
Here's my second entry this month!! I'm on a roll! lol Looks a little blurry to me. Anyway, really, really wanted to do these mountains and wasn't sure I'd make it in time, but I'm calling it finished. Looking forward to next month!

9 x 12 PastelMat with mostly Ludwig's. I used two of his "confetti" sticks for the mountains. I've been waiting for something to come along that these would work for, and these mountains were perfect for them!

robertsloan2
01-30-2012, 07:59 PM
Christine, I love the vegetation. That came out so natural and beautiful. Gorgeous painting. Thanks for mentioning you used the Confetti Terry Ludwigs on the rocks - they came out beautiful and it's a neat effect! Rocks are gorgeous and I love the recession between the formations.

journeysketcher
01-30-2012, 09:11 PM
Thank you for the detailed lesson on shadows, and great references. I think I may need to go over the information again. :)

DAK723
01-30-2012, 09:25 PM
Christine, Very nice job on the rocks!

There were a ton of paintings this month - by far our most successful Spotlight!

Here they are in gallery form! I sincerely hope I didn't miss any. My apologies if I did.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jan-2012/82335-peppers.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jan-2012/82335-eggs.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jan-2012/82335-flowers.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jan-2012/82335-tulips.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jan-2012/82335-landscapes.jpg

There's still one more day this month, so if you have any new paintings to post, please do so - it just won't make the gallery.

Absolutely great paintings from everyone!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

Don

T Porter
01-31-2012, 01:02 AM
Dang-it I was too slow for the gallery! Great collection of paintings from everyone and what a cool feature to see them all on one page. Thanks again Don for your efforts.


19.5" 19.5" Light green paper.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-Jan-2012/500091-January_Shadow_Study_Desert_Landscape.jpg

elisamaria
01-31-2012, 06:31 AM
Don, what a pleasant surprise with the gallery and really interesting. My reaction was, wow, that is so beautiful. Thank you so much for this fantastic thread and I am looking forward to next month.:heart:

Christine and Tom great rocks!

beetee
01-31-2012, 09:31 AM
Don,
the gallery is the biz!!

Brian

Ruthie57
01-31-2012, 12:20 PM
Wow! The gallery looks great! What a lovely surprise to come back to! Well done everyone. See you all next month, I hope.

Judibelle
01-31-2012, 12:26 PM
Ditto what Ruthie said! Love it!

Turpintine45
01-31-2012, 12:35 PM
Christine and Tom. Rocking rocks! They both came out splendidly. Christine do confetti pastels have swirls of colour like the CP's we used to get in our stockings at Christmas? Sounds like fun and they made a great effect.
Don thanks for the wonderful gallery. I wish I could have got more in but hopefully next month!

spirothet
01-31-2012, 01:03 PM
The Gallery looks spectacular! My only regret is that I procrastinated so much that I only painted eggs. I've popped in and out of WC this month that I commented only on a few paintings, but I have to admit that there is tremendous talent here supporting one another. Kudos to everyone's work! Don, great lesson and reference photos this month.

Colorix
01-31-2012, 02:09 PM
Christine, Tom, wonderful!

Don, thank you for doing the galleries! (they do take a lot of time, and keeping track of everyone isn't easy) They look so wonderful together. (Didja get my reply, or was it eaten by cybergremlins?)

robertsloan2
01-31-2012, 06:22 PM
Wow! Fantastic Gallery, Don! Thank you for creating it. Wonderful seeing all the different variations side by side like that.

T.Porter, gorgeous view of the grand red rocks scene! That's fantastic.

DAK723
01-31-2012, 09:14 PM
Tom, Wonderful painting of the rocks!

I'd just like to take a moment to thank everyone for their participation in the Spotlight! It is your enthusiasm and encouragement that makes this thread a success!

Don

CM Neidhofer
01-31-2012, 10:19 PM
Christine do confetti pastels have swirls of colour like the CP's we used to get in our stockings at Christmas? Sounds like fun and they made a great effect.
Don thanks for the wonderful gallery. I wish I could have got more in but hopefully next month!

Yes, more or less. Small streaks of a different color mixed within the base color. I have kind of a light and dark reddish/beige with streaks of red in them. Took the first stroke with one and had that "Aha!" moment! Perfect for those red rocks.