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JPQ
01-24-2012, 05:25 PM
Does anyone use there only 6 colour palette ? if what colours you use. and i mainly ask people which paints landscapes,and flowers and abstract things.
My art budjet is maybe more limited soon. and i prefer artist quality paints and full pans. two reasons why i maybe must limit my palette to very small. and what i tested colours what i own i think even with six colours i can get wide range colours. even good orange and violet...

virgil carter
01-24-2012, 06:16 PM
J, a six paint palette is a very good limited palette and should allow mixing of almost any desired color. It will be a little slower and the paint will have a little less intensity, but otherwise it should be a good approach for painting.

Here's the recommendations from Handprint (of course everyone has their own favorites):

primary light yellow : benzimidazolone yellow (PY154) or hansa yellow medium (PY97)
secondary red orange : pyrrole orange (PO73) or cadmium scarlet (PR108)
primary magenta : quinacridone magenta (PR122) or quinacridone rose ("permanent rose", PV19)
secondary blue violet : ultramarine blue (PB29) or cobalt blue deep (PB73)
primary cyan : phthalocyanine blue GS (PB15) or phthalocyanine cyan (PB17)
secondary blue green : phthalocyanine green BS (PG7) or phthalocyanine green YS (PG36)

Good luck!
Virgil

JPQ
01-24-2012, 07:38 PM
i going avoid cadmiums maybe (their opacity). and Schminckes Cobalt Green Dark is one my special colours actually now maybe my basic green even reason its grunalation makes lively greens and mixes also to my taste very natural greens. and my idea is boring classic two yellows,two reds,two blues. btw i dont much care earths. and i made few painttings now with ultramarine violet which seems usefull colour even making greens. and i now know i dont need W&N davys grey looks like i cannot mix anything usefull with it and in pure hue is not very usefull when we can mix own greys. and next pratices are going for greys... all others areas i can imagine easily what i get even my current big palette. and reason whole thing prices rise and moneys are going smaller i think in sametime...

virgil carter
01-24-2012, 07:43 PM
If you are going to use a 6 color palette, with 2 of each primary, you will have a lot more mixing to do than using 6 colors from around the color wheel. And you'll lose some intensity or saturation in your mixes. But it's an old and traditional approach to use a warm-cool combination of red, yellow and blue.

Whatever works!

Sling paint!
Virgil

painterbear
01-24-2012, 10:11 PM
Hi JPQ,

Check out this thread about the Split Primary Color Palette (http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=423142) which consists of a warm and cool tone of each of the three primary colors. My instructor, Nita Leland, also adds a 7th color Burnt Sienna which she calls the "magic color" because it is so useful to mix with the other colors.

With that limited palette, you should be able to mix a wide variety of colors.

Happy painting.

Sylvia

pumkin54
01-24-2012, 11:58 PM
I don't really do a split primary, although that was originally my intention when I started painting. I find that I've ended up with a limited palette anyway just from the habits I've developed.

My workhorses are Ultramarine Blue, Alizarin Crimson, Cadmium Yellow Med and Burnt Sienna. I do entire paintings with just two or three of those colors. Cerulean Blue, Lemon Yellow and Cad Red Deep were supposed to be the other colors in my split primary. I use them maybe 25% of the time. I also have Payne's Gray, not because I need it but just because I love the color. I use it for monochromes.

Of course I've only been painting for a few months and I assume that I will eventually add more colors. But you're right. Not only is a limited palette more budget friendly, it's also easier to learn a few colors really well rather than have 25 colors and be like :confused:

virgil carter
01-25-2012, 12:02 AM
Interestingly (to me at least), in the Reniassance, green was considered a primary color, along with yellow, red and blue.

There are so many approaches to color theory. Be careful or your eyes will cross!

Here's the opposing view of using split complementary colors: http://channeling-winslow-homer.com/a-rational-palette-index-to-chapters/chapter-one-2/chapter-two-eye-candy-avoiding-monotomy/chapter-three-mixing-convenience/chapter-four-saturation-costs/five-is-the-saturated-palette-what-we-want/six-the-extremely-limited-palette/seven-primary-color-palette-myth/eight-split-primary-palette/

I hope this doesn't start a color theory war...

Sling theory!
Virgil

earthnut
01-25-2012, 12:40 AM
I'm pretty new to watercolors but I'm leaning towards a palette with two parts:

Granulating colors, namely Yellow Ochre, Venetian Red, and Ultramarine Blue
Staining colors, namely Benz Yellow (PY151), Quin Rose (PV19), and Thalo Blue (PB15:3)

There are some other colors I'm dabbling in, but those seem the best workhorses. A minimal palette in both, but allowing interesting texture differences too. I want to do plein air paintings and am attracted to earthy pigments.

pumkin54
01-25-2012, 02:36 AM
I hope this doesn't start a color theory war...

Sling theory!
Virgil I posit that the only primary colors are black and white. Discuss. :lol:

virgil carter
01-25-2012, 10:06 AM
OK, I'll bite! P, why do you say black and white are the only primary colors?

Sling color!
Virgil

noge
01-25-2012, 12:46 PM
I have more than 6 in my palette -

but painting winter landscape I usually use not more than 3 - 4

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Jan-2012/148675-IMG_4314.JPG

JPQ
01-25-2012, 01:05 PM
I have more than 6 in my palette -

but painting winter landscape I usually use not more than 3 - 4

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Jan-2012/148675-IMG_4314.JPG


what colours you have dont look basic 12colour set to my eyes oops you have 14 colours but still i want know what are colours if you remember.:)

ps. i dont paint winter landscapes often i prefer autumn/fall (i love oranges,reds and yellows in treens...) and summer. in this order.

O Solis
01-25-2012, 01:19 PM
I use only primary colors from MaimeriBlu:

Primary Cyan
Primary Magenta
Primary Yellow

plus a tube of Permanent White Gouche from W&N which is only used for things like highlights, stars, etc.

I make all my paintings from these paints. When I do acrylics (rarely now) I use the same four paints.

Oscar

Ellen in Ont
01-25-2012, 01:20 PM
I started out with a palette of the three primaries and didn't add to it until I understood their properties really well. I chose transparent colours, Quinn gold, permanent alizarin, and ultramarine blue. I was able to mix just about any other colour and intensity from those. What I started adding next were earth colours.

kate252
01-25-2012, 02:07 PM
ultramarine blue
a;irizon crimson
cadmium red
lemon yellow


those are my usual- i jujst use them

this week ive bought hookers green and "intense blue" (what a joke- it should be called "wierd greeney blue"


and i have black and white- which i am avoiding at the moment- white opaques everything- and black deadens it

Marcio C
01-25-2012, 02:22 PM
The common approach is to use split primaries (already mentioned above) approach, with two yellows, two reds and two blues.
But another very effective alternative is to use the Munsell system of five principal colors: yellow, red, violet, blue and green (for instance PY150, PR209, PV23, PB15 and PG7). It produces pretty clear mixes, and leaves you room for one other convenience color, such as an earth or a black/gray.
With the primary option, you mix a warm blue with a cool red to reach a violet; in the Munsell option, you mix blue with violet to reach a warm blue, you mix green with your blue to cool it down, etc.
Just wanted to point out another option, not necessarily advocating either.

The choice of colors is very personal, it depends a lot on which colors you prefer to mix and which you prefer to use unmixed, what atmosphere/mood you go for, etc.

Some other thoughts:
Alvaro Castagnet paints mostly with six colors: yellow ochre, ultramarine blue, permanent alizarin crimson, plus some cobalt blue, burnt sienna and cadmium red (or another variation of those three colors).

My workhorse six are: yellow ochre, burnt sienna, cobalt blue, ultramarine blue, azo yellow and cadmium red light

The smallest set I use is five colors (all Daniel Smith): Quinacridone gold, new gamboge, quinacridone coral, indanthrene blue and sap green. I can mix the gold and coral to get a burnt sienna tone, and mix blue for darks. It works pretty well.

As you can see, you can benefit from having multiple small sets. I change mine over time (or even each time, as I work with pans).

I'd say go out and paint, only take six colors with you each time you go. That will give you lots of experience in mixing your paints and find out what they can and cannot do, and will overtime show you which are the ones you keep missing or going back to.

JPQ
01-25-2012, 08:11 PM
In here its hard found place where i can freely paint. and maybe six is too limited and i now remember i dont need change my all colours same time actually now i only need soon basic warm yellow (py65 i think)... i use it more than my basic cool yellow (py3) becouse i often make even greens with py65. but some oranges i made even with p3. and i use other yellows actually i dont remember them all. and i have small box when i can put about 6-8 half pans i think if i someday make portable set.

pumkin54
01-26-2012, 12:13 AM
OK, I'll bite! P, why do you say black and white are the only primary colors?

Sling color!
Virgil :eek: Oh, I have to have a reason?? :eek:

:lol:

noge
01-26-2012, 03:48 AM
what colours you have dont look basic 12colour set to my eyes oops you have 14 colours but still i want know what are colours if you remember.:)

ps. i dont paint winter landscapes often i prefer autumn/fall (i love oranges,reds and yellows in treens...) and summer. in this order.



Yes you are right - the use of colors is going with the season
But its makes not much sense to talk about the number of the colors
Watercolor is practice ,practice , oractice ...

Show us more of your waterclors - one picture can tell us more than 1000 words:wave:

JPQ
01-26-2012, 10:47 AM
I must post someday my works... here and other place here (pastel area). but not for coloured pencils.(why? i dont like my coloured pencil works much)...

karenlee
01-26-2012, 06:08 PM
Wow egon! What a lovely Schmincke set! I'm drooling over those nice large pans!!!

alansam
01-28-2012, 12:20 PM
I think it is a good idea to try a limited palette ,I have an old winsor and newton palette ,I have never used ,,a three well type .it would hold six large pans nicely ,Campbell smith uses one in his videos,and as you may know Ted wesson .only used six colours ,and he was quite good/// James fletcher watson
twelve .Ron Ranson ,,steve hall //all limited palettes

PCool
01-29-2012, 11:20 AM
Marcio,
Years ago, Daler Rowney made/sold a 6 color pan palette. The colors were/are (were: because it may not be around anymore), are (because I still have the palette: Hooker's Green, no1; French Ultramarine; cadmium Yellow; Yellow Ochre; Crimson Alizarin; and Cadmium Red).
Peg

noge
01-30-2012, 02:58 AM
This are only 2 colours (liquid watercolors ) fir green + deep orange

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jan-2012/148675-Test.jpg

kate252
01-30-2012, 02:38 PM
i always paintwith about six colours- i used to use black- but now i just mix all my colors together to make back instead- if i mix blue- yellow and red- it can make a black- if you pick the darker hues.

that black is a dead- no color- its strange

painterbear
01-30-2012, 06:15 PM
Kate,
I think you are on the right track mixing your colors to make a deep tone like black. Tube blacks tend to deaden paintings for sure.

Another way to get dark tones is to mix complementary colors as Egon has done in his example painting.

Sylvia

pumkin54
01-30-2012, 06:25 PM
I was very surprised on the first day of my watercolor class. The teacher had us create tints by adding water and shades by adding...black! I guess that is what a shade technically is, but I had always read to darken a color using its complement. I of course didn't say anything, but I'm still secretly using the complement.

painterbear
01-30-2012, 07:04 PM
I'm surprised by that as well, pumkin. Even though it is your teacher, I would tend to discount the advice to add black to darken a color unless you are painting in class and that is what this particular teacher expects you to do.

I don't even own a tube of black any more. Mix my dark tones from the other colors, French Ultramarine Blue + Burnt Sienna, for example.

Sylvia

virgil carter
01-31-2012, 01:32 AM
Pumpkin, your teacher was focusing on tints, tones and shades. It may be a bit technical, but it's a classical painting method for how to modify and change hues.

Tints=diluting a hue (or adding white), resulting in a hue with less intensity/saturation and lighter value than pure paint;
Tone=adding gray or a complementary color to a hue, resulting in a hue with less intensity/saturation and a darker value;
Shade=adding black to a hue, resulting in a hue with less intensity/saturation and a darker value.

There's a fine line between tones and shades, but in terms of a painting's color harmony, it may be more harmonious to use complementary hues in a painting to neutralize a given hue, than to introduce gray or black.

A couple of direct applications using tints, tones and shades include:

Painting in all tones or shades for a subtle, understated painting effect (one tonalist approach);
Painting with small areas of pure color or tints, juxtaposed with large areas of complementary tones for a highly energized and luminous painting (one colorist approach). This is known as simultaneous contrast.Obviously there are other applications and approaches.

Sling paint!
Virgil

pumkin54
01-31-2012, 04:09 AM
Honestly, I don't think her purpose was as complicated as that. I think she was just trying to show a bunch of newbies the easiest way to darken a color without having to explain the color wheel and complementary colors. One method took 5 seconds, the other would've taken 10 minutes.

virgil carter
01-31-2012, 09:57 AM
Just add black.

OK.

Sling quickly!
Virgil

Neeman
02-03-2012, 07:27 AM
Marcio,
Years ago, Daler Rowney made/sold a 6 color pan palette. The colors were/are (were: because it may not be around anymore), are (because I still have the palette: Hooker's Green, no1; French Ultramarine; cadmium Yellow; Yellow Ochre; Crimson Alizarin; and Cadmium Red).
Peg

This is a typical English 6 color palette
Sometimes Light Red instead of Cad Red

JPQ
02-05-2012, 08:03 PM
there is no correct thing for palette i think depends subjects and this english palette looks me mainly for landscapes palette. and my paletter is going be maybe mainly for fantasy nature mainly flowers and birds.

Yorky
02-06-2012, 03:32 AM
Well, I have lots of colours on my palette, but on my last painting I used Winsor Blue, Prussian Blue, Ultramarine Blue, Transparent Yellow, Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna, and some very pale Turquoise for the water.

Doug

JPQ
02-06-2012, 04:49 AM
makes think what is this turquoise one idea is cobalt turquoise what i have is very light hue but to me is not pale at least variant what i have. and my last paintting have only 5 colours i dont remember pigment names but one is pg36,and others are three reds,orange. weird set i know but pg36 and third red is used for grey.others for sky...

Yorky
02-06-2012, 04:51 AM
I added the Turquoise to my palette recently - trying to be a "bit more adventurous" :lol:

Doug

JPQ
02-07-2012, 06:18 AM
I added the Turquoise to my palette recently - trying to be a "bit more adventurous" :lol:

Doug

what pigment it is ? or at least colour name and brand.

Yorky
02-07-2012, 06:39 AM
W&N Cobalt Turquoise, PB36. I added a couple of bright colours to my palette as an experiment.

Doug

alansam
04-14-2012, 11:20 AM
in the 18th century there were some fabulous paintings by cotman ,de wint, and others , using a limited palette , mostly earth colours ,turner started using his yellows and blues as he got older,(,I use a limited palette ..but I dont use yellow ochre .or the brown pink de wint used ), //brown pink??
what colour is near to it ??

Bobar57
04-15-2012, 11:48 PM
I understand color mixing and how a limited palette works,but in my humble opinion,a limited palette is convenient and adequate in countries of Europe as England where muted colors had been used by centuries with a good reason,the weather calls for them.I live in a tropical zone,lots of colorful places,my palette will take as many colors as it can handle,the brighter the better,if a dull color is called for always can be achieved by proper mixing.

Bob

Mayberry
04-16-2012, 03:47 AM
in the 18th century there were some fabulous paintings by cotman ,de wint, and others , using a limited palette , mostly earth colours ,turner started using his yellows and blues as he got older,(,I use a limited palette ..but I dont use yellow ochre .or the brown pink de wint used ), //brown pink??
what colour is near to it ??

Brown pink was a color made from berries or other plant materials. And at that time "pink" meant a yellow color. Brown pink refered to a darker, browner shade of yellow made from these plant materials.

Stil-de-grain also refered to a yellow color made from berries, and sometimes brown pink is considered to mean a dark shade of stil-de-grain.

The Natural Pigments website has an interesting article on historical pigments refered to as "pink." http://naturalpigments.com/blog/2008/09/pink-is-yellow.html

pumkin54
04-16-2012, 07:55 PM
It's funny, the colors in my limited palette have already changed since I first responded to this post. I now use primarily cerulean blue, alizarin crimson, nickel azo yellow and viridian green! I wonder what it will be next month.

noge
04-17-2012, 03:57 AM
IMHO The number of colors in your box doesnt matter :evil:
and they allways change with the season

The reason for a limitted palette is : easier to create a color harmony

A 36 color box looks so great :evil: but you need years of practice to master ist :music:

Marmsk
04-19-2012, 04:11 PM
Where I studied art, black was shunned for killing colour. We were forbidden to use it. True watercolour did not use black!!!

claude j greengrass
04-19-2012, 05:59 PM
I understand color mixing and how a limited palette works,but in my humble opinion,a limited palette is convenient and adequate in countries of Europe as England where muted colors had been used by centuries with a good reason,the weather calls for them.I live in a tropical zone,lots of colorful places,my palette will take as many colors as it can handle,the brighter the better,if a dull color is called for always can be achieved by proper mixing.

Bob In my humble opinion, you are mistaken. Europe and England, as you put it, are very colourful. Have a look at some of JMW Turners (http://search.linuxmint.com/search?link=images&query=jmw+turner) paintings. Also a limited palette doesn't imply a muted palette.

pumkin54
04-19-2012, 11:57 PM
I understand color mixing and how a limited palette works,but in my humble opinion,a limited palette is convenient and adequate in countries of Europe as England where muted colors had been used by centuries with a good reason,the weather calls for them.I live in a tropical zone,lots of colorful places,my palette will take as many colors as it can handle,the brighter the better,if a dull color is called for always can be achieved by proper mixing.

Bob Yeah, I'm confused how limited palette somehow came to equal muted and dull? They are most definitely not one and the same. I use a limited palette and I think my stuff is pretty colorful. And some of the most beautiful vibrant places I've visited were in Europe. Is Ireland not known for its lush green hills? Paris in springtime with the trees covered in pink, purple and white blossoms. One of the most beautiful sights I've ever seen.

Unless the colors in a person's limited palette are confined to blacks and grays, I fail to see how that statement has any basis in reality. And I bet a skilled artist could make even a gray and black painting vibrant and lively.

Marmsk
04-20-2012, 08:07 AM
Here, here!

sashntash
04-20-2012, 10:01 AM
While I agree that a limited paletee does not necessarily equate to a muted painting, I do understand what Bobar57 meant.

If one is painting in a tropical setting with vibrant turquoise waters, houses painted all types of pinks, blues, oranges and mint greens and flowers of all colors bursting forth everywhere, parrots of magnificent colors, etc ....... then one would be using far brighter, more vibrant colors than James Fletcher-Watson ever used painting the English countryside !!!!!

And that tropical painting would, IMHO, be difficult to achieve with the typical limited palette. I would be needing some of those gorgeous vibrant colors that W & N and Daniel Smith make.... :D

I love color.. the more the better.. the brighter and more vibrant the better.....

My limited palette consists of 14 colors :lol: and I have 30 colors that I use on a regular basis... not in one painting, of course, but 30 colors to choose from as needed.... lol

Cyntada
04-21-2012, 02:59 AM
And I bet a skilled artist could make even a gray and black painting vibrant and lively.
Pat did just that (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=953713), repeatedly, with Jet Black and touches of Perylene Maroon in her Love and War series. So many of us run away from black paint, and she made it sing.

And that tropical painting would, IMHO, be difficult to achieve with the typical limited palette.
For the most part I agree, though it depends on the limits, and the palette.

Most inexpensive desktop color printers give you photographic-quality prints in eye-popping color with just four inks: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. (Most professional printing presses, turning out magazines and color book pages, use the same.) Try a painting with phthalo blue green shade (PB15:3) or even better phthalo turquoise (PB16), Quinacridone Rose (PV19) and Nickel Azo Yellow (PY150). Brilliant tropical colors? You bet! Limited? Sure, it's the same colors the printer uses, minus one! :lol:

That's one extremely specific limited palette though. I do many a sketch with Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber, which makes for the liveliest possible grays, but tropical colors? Um, no. Not with just those two. ;)

For the record I stick with limited palettes not because I'm some kind of snob or a purist... it's because I just don't have a very good eye for color, really, and keeping it limited simplifies the color harmony issues quite a bit. So for me, six colors is about double what I often use! Sometimes I hit 4 or 5 if there's something that really begs for a pigment of its own (Bird of Paradise plants get me reaching for Pyrrole Orange every time) but even then I start feeling twitchy :eek: My palette has 26 wells so I can have my pick of which two or three paints to dip into, depending on what I sit down in front of that day! :wave:

Bobar57
04-21-2012, 03:48 AM
While I agree that a limited paletee does not necessarily equate to a muted painting, I do understand what Bobar57 meant.

If one is painting in a tropical setting with vibrant turquoise waters, houses painted all types of pinks, blues, oranges and mint greens and flowers of all colors bursting forth everywhere, parrots of magnificent colors, etc ....... then one would be using far brighter, more vibrant colors than James Fletcher-Watson ever used painting the English countryside !!!!!

And that tropical painting would, IMHO, be difficult to achieve with the typical limited palette. I would be needing some of those gorgeous vibrant colors that W & N and Daniel Smith make.... :D

I love color.. the more the better.. the brighter and more vibrant the better.....

My limited palette consists of 14 colors :lol: and I have 30 colors that I use on a regular basis... not in one painting, of course, but 30 colors to choose from as needed.... lol
Thank you Susan.At least one person understand me.:)

Bob

sashntash
04-21-2012, 10:44 AM
You're welcome Bob :)

I think the problem with a discussion of limited palettes is the definition. We each have our own definition. For some it is 3 colors, for some it is 6, for me it is 14 :cool:.... yes.. I know... not really a limited palette.

Anyway.... the first thing that pops into my mind when I see the phrase "limited palette" is the colors that an artist like James Fletcher-Watson used which I think of as the typical traditional British watercolor landscape palette.

And.. don't get me wrong... I love the traditional British watercolor landscape paintings. That's what drew me to watercolor painting in the first place. British and Australian - I started with James Fletcher-Watson DVDs, then Robert Wade, John Yardley, etc.

However, I have since moved on to Shirley Trevena (also British) who uses much brighter colors.... Colors that James Fletcher-Watson would never have used.

In short.. my point is... that I immediately think of James Fletcher-Watson type paintings when I think of a "limited palette", but as Cyntada so rightly points out....

"Try a painting with phthalo blue green shade (PB15:3) or even better phthalo turquoise (PB16), Quinacridone Rose (PV19) and Nickel Azo Yellow (PY150). Brilliant tropical colors? You bet! Limited? Sure, it's the same colors the printer uses, minus one! :lol: "

Now that's my idea of a limited palette .... lol :lol:

ETA: I guess I need to revise the definition of a "limited palette" in my own mind to be strictly defined by the number of paints used.... not the particular colors chosen as Cyntada has shown me.... I'm going to try that limited palette.... sounds like great fun !!! Thanks Cyntada....

Cyntada
04-21-2012, 04:05 PM
And so I now understand each of you a little better too :wave: I was indeed thinking simply in terms of "only a few unique pigments" with the options wide open as to what those several pigments might be. Obviously if we're talking "limited to lovely muted earth pigments" then Bob, your tropical scene would be difficult indeed!

Susan, I would love to see your "limited palette" painting. Will you post it sometime?

CharM
04-21-2012, 11:53 PM
Learning to mix your colour and limiting your palette in your paintings generally helps create harmony... just a rule of thumb...

Sometimes, mixes are much more interesting than our tube colours. For instance... you could use burnt umber if you needed a rich, deep brown. OR... your could drop a little ultramarine blue into your burnt sienna... now, the colour is still rich brown, but it has blue notes that seem to give it life and energy.

Dioxazine purple is a beautiful violet... but... mix ultramarine blue with your PV19 red (Quin Rose or Permanent Alizarin) and you'll not only create a beautiful violet, but it'll have interesting red or blue hues...

Participating in the Triads Classroom a couple of years ago was a huge benefit in helping me understand what I could do with an extremely limited palette... it's exciting to discover what can be done with only 3 (any three) primaries + burnt sienna.

One of my favourite mixes is green and red. Mix up a beautiful green from one of your blues and yellows... then, add a red to it... you'll achieve a rich maroon or a deep brown or an olive green, depending on the bias of your original colours and the ratios of each of those pigments used in your mixes. The versatility of these two colours is almost overwhelming! :)

Understanding the bias of your colours and how to use that to your advantage in mixing bright clear colours or useful neutrals (your greys and browns) is important in working with a limited palette. Take the time to do this because it will pay off in spades!

noge
04-22-2012, 04:28 AM
[quote=sashntash]You're welcome Bob :)

I think the problem with a discussion of limited palettes is the definition. We each have our own definition. For some it is 3 colors, for some it is 6, for me it is 14 :cool:.... yes.. I know... not really a limited palette.

Now that's my idea of a limited palette .... lol :lol:




I am unable to master 14 colors, but I dont count them
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1092292


:wave: One of the few priciples of design is color harmony (E. Withney)


IMHO If you get a "good" price for a painting nobody will talk about the number of colors you used ;)

PierceClark
04-22-2012, 03:51 PM
This thread is VERY interesting to me.
2012 will be presenting several trips and one of them for sure will be on an airplane; so, I REALLY need to trim things down.

Thanks to all!

That said, I agree with all who are not using black. There are so many more colorful ways to achieve darks!! Paint outside, in the air, and you will see colors in your dark areas. Paint from a photo, and you will see black in dark areas (kinda boring in my opinion). In my watercolor classes in Troy, at the TROY HAYNER CULTURAL CENTER, I always start my beginners with a full "free" palette of many colors, both transparent and granulating. These are professional grade. I cut no corners and my students love what they are learning.

alansam
09-10-2012, 01:03 PM
any one know the colours edward seago used
I would love to know

Tred
09-11-2012, 07:23 AM
Alan,
Ranson doesn't mention Seago's palette in either his book on Seago or the segment in "Watercolour Impressionists". If it were readily available I'm sure Ron would have mentioned it.
There may be some clues in Seago's "A Canvas to Cover" which I will have to re-read to investigate.
We can, however assume that his palette would be very similar to Ted Wesson's. Earth colours Sienna's and Umber's, Yellow orche - Prussian, Ultramarine, Cobalt and Light Red. Once he left the big skys, marshes and estuarys of Norfolk for warmer climes no doubt exotic colours were added to his palette - Alizarin Crimson, Vermilion etc.
I'll skip through "A Canvas to Cover" to see what colours he mentions.
Cheers
Tred

alansam
09-11-2012, 08:04 AM
Tred .I have read that he used indian red ..he did look like he used a pink tone .what do you think ? mind you indian red can be a tone different in some makers //and he could have been using one of the older european paint makers .
.I have a book on order .called// Seago /A Wider Canvas by Jean Goodman .// have you read it ?

all the best
alan

CreativelyMe
09-11-2012, 10:14 AM
I started by using just 6, or 7, if you add burnt sienna to it. I had a cool and a warm of each primary. I have since added Hooker's green and burnt umber to that. I haven't really ran into feeling like I needed another color in order to get what I want. Not yet, anyway.

Tred
09-11-2012, 12:20 PM
Alan,
I have kept away from the two Goodman books. I think "A Wider Canvas" doesn't deal with his painting as much as "The Other Side of the Canvas". Let me know what you think of it
Indian Red is a stainer which can readily turn to mud. Anyone who has studied Jeanne Dobie and uses her original palette soon becomes aware to use the colour sparingly.
Cheers
Tred

circledw
09-11-2012, 04:57 PM
As one who's basically used a four color palette for a while, I return to WetCanvas to find a thread that really peaked my interest. I use Daniel Smith's watercolors, Cad. yellow light, Pthalo Blue (GS), Quinacridone Rose, and Qinacridone Sienna for most of my painting. Trips to turquoise water might bring out the Viridian. I love the fact that my paintings can hang together with such cohesion, and recently have appreciated that limited palette when working on some watercolor collages.

RebeccaJFleming
09-12-2012, 03:44 AM
As one who's basically used a four color palette for a while, I return to WetCanvas to find a thread that really peaked my interest. I use Daniel Smith's watercolors, Cad. yellow light, Pthalo Blue (GS), Quinacridone Rose, and Qinacridone Sienna for most of my painting. Trips to turquoise water might bring out the Viridian. I love the fact that my paintings can hang together with such cohesion, and recently have appreciated that limited palette when working on some watercolor collages.

I recently decided to try a limited palette of four colours (as well as wanting to try out honey-based paint) so I got the M Graham paints in Nickel Azo Yellow, Quinacridone Rose, Pthalocyanine Blue and Burnt Sienna. I haven't had time to do an actual painting with them yet, but through playing around and experimenting I've discovered I can mix pretty much anything with them (though I'll admit that getting the right grey can sometimes be trial and error).

That being said, I prefer to have a larger range of colours to choose from generally... When it comes to paints, I'm like a magpie, collecting as many colours as I can :)

Tred
09-12-2012, 03:59 AM
Re Edward Seago palette

Like many of his ilk he did not think in terms of colour - more in terms of warm, cool and value hence the scant information about his palette. Skipping through his book "A Canvas to Cover'" looking on each page for a reference to a particular pigment - I found nothing - but as a book on painting in general - it's a gem!
To whet your appitite here's a quick listing of the contents and a couple of quotes:-
The chapters are:-
Landscape with Figures
Of Colour in Nature
Of Light and Atmosphere
Of Trees and Hedgerows
Of the Sky
Of Water
Of the Wind
Of Distance
Of Snow
Of Sunshine and Shadow
Of Seasons of the Year
A Canvas to Cover

"Colours which are complimentary can be a pitfall for the painter. While a spot of red somewhere in the picture can make the greens "sing" an overdose can easily make them crude. I remember once painting a picture inside a circus tent. The curtains at the ring doors were a vivid orange, and the quarter poles of the tent were blue. I painted them so and found that the poles "shouted" and were far too bright I toned them down and they still "shouted. Again I reduced the tone, but with the same result. Finally I painted the poles grey , and they appeared to be the exact shade of blue I wanted. This, of course was due to the orange curtains - blue is the complementary colour to orange. When the eye is confronted with an overdose of orange it seeks blue to rest it; so that anything that is already blue will appear more so, and must be quietened down considerably if it is not to appear crude."

"I remember when I first started to sort out the tones of a cloud. My inclination, then, was to isolate each tone with a clearly defined edge, so the result looked rather like a stencil, and nothing could have appeared less airy. Again I looked at the clouds - the tones were certainly there, the lights and darks and all the tones in between. Why couldn't I paint them so - why didn't my clouds float - why did they always come out as dirty smudges on a blue background, which had none of the luminosity of the wondrous ocean overhead."
The next nine pages tell of his studies into cloud formations and how to portray them although I do believe he is seeing them through he eyes of an oil painter rather than a watercolourist.
I could go on because there is a mine of information contained in the 134 pages of this book - most painting related.

When you consider the exorbitant prices being charged for out of print Art books this one's a steal at sixteen pounds for a first edition; hard back obviously (Amazon UK).

I first became aware of Edward Seago as a child when reading "Rabbit Skin Cap" and "I Walk By Night" both tales of Norfolk poachers by Lilias Rider Haggard (daughter of Sir Henry Rider Haggard ("King Solomons Mines and She") and illustrated by Edward Seago. I don't recommend them as they were written in the Norfolk dialect and "Yew wunt understand a wud."
Cheers
Tred

alansam
09-13-2012, 09:16 AM
nice to read your reply Tred,,,, I am reading the book / it is a biography mostly about his family life and growing up.I find it a bit deep// there is not a lot about painting in it,

alansam
09-13-2012, 09:26 AM
Tred ,I like some of seagos sayings "I have known painters who have gone to far in trying technique
that they have finally lost the power of creating a picture""I will bear with these imperfections .the picture is saying something I might other wise loose altogether "

alansam
09-13-2012, 12:43 PM
the colours used by Edward Wesson.it is a mutted palette
winsor blue
ultramarine blue
cobalt blue
light red
winsor yellow
and burnt sienna//yet to me steve hall uses another red ,and I do think Ted would need to do the same to get the rich orange tones ,he got on some of his buildings.impossible with light red ,that is a dull red. I use winsor red in my palette .and I often use it in autum trees to give a bit more bite than light red , as you know winsor is on the cool side ,,dose any one else substute a red say,cad red ,that is a warmer tone ,in their palettes ,

Tred
09-13-2012, 08:08 PM
Alan,
Ted's other red was alizarin crimson and his palette in 1966 was :-

monstral blue (the Rowney thalo)
ultramarine
*cobalt blue
burnt umber
burnt sienna
*light red
raw sienna
chrome or lemon yellow
*black
*alizarin crimson
Some I have marked with an * as I feel these to be optional for anyone trying to make do with a limited palette. Cobalt blue and light red, both being somewhat opaque, are better used for mixing greys in a diluted form. Black I only use to temper other colours when I want a low tone and not too intense a colour .Alizarin crimson I carry, but rarely use unless for a pinkish flush in the sky. But of course I use it for flowers. So really your palette can boil down to two blues, two browns, and two yellows with some additions for special subjects.

The source of the above is The Artist Magazine, July 1966 issue which included the article by Ted Wesson entitled "The Ways of Watercolour part 2 Flowers in Watercolours" which was the second part of a three part series.

Incidently Steve Hall's reds are light red or venetian red and burnt sienna.

Cheers
Tred