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QTs
01-22-2012, 06:02 PM
Anyone have experience painting onto glass?

I'm trying to get a way to apply acrylics and gouache/watercolors in a fashion that will bond with the glass permanently, using a polymer that has no texture.

Was going to use GAC200 through an airbrush, but the site says that it can't achieve a permanent bond with glass.

If anyone has other suggestion for a surface that is also transparent and smooth, it would work also. Maybe acrylic sheet, has anyone tried? Suppose it would be far less scratch resistant though.. and a bit less clear.

idylbrush
01-23-2012, 06:45 AM
Painting on glass can be done and has been done. I have created acrylic skins on glass for many years. The question is how to keep it on the glass. Glass, not being porous, is a difficult surface. I would imagine that a sandblasted surface would be ideal or a surface with acid etching. Something to give the paint a bit of something to grab onto. When that is not possible a sandwich of glass might be a solution. Years ago there was an additive for paint that increased the adhesion but I haven't seen it on the market for a while. Check your local art supply.

Patrick Eubanks
01-23-2012, 08:38 AM
use oil based kilz as a primer on the areas you are going to paint. It can be refomed by heavy scraping but it will not just pop off.

QTs
01-23-2012, 12:49 PM
If the surface isn't disturbed (i.e. if framed behind glass or whatnot), will it still eventually detach from the glass? I haven't had anything remotely for long enough to know.

Regarding Kilz, how is the spray version? (Kilz Upshot)

Lady Carol
01-23-2012, 01:54 PM
I have painted on glass. You have to make sure that the paint is cured for a few days. Even though it may be dry, it can lift off easily when applying another coat. I noticed when the paint was a little aged it stuck better and additional coats could be applied. I still have paint on glass and it has been OK for the past 3 years. I do not see it lifting in any way.

Einion
01-23-2012, 03:00 PM
I'm trying to get a way to apply acrylics and gouache/watercolors in a fashion that will bond with the glass permanently, using a polymer that has no texture.
How 'permanently' were you thinking? It's generally considered the case that you can't get paints to stick with absolute reliability to glass because it's so smooth, down to a microscopic level.

The way to help improve the bond is to texture the surface, either by etching or sandblasting, but this might not suit what you're looking to do and it can be outside the scope of what's practical to do yourself (even for cost reasons alone). It's also not a guarantee that the paint will bond well in the very long term.

If anyone has other suggestion for a surface that is also transparent and smooth, it would work also. Maybe acrylic sheet, has anyone tried? Suppose it would be far less scratch resistant though.. and a bit less clear.
Clarity should be essentially the same but yes, far less resistant to scratching unless you can get one with a scratch-resistant coating on it (as applied to plastic lenses for spectacles)?

Paints can adhere to plastics a lot better than glass, but for regular artists' acrylics you'd really want to texture the surface to help get a good mechanical bond formed with the surface of the sheet.

If it's an option, multi-surface primers and other kinds of primer intended for hard materials (like auto primer) can bond really strongly even to the polished finish of something like Perspex, and acrylic paint can then bond to the primer quite well.

Einion

Rick G
01-23-2012, 03:18 PM
There are craft paints that are formulated specifically for painting on glass. This link has a pretty thorough discussion of the options if you're interested:

http://www.your-decorative-painting-resource.com/glass-paint.html

QTs
01-23-2012, 04:37 PM
How 'permanently' were you thinking? It's generally considered the case that you can't get paints to stick with absolute reliability to glass because it's so smooth, down to a microscopic level.

The way to help improve the bond is to texture the surface, either by etching or sandblasting, but this might not suit what you're looking to do and it can be outside the scope of what's practical to do yourself (even for cost reasons alone). It's also not a guarantee that the paint will bond well in the very long term.
10-15 years? Anything past that would seem difficult to predict at least.

Would like to do the sandblasting, but like you mentioned, it's difficult to do at home... I have to keep the cost reasonable since I sell most of my work on the street.

Trying to avoid getting new paints since I'd have to get too many to afford, but will look into that if there's no cheaper treatment options.

Interesting thing if the glass can be left transparent is that the depth of some shadow cast from the painted front image looks very interesting..

cadub
01-23-2012, 08:47 PM
I've used mod podge with a fair bit of luck - the surface to be painted is washed well, then wiped with alcohol. It dries fairly clear - you would have to do a test run as it is fairly thick and I think a bristle brush would work best. Not sure of the durability - that is another question.
Regards

halinabarbara
06-12-2012, 07:28 AM
Thank you.
It solved my problem.
And someone will get oryginal Christmas Gift from me.