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mollerman
01-16-2012, 05:47 PM
Any opinions as to who makes the best pastel pencil sharpener? I have tried many sharpeners and disgarded most. There is not much of anything more frustrating than sharpening these pastel pencils only to have the nib snap off repeatedly! I use Carbothello, Faber/Castell, Cretacolor and General pastel pencils.

I have heard that the sharpeners in the cosmetic department used for eye liners works well... I was not convinced. I have used carbathello's sharpener since it was the only one listed in one of my catalogs with fairly good success. The best one I have come up with so far and like the best is the sharpener that General makes. Only problem I see is I would need to buy a set whenever the blades go dull or is there a place to purchase just the sharpener? Any other thoughts or opinions?

Devonlass
01-16-2012, 06:34 PM
I alway recommend the Creative Mark multi point sharpener. If you put in "creative mark" in the Search this forum box, you will find others that agree with me. It's fabulous, sharpens to a great point with no breakages, and also sharpens nupastels when and if needed.

allydoodle
01-16-2012, 07:46 PM
I just purchased this (http://www.dickblick.com/products/mobius-and-ruppert-brass-pencil-sharpeners/)sharpener from Blick (the single hole grenade), I find it's great because you can buy replacement blades from Blick as well. I find it works very well on Carb Othello and Gioconda (the two brands that I have that are the same diameter as the ones you use). It doesn't fit the Conte or Derwent, as they are too large a pencil. I use this (http://www.aswexpress.com/discount-art-supplies/drawing-and-drafting-supplies/pencil-sharpeners/creative-mark-multi-point-pencil-sharpener.html)sharpener (Creative Mark) for the Conte and Derwent pencils, it's the only one that I've found that works for the larger diameter pencils.

Hope this helps!

water girl
01-17-2012, 12:20 AM
I use the battery operated sharpener from Staples...under $20. It doesn't accomdate Conte though.

rugman
01-17-2012, 12:38 AM
I dont use pencils often, but when I do, I get so frustrated when tip breaks off, so.......

Now I go out into garage and use my belt sander. I turn it upside down, or on its side and roll the pencil while its sanding. Makes the most perfect sharp point, no breakage

I have been keeping my eyes out for a small, crafty type sander that I could put in my studio area (instead of going out into garage). Im sure there is something like this out there somewhere. Or you could probably find a cheap sander at pawn shop or garage sale

Colorix
01-17-2012, 05:27 AM
A sturdy snap-off blade, which can be locked into position. (In other words, not the cheapest ones.) I think they are called utility knives, or Stanley knives. (Is the plural with a 'v'?)

You can make as sharp a point as you want. Or save 'lead' by only taking away wood but not the actual pastel core.

NC-artist
01-17-2012, 08:47 AM
Howdy fellow artists - been AWOL and kindof lurky for a bit but when I saw this thread title followed by Colorix' response, I couldn't help but decloak (hehe) to say that after having bought a ton of sharpeners, including a nice electric one, that ye olde utility knife has been an absolute Godsend.

Blades can be purchased and switched out as often as needed, no more broken tips, no more paperclips needed to get the broken tip out of the sharpener, no more frustration.

Love my utility knife!

Budan
01-17-2012, 10:40 AM
After taking a workshop with Dianna Ponting where she recommended this sharpener, I also use the Staples battery operated pencil sharpener. Works great. I use Cretacolor and Stabilo pencils. I have not tried to sharper Nupastels....but would probably use sandpaper to do so.

mollerman
01-17-2012, 01:04 PM
Lots of ideas and opinions! Ron - I like the idea of a belt sander, makes good sense! I forgot all about that from my carpenter days. I have tried the utility knife and still end up beaking tips and when I am looking for a sharp point used a sand block. Only problem for me is laziness. I like the idea of a few twists of the wrist and it is a done deal. Those electric sharpeners sound interesting. I have a battery operated Derwent that used to work great until I tried a pastel pencil, jammed and took it apart to fix, now it doesn't work for doodly scwat! Those different diameter pencils can be a problem. Thanx for all the input.

japonaise
01-17-2012, 04:36 PM
Grenade or "pineapple" sharpener is my favorite. But for pastel pencils, I still use a craft knife and sand block. Only a guess here - the pastel pencil cores are very brittle so that the slightest jarring may cause stress points in the core. And, we never know how the containers have been handled between mfg and retail.

SherryC
01-17-2012, 04:49 PM
I have the Multi point professional pencil sharpener and it works well, however, I only have Carbothello pencils. I rarely have one break. IT was recommended by someone on WC a few years ago as being the best, so I tried it.

robertsloan2
01-17-2012, 04:58 PM
Multi Point Professional sharpener available at ASW or Jerry's Artarama. It's a hand crank grinder type. Clean it every dozen pencils or so by sharpening a normal graphite pencil in it, the cheap No. 2 pencil.

That's been gentler on my Carb-Othello pastel pencils than anything and actually provides a long point on them. It's eerie how well it performs.

Any hand sharpener will be okay as long as the blade is brand new. If there's the slightest friction with a dull blade, the points break off. Pastel pencils and Prismacolor colored pencils are the most vulnerable. The biggest problem with good ones like the Prismacolor Colored Pencil Sharpener and my personal favorite, the cheap little General's All Art sharpener, is using it too long and expecting good results when the blade's gone dull.

The advantage of grinder type sharpeners is that they're self sharpening, but cleaning it by sharpening graphite eliminates buildup on the grinders. Electrics work fairly well but nowhere near as well as the Multi Point Professional.

I got it mostly because I got tired of using and needing electricity to sharpen delicate pencils. I was happily surprised when it came out that much better than my old electric one.

I never had the patience or hand strength to use knife and sandpaper block to sharpen pencils. I've done it a couple of times and it's difficult, it takes some hand strength to be able to shave off the wood and it also takes a lot of patience compared to anything else. It may be easier for people who don't share my disabilities, as I have some muscular weakness along with the chronic fatigue. The nice thing about the Multi-Point is that mechanical leverage makes it very easy to use. If you have arthritis in your hands it's still usable, you don't need to press the pencil into the opening or use effort to turn the crank.

Warlok
01-18-2012, 02:54 AM
I've got two - a desk mounted spiral bit Rodahle 133 sharpener that works wonders on all my pencils. IT has an adjustment to either get a razor sharp point or a nice dull rounded tip, and everything in between, plus a stop that keeps me from wasting a lot of pencils. Pricey (~$20), but worth it IMHO.

I also use a hand-held sharpener whose name escapes me. It has two holes - the first trims the wood, and the second sharpens the lead. Works great on the FC pastel pencils, but always breaks the tips off the General's pencils - I blame the pencils myself... :-)

--Jon

Sonni
01-18-2012, 10:55 PM
Now I go out into garage and use my belt sander. I turn it upside down, or on its side and roll the pencil while its sanding. Makes the most perfect sharp point, no breakage

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: way to go.

KariTirrell
01-19-2012, 10:23 PM
I have a couple of reviews (http://karitirrell.blogspot.com/search?q=sharpener) of pencil sharpeners on my blog.

I bought one of the Staples battery operated sharpeners, but haven't reviewed it yet. It works pretty well (so far) for the thinner pencils. As previously noted, Contes won't fit. It's great for when the pencil gets short. Mine tends to eat more of the pencil than my other sharpeners, and unfortunately clogs just as often.

I also have the same little hand held one Chris mentioned, plus the Carbothello sharpener, plus I've tried using a sharpener for eye liner pencils, as someone else mentioned. I hate those little ones and only use them when the pencil gets really small and it's either that or a blade. But that's just personal preference.:)

chuas2
01-21-2012, 04:08 PM
X-acto knife and a chisel type blade and sandpaper. labor intensive, but unless the pencil is dropped and the whole core is shattered, very little breakage.

Ambergris
09-21-2015, 11:36 PM
wrong place

tulabula
09-24-2015, 12:34 AM
I just started using the brass sharpener they sell at Dakota pastels. They have a large and small hole for different sizes and also has replaceable blades.
It has performed very well as long as I don't overuse a blade

robertsloan2
09-24-2015, 09:57 PM
That one sounds nice, Laurie. I used to have a brass one like that, I loved it. Lost it in a move, or maybe it's just buried in one of the boxes of little stuff either here or back in Arkansas. Glad they have it. Finding replacement blades was hard for so many years.

Mythros
03-13-2016, 03:58 PM
I found a video from Derwent on Amazon for a tool to help sharpen pastel and charcoal pencils. They have a reputation for being difficult to sharpen Derwent recommends an exacto knife with the pencils pencil set safely in a pencil stand.
Mythros
I bet there is also one on You Tube and at the Derwent product home page. Doesn't look as nice as wax pencil in a pencil sharpener.

mudfish
03-16-2016, 08:49 PM
Mobius and Ruppert brass double hole sharpener from Amazon. $8, sharpens large and small. Best I've ever owned. Have had it over a year now, still sharp but would be worth the price even if you had to replace it every year. The points broke the first time because the sharpener changed the angle but after that perfection.

tuzigoot
03-16-2016, 08:53 PM
Karen Marguillis recommends on her blog using a make-up sharpener. Seems a bit more practical than a belt sander.....

*Deirdre*
03-16-2016, 09:19 PM
I have a couple of reviews (http://karitirrell.blogspot.com/search?q=sharpener) of pencil sharpeners on my blog.

I bought one of the Staples battery operated sharpeners, but haven't reviewed it yet. It works pretty well (so far) for the thinner pencils. As previously noted, Contes won't fit. It's great for when the pencil gets short. Mine tends to eat more of the pencil than my other sharpeners, and unfortunately clogs just as often.

I also have the same little hand held one Chris mentioned, plus the Carbothello sharpener, plus I've tried using a sharpener for eye liner pencils, as someone else mentioned. I hate those little ones and only use them when the pencil gets really small and it's either that or a blade. But that's just personal preference.:)
I like the Staples ones too! Tip for the eyebrow pencil...pop it in the icebox for a few minutes before you sharpen it to get a nice point!

PeggyB
03-20-2016, 09:21 PM
I've tried many, and am now satisfied with the same one Laurie (tulabula) suggested. The replacement blades are easily gotten from Dakota. I also like the two sizes of holes, solid brass weight, and small size; it fits easily into my art "accessories" bag.

Grinner
04-03-2016, 11:55 PM
I've given up on sharpeners (too much breakage) and use a craft knife now - here's a page where I found really good instructions (http://www.penciltopics.co.uk/page184.html) and here is an older thread where I posted a photo of my results (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1317328).

pasteltekenaar
04-04-2016, 03:25 AM
I also use a small nail file wich is handy in my pencilbox and also easy to clean.:smug: