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ribeyedsmile
01-10-2012, 07:48 PM
Marbling is typicaly done as Lady Carol described in the information kiosk.
This results in esentialy a monoprint on paper.

What if you wanted to incorporate marbling into a painting but don't want to cut paper to acomplish.

Marbling can be done directly to the canvas or to create a paint skin.

I personaly like to use:

liquitex pouring medium
Liquitex Acrylic Inks
Golden Flow Release

I like working on glass but i also marble directly on the canvas.

sometimes i adjust the medium with water by 25% or less to make it more fluid. This will allow the inks to spread more rapidly across the surface of the puddle.

Basicaly, read lady carols wonderful explanation of marbling. Then substitute the vat of fluid with a much shallower pool of medium.

the medium can be poured directly on the canvas or it can be done on a glass sheet.

take you inks and drop a few drops of color in small cups (ie paper or plastic). Then add 1 drop of flow release to each color cup. now

pour the medium and with a brush or coarse comb you comb thru the medium to distribute it evenly. I like to have a depth of at least a millimeter or 1/16th of an inch. Maybe an 1/8th inch.

now with a small brush splatter the colors onto medium. you can be random or drip into specific places.

AND THEN
Comb thru to create the patterns.

if done on glass....give 4 to 12 hours to dry..

peel away as described in tutorials on making acrylic skins.

This skin can now be used as a collage element for painting.

michael





ps:
http://ribeyedsmile.deviantart.com/gallery/#/d349leg
http://ribeyedsmile.deviantart.com/gallery/#/d34ezqu
http://ribeyedsmile.deviantart.com/gallery/?offset=24#/d2w88rz

PattiLou
01-10-2012, 11:27 PM
Those are cool!!! :thumbsup: I need to play around and experiment more.

chammi kaiser
01-11-2012, 04:45 AM
Agree with Patti, they certainly are cool!!! Wish I had more time to play around - would love to give this a go.

ribeyedsmile
01-11-2012, 10:50 PM
i need more time and money for these too..


ty for looking

OkeeKat
01-11-2012, 11:39 PM
Great work Michael!
Love the first!!

Charlie's Mum
01-12-2012, 09:02 AM
It's good to be encouraged to experiment - haven't been doing enough of that lately, so I'll give this (or a variation) a try ......... thanks Michael:)

Sixoclock
01-12-2012, 09:40 AM
Not to sound dumb (which I probably will) -- but I would assume you would leave the "skin" on the canvas if you chose to directly work on the canvas, correct? Again, I don't mean to sound like an idiot, I have just never read much about this mehtod before.

ribeyedsmile
01-12-2012, 04:28 PM
but I would assume you would leave the "skin" on the canvas if you chose to directly work on the canvas, correct? Again, I don't mean to .......I have just never read much about this mehtod before.

I think this is a fine question..
most marbling is to create a print. I am saying not to remove it. Let it dry on the canvas if done directly on the canvas.


But... maybe you want to choose the best patern. Then do it on glass and peel it off when dry. this is an acrylic skin. You can cut n paste it just about anywhere.

see lady carols marble post in Information Kiosk

see these additional links conscerning original marble and the new idea of making skins:

marble
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/62215/588/

Skins
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2330/463/page6.php

Sixoclock
01-12-2012, 06:55 PM
You are simply marvelous. Thank you for the information!! <3 Plus you're from Jersey, my home state. :D

suzlebeau
01-12-2012, 08:48 PM
Michael, I also work with skins most of the time. You had a couple of questions on the Deviantart page. You can check with freecycle and ask for old dressertop mirrors. They have a wooden frame and can be stacked while you are working on something else. I would unstack to dry, since it takes a long time if you leave them stacked. This gives really BIG areas to work on. I use old hair coloring bottles (You can use the generic ketchup/mustard ones instead, but hey-I'm cheap!) and thin my heavier paints with a water/medium mix. Shake it really well but wait a day or so for it to settle so the bubbles go away. It also has a nice tip for thinner lines.

ribeyedsmile
01-13-2012, 04:58 PM
hey thanks for lookin guys

hi suzlebeau and welcome....thanx for the ideas. Right now i dont have much space to spread out in. I did get a small stack of about 8 mirror tiles(8" x 8"). Not nearly large enough but atleast I can make a couple of skins.

Still..... one day I will have exactly what I think I want (yeah, riiggghhht. In my dreams)

ribeyedsmile
01-13-2012, 04:59 PM
non stick cookie sheets are good too

sonita
01-13-2012, 05:36 PM
Great post....working with abstract and marbling myself for quite some time and enjoy it very much. You can see the results, when you go to my flickr link and look at the abstract series :-)

collager
02-20-2012, 04:32 PM
I used liquitex pouring medium to a depth of about 1/2 inch inside a homemade balsam wood frame. It dried clear over many layers but then about a week later starting turning cloudy around the edges, worse when heated.

Does anyone have experience with this?


Thanks

zenjenn
02-20-2012, 08:26 PM
Wow! I love the effect.. it never occurred to me this could be done with acrylic directly on canvas. I'll be trying it for sure at some point!

romi
02-20-2012, 09:06 PM
abstract & marbling just wonderful....

badabara
05-04-2012, 03:44 AM
What exactly does the Flow Release do? Is it a necessary ingredient?

ribeyedsmile
05-04-2012, 04:23 PM
What exactly does the Flow Release do? Is it a necessary ingredient?

it is necessary if you want to pigment to spread wide across a surface.

You can get marbling to have various looks and qualities. Flow Release adds to the effects in a dynamic way.

It is also added to your water to increase the spread when looking for watercolor effects. I believe it may act like soap or glycerine but i am not a chemist.

Flow aid is an acceptible additive produced by different brands so its relatively safe to add to acrylics.