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View Full Version : Preference for tit. white


Patrick Eubanks
11-28-2011, 08:27 PM
what is everyone's preference for titan. white? I am a mixed media artist and have been using chroma brand white for years but some recent mix changes are leaving me suaturbed to say the least. I paint in really thin layers and am used to the layering process taking a while. The problem Im having is the white is losing its intensity over a short time.
Its like the white evaporates over time.
Help?

Alessandra Kelley
11-28-2011, 09:42 PM
I looked all over and could not find Chroma's pigment Colour Index Number, which would tell you exactly which pigments they use. By law, it should be on the packaging somewhere. If you find a "PW6" on the packaging, it means the pigment they are using is titanium white.

On the other hand, I don't know exactly what paints you're using. The Chroma acrylic paints I found on Dick Blick's website are student-grade acrylics, and the only white listed is a titanium white.

If those are the paints you are using, the problem is probably that they are student grade. Student grade acrylics are cheap and skimp on pigments (and are thus semi-transparent compared to artist-grade acrylics). I wouldn't recommend them for anybody, as they are difficult to use and don't much help you to learn how to paint with good acrylics.

I don't know of any acrylic paint that uses any white pigment but titanium white, except that Golden makes a specialty zinc white acrylic. It is extremely transparent, and uncommon.

So you are probably painting with titanium white already.

Also you are probably aware that acrylics dry darker and more transparent than they look, especially if you are painting thinly. If Chroma recently changed its formula to skimp even more on the pigment, it's no wonder you're having trouble.

If this is your situation (and I may be misreading it), I'd recommend investing in a really good brand of paint, like Golden or Liquitex artists' grade, not student grade, titanium white. The good stuff doesn't cost that much more than the student grade, and the handling difference is tremendous.

Patrick Eubanks
11-28-2011, 11:29 PM
This a special paint developed with a dead flat finish. I carve decorative duck decoys and have had no problems in the past. Im feeling like they may be skimping. Ive used liquitex and Goldens in the past and really didnt like the "shine" given off of the final product. Im a big fan of liquitex if I could get the shine off. I guess ill try adding matte varnish to the mix and see how that works.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Nov-2011/979027-EubanksPinstripe005e.jpg

Patrick Eubanks
11-28-2011, 11:30 PM
Pic is a little washed out from the photo but you get the idea about the white. This was taken two months ago and since then it has yellowed and all detail was lost on the white.

Stacey3352
11-29-2011, 12:33 AM
Are you priming the wood with GAC-100 before you paint and coating with a layer of white gesso. The GAC-100 should help with the yellowing and the gesso should brighten your white. Try it out on a scrap piece of wood first and if you use a paint with a gloss finish you can apply a layer of matte medium over the paint to matte the gloss finish.

noodle1
11-29-2011, 02:30 PM
I do think Stacey has given you a good answer, priming the wood keeps your paint from sinking in so much and you from having to add too many layers of paint especially with wood. I use to do a lot of painting on wood at one time. Only suggestion I have is of late I've been using Old Holland's Extra Opaque Titanium White, and I have found a difference while layering. Soft finish when dry but not the cheapest brand on the market.
And Varnishing will bring back all your colors and there are good matte ones to use.

And I have to add that duck is just gorgeous!!

Alessandra Kelley
11-29-2011, 02:45 PM
That duck is lovely, and I can understand your frustration if you're losing detail in the whites.

Golden makes a Heavy Body Matte Acrylic with a lot of pigment and a matte finish. Their prices are reasonable and their quality is very high. I haven't tried Old Holland's acrylics, but I know they make excellent oil paints.

Einion
11-29-2011, 03:52 PM
Awsome decoy Patrick! Generally speaking if I'm painting using any given brand I use the TW from that brand, although these days I'll often mix and match paints because I have a lot of different ones to pick from.

My favourite brands for fine-art painting wouldn't be suitable for you because they dry with some degree of shine but when I do want to work with a paint that dries naturally to a matt finish I use the Jo Sonjas.

The Golden matt acrylics mentioned above, I was also going to suggest those as an option although I haven't tried them myself; two other possibilities that come to mind as the Turner Acryl Gouache and Chroma Absolute Matte.

I looked all over and could not find Chroma's pigment Colour Index Number, which would tell you exactly which pigments they use. By law, it should be on the packaging somewhere.
Actually there is no regulation that stipulates pigments must be listed by paintmakers; only if they want to conform to an ASTM standard (and subsequently list the relevant number on the labelling or in their literature) is this required.

Einion

Patrick Eubanks
11-29-2011, 07:30 PM
Thanks guys and ladies

Alessandra Kelley
12-02-2011, 03:42 PM
Actually there is no regulation that stipulates pigments must be listed by paintmakers; only if they want to conform to an ASTM standard (and subsequently list the relevant number on the labelling or in their literature) is this required.

Einion

Thanks for the clarification. I was wrong, and it's good to know.

AndyfromVienna
12-03-2011, 04:42 PM
wonderful work!!!

:)

Andy