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modart
10-28-2011, 07:37 PM
Hi,

I'm new to Wet Canvas and love reading the forums and all the help you give each other and now I am needing your help. Not sure where I should put this post, so you may come across it in another area.

I mostly paint abstract paintings, using Golden fluid acrylics and recently saw a chemical reaction an artist was getting when he dropped paint onto a medium. I think the medium might be gesso, but it must have had something mixed with it , followed by watercolour of some sorts and then an expander which I think may be methylated spirits. But when I tried all this the gesso didn't work. I had thinned it down with water which could be part of the problem. So if you would like to take a look at artkitstore on youtube to see what i am trying to achieve and then get back to me, I would really appreciate it.

Thanks, Modart

idylbrush
10-29-2011, 12:34 AM
If you look here (http://artkitstore.com/) you may buy their "kit". Having not seen this before I am not sure if it is an acrylic technique or not. It certainly is interesting.

modart
10-29-2011, 04:15 AM
Thanks for your reply but buying the kit would be too expensive because I want to do large canvasses with a range of colours. I'll keep trying to work it out.

Modart

autolisp
10-30-2011, 06:40 AM
That is a very interesting video on YouTube.

Lady Carol
10-30-2011, 07:50 PM
It looks pretty simple to me. I suspect that it is thinned gesso with drops of colour that is allowed to diffuse and then ethanol dropped on to the colour to break the surface tension. You may have to play around with how much you dilute the colours and the gesso.

autolisp
10-31-2011, 07:53 PM
I would be inclined to think along the 'acrylic medium' route for the base coating. I noticed on the 'YouTube' demonstration a reply to a question about the base coat stated it was made by them using 'Titanium' White'. So presumably it started out as a clear coat, as the acrylic mediums do. Here is another 'YouTube' link to a similar method. The author states he uses White Gesso it is thinned almost to water consistency and water based paints.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wa_DP8xLQt0&feature=related

Interesting.

autolisp

autolisp
11-01-2011, 11:05 AM
What I find interesting is the way the colour paints spread in a 'crystallizing' form. When I try this they just spread out in a circle. Anyone know of a paint brand that behaves in this way?
autolisp

Andrew
11-01-2011, 11:28 AM
It is a balancing act between the viscosity of the paint, and the volume and speed in which the organic (Ethanol in this case) is delivered. If the paint is too thin and the organic is delivered to judiciously, it will pool.

The interesting patterns are formed as the organic seeks out the path of least resistance as it flows outward.

Andrew

Stacey3352
11-01-2011, 07:17 PM
Andrew, have you tried this?

autolisp
11-02-2011, 06:41 AM
This could turn into one of those 'I wonder what the original formula for Liquid Clear is?' threads.
autolisp

Andrew
11-02-2011, 10:47 AM
Andrew, have you tried this?

In a way. Within my context of my day job, as an industrial analytical chemist, I have dealt with the dispersing of organic solutions into aqueous solutions and vice versa.

It also should be noted, that we are not really discussing a chemical reactions. What is really being involved is differences in solubility and miscibilty.

Andrew

autolisp
11-02-2011, 01:22 PM
Andrew The interesting patterns are formed as the organic seeks out the path of least resistance as it flows outward.
Is there a way in which the path/s could be controlled, e.g. by the introduction of another element (figuratively speaking).
autolisp

Andrew
11-03-2011, 10:52 AM
Andrew
Is there a way in which the path/s could be controlled, e.g. by the introduction of another element (figuratively speaking).
autolisp

There is always going to be some "randomness", but if you were to lay down varying viscosities of paint, or play with the concentration of the organic, I suppose you could excert a small level of control.

Andrew

autolisp
11-09-2011, 12:32 PM
Has anyone tried this idea yet? Did you have any success? If so. How did you do it?
autolisp

modart
11-13-2011, 04:27 AM
Sorry autolisp, I have had no luck. I keep checking this forum each day to see if someone can come up with a simple product that gives this terrific reaction.
Modart