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huckaday
03-17-2003, 12:44 AM
Hi guys! :D I was just wondering if any of you may know where I can get some info on airbrushing? A friend of mine wants me to do his tank on his motorbike and is going to lend me a complete airbrush set to practice with, and I have NEVER used one before!!! I also am a bit afraid of painting on an object that isn't flat!!!! :eek:

So I am looking for a good site with some info on the subject. I am currently "googling" all over but although I am finding some great examples of wonderful art, I am not finding very much on the process that goes into airbrushing. (masking etc)

Thank you very much in advance,
Alana

myorca
03-17-2003, 07:07 AM
HI Alana,

You may want to look in a Barnes & Noble type bookstore for airbrush how-to books.

Starting out of the gate on a gas tank without ever having picked up an airbrush is going to be a HUGE challenge, and I wish you luck with it!!

Bob

huckaday
03-17-2003, 11:49 AM
Oh I know!!! TG he is giving it to me to play with for a while. I did go to amazon and order a book last night so hopefully that will help some!

I did use one before, but that was in high school over a decade ago!!(reveals a bit about my age!lol)

myorca
03-17-2003, 12:28 PM
LOL dont feel too bad, im over the 2 decade mark....did i just say that????????? LOL

I airbrushed for a few years back in the late 70's early 80's and had a blast with it. One day I will get another brush and go crazy again. It definitely takes dedication and a ton of practice. I am glad to hear that you have at least used one before albeit awhile back.

Will you be showing us how it goes as you go through the process?? I hope so!

Bob

Howard Metzenberg
03-17-2003, 05:50 PM
Here are a couple of books and videos we offer:

Big Book Of Airbrush
http://www.dickblick.com/zz709/03/

Getting Started in Airbrush
http://www.dickblick.com/zz709/04/

Badger Instructional Airbrush Techniques Video Series
http://www.dickblick.com/zz720/41b/

Howard Metzenberg
Dick Blick Art Materials

huckaday
03-17-2003, 08:11 PM
Thanks Howard! I will keep those in mind... unfortunately I have already ordered "The Ultimate Airbrush Handbook" by Pamela Shanteau, Donn Shanteau; @ CDN$ 27.97 each from Amazon.ca. Does anyone know if that one is good?

jonquil
03-20-2003, 11:44 AM
I'm not a big fan of airbrush, but I do have some info about them.

1. When you begin a piece of airbrush work, make sure you have composition and layers mapped out beforehand. Do thumbnails with desired colors ahead of time, or you might have to redo the work. This is especially true if you are using masking, and not going freehand.

2. The brush (and paint) you use is important. You said you were going to do a motorcycle tank. What kind of airbrush are you using? Also, for metal, you have do to a lot of surface preparation, to make sure it sticks. And use a paint specifically designed for metal, like AutoAir. Plus, use a clear coat to seal.

3. Do not be afraid of painting on curved surfaces. Unless you spray too much and the paint starts to pool and drip, it is very easy to paint on non-flat surfaces.

If you are looking for supplies, I recommend Bear Air. They know airbrushes, and will be willing to chat with you (more than DickBlick anyway). Ask for SueBear, and tell her Cherie sent you.

Hope that helps.

jonquil
03-20-2003, 11:47 AM
sorry... if you are interested in bearair, it's www.bearair.com or call 1-800-232-7247. (I hope it's ok to refer you, this isnt an ad or anything, I used to work there...they are wonderful people and know airbrushes well)

:)

huckaday
03-21-2003, 02:29 AM
Jonquil, thank you very much for the info!!! The airbrush set that I got came with a Paasche type AEC, a Olympos hp-102c, Thayer & Chandler, Inc - one is 4513b the other 16100a. The friend who borrowed the set/compressor from another friend for me, said that one of them is for sand. *sigh* I also got a stack of books, but no manual for the airbrushes, just text books about airbrushing.... I am trying to figure out which one is a double action etc. I am scared to even start! (beginning to feel like I have been thrown to the wolves a bit here). He also lent me his tank to practice on. He hasn't given it the new paint job yet and said that it is easy to rub off..... I don't even know what paint to get! *sheesh* I think I am going to have to look around for someone who has used one to give me a quick lesson. I am not very good from learning from books, especially when the books don't match the item exactly. Because this isn't my equipment, I am so afraid to break it!

Mikey B.
03-23-2003, 09:24 PM
Hi Ya Fellow Airhead ,As a matter of fact just put my Airbrushes Away for the evening. I would suggest you Check out Airhead.com, a ton of info and he like myself is willing to help.I'm in the process of Airbrushing computer cases as well as a racing helmet which is indeed quite round!!The most important element of airbrushing anything is prepping and practice.If you would contact me .We can go in to depth about your project and I'll help as much as i can.You can check out my first computer case on the Misc. forum ..God Bless .....Mikey B.:cat:

jonquil
03-23-2003, 10:27 PM
Don't be afraid...you will get used to the airbrush quickly. spend some time practicing (just on paper...even cut up paper bags from grocery to spray all over for a while)

Airbrush Action magazine offers videos that might be easier to learn from than books go to https://www.airbrushaction.com/index2.html
- there is even one specifically for doing motorcycle tanks

As for the airbrushes...try them all.

also, it is pretty hard to really do damage to them...if anything you'll do damage to your self by getting paint sprayed all about. :) if you want to clean the airbrush, use one of the bottles that came with it filled with rubbing alcohol...just spray that through.

as far as paint, there isnt much available for airbrush that really clings to metal :( i do suggest Createx Auto Air. mikey is right...prep is pretty important. plan your design before you start to spray the tank.

i'll try to give you some more info later. (my pc just froze on me)

fermin
03-24-2003, 08:45 PM
good an airbrush enthusicatic :clap: ARTtalk.com they have newsletter too about airbrushing and other techniques

as jonquil said try ur airbrushes like vienna crystal wine cups
;)

and to mask u can use whatever u want as a no fixed mask (leaves, keys ur fingers) airbrush is a great and noble media when u learn how to ask it wht u want ;)

i found this about ur book
http://www.pamelashanteau.com/Independent_Reviews_of_the_Ultim.htm
unfortunately for me i couldn't find her address (not e-mail hehehe) :angel:

myorca
03-24-2003, 10:46 PM
Hi Huckaday,

Double-action brushes trigger works as follows. When the button is pushed down you get air. When you pull the button back while pushing down you get paint. The trick is to adjust the air/paint ratios for the effects you desire.

Good luck!! Looks like you got some great folks willing to help ya along!!


Bob

madster
03-25-2003, 11:30 AM
There are TONS of airbrush tutorials out there. Everything from the basics on how to use an airbrush, to fine pointers for skin, sky, you name it.

If you are just doing a search with the keyword "airbrush", you won't find the teaching sites.

Always search with the word TUTORIAL if you want to learn how to use something.

huckaday
03-25-2003, 09:38 PM
Wow! you guys are so very helpful!! I am getting less afraid now.... I think it was just the fear of wreaking some elses tools! And we certainly do not have the money to fix it if I do! I am just gonna go for it.... after I do more reading that is! ;)

TarheelTerrier
11-23-2003, 07:38 PM
Air brush is just so "magical" I've always felt. My first work with an airbrush was done with a tiny diaphragm compresser and an equally tiny Binks Wren single action. I'll date myself here (if I haven't already!) but my brother loved the group "Chicago" and as most remember one of their LP jackets (yeah...what's an LP?) featured the logo in stainless steel effect. Well, I cut a couple of stencils, loaded some black in the color jar and grabbed one of his white tees. After a few practice shots to gauge flow, but without even so much as a test run, I reproduced a pretty good facimile of the stainless steel logo. I was HOOKED!

I always felt the need to have "all" the info before starting out with a new technique or tool and this is very stifling. When I started out teaching myself computer graphics, I felt the same. But my brother who introed me to my first CG program explained sometimes you just don't need all that info to make a good start.
Same for airbrush. You can start very modestly and develop at your own pace. You have an EXCELLENT resource many here didn't have when first starting out, all the wealth of knowledge on the Internet! There are some fantastic people all over the WC! site who are so generous to share their experiences and knowledge. So grab a simple gun and go to it!

Alan Cross
11-24-2003, 01:11 AM
Lucky girl....I have only gotten to play with them a few times and they are fun....
Alan :)

Penny220
11-24-2003, 07:27 AM
I'm glad someone picked this post out of the stack and put it to the top. It's outdated but the information isn't and neither is what I am about to say.

Unless you are proficient with an airbrush DO NOT attempt to airbrush automotive. This is THE second hardest surface to master, the first is glass and THE least forgiving surface there is, you can not erase your mistakes. An experienced auto muralist knows the most complex methods of airbrushing. This is NOT for beginners.

There are non-toxic airbrush paints for automotive made by Createx called Auto-Air. Do not use them!!!! This is not an automotive paint. For automotive you use automotive paint [period]

If you are proficient with an airbrush and you wish to paint automotive tigerquill and myself both do and we will both be willing to help you in anyway.

Penny

TarheelTerrier
11-24-2003, 11:23 AM
But if you do wish to airbrush auto there are ways you can certainly practice. Buying a junked car hood you can primer and paint over and over, or even a sheet of aluminum.
Making friends with a body shop paint booth gun man is really useful. But anyone can practice on metal prepping and priming yourself using scrap parts/metal sheet. By learning to paint on your prepared surfaces you really appreciate working on fine professional ones later on. Old motorcycle tanks and crash helmets are really good teaching tools for learning to do 3-D surfaces.

Many might agree an important aspect of doing auto/metal as Penny suggested in her post is the medium matched to the substrate. There are new formulations of auto air brush paint being developed regularly, some draw high praise then lose popularity, others never make it. The "holy grail" of auto paints may not be easy to quantify, but each artist will have their favorites. Additionally, the "cleanliness is next to Godliness" motto goes double for auto painting. Spray boothes with heat lamps are useful for some paint applications, especially the final clear coat. Ventilation is an issue too, and a spray booth provides ventilation without the dust which can ruin a job. In fact, regardless of the medium you're spraying, a mask ventilator is imperative if you are air brushing. I have sprayed ceramic glazes through airbrush (and ceramic glazes ARE glass) but am just as careful to use a mask with watercolor. Huffing up pigment particles is NOT what your lungs want. :cat:

Penny220
11-24-2003, 02:57 PM
Great post TarheelTerrier,

I also tell people to make friends with their local autobody shop. Unless you are a painter you will need these people in the end to do your clearcoat work anyway. Cars get wrecked every day and an autobody shop just scraps these pieces. Ask them to hold a door, hood, tailgate, fender, whatever for you and they will be happy to just give it to you. Depending on how they buy their paints, they probably have a cabenet filled with half cans of pre-thinned and non-thinned paint. Ask them nice and they will usually give you what you want of it. I got my first set of autopaints this way, FREE! This is the place to go for any and all advice on proper surface prep, and they can order supplies for you at their discount! Be sure to align yourself with a good reputable shop, the underpaint and clearcoat job makes or breaks your art.

Penny

Alan Cross
11-24-2003, 03:01 PM
Originally posted by Penny220
Great post TarheelTerrier,

I also tell people to make friends with their local autobody shop. Unless you are a painter you will need these people in the end to do your clearcoat work anyway. Cars get wrecked every day and an autobody shop just scraps these pieces. Ask them to hold a door, hood, tailgate, fender, whatever for you and they will be happy to just give it to you. Depending on how they buy their paints, they probably have a cabenet filled with half cans of pre-thinned and non-thinned paint. Ask them nice and they will usually give you what you want of it. I got my first set of autopaints this way, FREE! This is the place to go for any and all advice on proper surface prep, and they can order supplies for you at their discount! Be sure to align yourself with a good reputable shop, the underpaint and clearcoat job makes or breaks your art.

Penny

Great tips Penny....
Alan :)