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Flycatcher10
10-23-2011, 02:08 PM
I would like to begin framing some of my work, but I have several questions and have not found where my questions might be answered w/n the oil pastel section.

Painting with oil pastels on Watercolor paper or pastel paper:

I painted directly on the paper and now I'm wondering how I can frame them. Was I suppose to mount the paper onto a mounting board before I painted so that it was already fixed to a hard surface?

Since oil pastels don't dry 100% I can't figure out if I mount the paintings onto a board afterwards - how I would do that without ruining the painting (for example, if the painted surface has to be stuck onto a prepared mountboard without smearing the painting, how would you smooth it out?).

I'm now quite frustrated because I'm at a stage w/re to framing and can't seem to find any answers to help me move forward. Thanks for helping me. Mary

Mo.
10-26-2011, 12:13 PM
Mary I've not framed any of my paintings myself, but have watched my framer at work, what he does is tape painting to the top of the backing board, then puts a mount around the painting, some spacers so that the pastel work doesn't touch the surface of the glass, then the glass and frame which is secured at the back with some sort of strong brown tape and finally the hooks and cord. Hope this helps.

Forgot to say that the backing board is bigger in size than the painting, it would be the same size as whatever mount is applied.

Flycatcher10
10-27-2011, 11:18 AM
Thank you Mo for replying. I think I understand what you've written - I'll probably work on this next week.

I have learned that there is a layering technique of sorts: art, mounting board, backing board, spacers and framing, and then taping.

Now to put all this together and not mess up a finished painting. Thanks so much. Mary

Mo.
10-27-2011, 01:54 PM
You've got it in one Mary, I forgot about the mounting board. :) Good luck!

halthepainter
10-29-2011, 04:21 PM
Hi Mary you can always "T" tape your paper to foam core or illustration/matboard. Trying to glue your work to foam core will likely result in some smearing (that can be corrected) even if you put glassine over the painted surface while the weighted, glued pieces set up.

If you are not familiar with "T" taping, merely make a "T" with two pieces of tape facing one another. The top of the "T" will go on the back of your painting right at the top and the reversed length of the stem of the "T" will be taped over the backing board. I "T" tape, two on the top and two on the bottom of the painting. This creates a very secure, firm, stable joining of the painting and backing that frames very well.

I also use this method of securing my matted prints to their backing before slipping them in their shrink wrap envelopes.

If framing full frame rather that matting my work, I used the plastic econo strips that stick to the glass and separate the work from the glass.

Flycatcher10
11-02-2011, 08:20 AM
Hi Hal - thanks your process was very interesting. At first I didn't get it, but coming back to read it - doesn't seem too difficult. What type of take do you normally use?

Do you still use mountboard and backboard when "T" taping your work?

Thanks this information was helpful. Mary

halthepainter
11-02-2011, 05:03 PM
Hi Hal - thanks your process was very interesting. At first I didn't get it, but coming back to read it - doesn't seem too difficult. What type of take do you normally use?

Do you still use mountboard and backboard when "T" taping your work?

Thanks this information was helpful. Mary

I use artist tape for the "T" taping.

If I'm painting on paper and not matting, I "T" tape to the backing. Then I just put the canvas panel or "T" taped painting in my frame, with spacers and just set a backing (usually foam core) board in the frame, lock it down with framers points, then seal the backing board and frame with a metalic framers tape.

Flycatcher10
11-04-2011, 07:36 PM
Hi Hal: This was really helpful information and also easy to understand. Will be trying your technique when I go to frame a couple of my paintings.

This question had a lot of views, because it's often jumbled in threads under framing w/o a clear explanation. So thanks, it cleared a lot up.

Thanks - Mary

halthepainter
11-04-2011, 08:07 PM
You're welcome. I hope it works well for you. I think this is better than double stick tape or glue. The backing board hides the stem side of the "T" tape and presents a nice finished look when sealed with framers tape.