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budhabee
10-12-2011, 02:44 PM
I paint in a shed out back. Its getting really cold here. I can buy a space heater or switch to acrylic. If I switch to acrylic could I blend it with a white mixing oil? I dont even know why i typed this. I could easily go find out myself by doing just that. I'm thinking of long term for the oil to dry. I dont know if that is going to be a mess. OR...I could sneak all my oils inside against mom's wishes...lol. And blending. Its my main grievance against acrylic. Soooo.....If I paint in my room using acrylic's and mix the blending white with terpentine and linseed oil the smell would be the same.
I think I just dont know what to do. I really dont care for acrylic. Can somebody change my mind?:wave:

Einion
10-12-2011, 04:27 PM
No, you can't really mix acrylic paint and oil paint... or at least you can, but it would make a bit of a mess!

And blending. Its my main grievance against acrylic.
If you feel you need to do extensive wet-blending to achieve the results you're looking for then standard acrylics really aren't the right medium. There are two acrylics made to have greatly extended working times - Golden Opens and Atelier Interactives - but neither of them will behave quite like you're used to from oil paint.

I should mention it is possible to paint indoors using oils without any recourse to spirits, although you do need to work in certain ways if you use just paint + oil.

If you did need to use even just a little spirits to get the desired working consistency at times there are low-odour solvents made that are significantly less smelly than real turps* and are much safer to use in an enclosed space as well.

*The best of them have no smell you'd easily notice at about arm's length, although people's sensitivity to this sort of thing does vary.

Einion

Charlie's Mum
10-12-2011, 05:46 PM
Or, if you really want to stick with oils, Water-soluble ones have less smell and a 'safer' in a confined space.

OR

Use the acrylics mixed to a nice thick creamy consistency and you have time to blend - 'course, not the extended time oils give but satisfying all the same :)

Raymo
10-12-2011, 06:30 PM
Stay away from oils and linseed, youre gonna burn your house or shed down.

Einion
10-13-2011, 03:43 AM
Stay away from oils and linseed, youre gonna burn your house or shed down.
Er, what?

Einion

Raymo
10-13-2011, 12:06 PM
Spontaneous combustion.

timelady
10-13-2011, 12:21 PM
Oil paints and linseed oil have very low combustion temperatures. That's why it's safe to take them on airplanes, even carry-on. (most oil paint manufacturers have documents you can print out for the airlines) You'd do well to research paint contents before making such scary statements! It's only mediums that contain turpentine or white spirits (like Liquin) that pose a danger.

As for the original question... stick with oils if that's what you like. I always painted with oils in the house. Use oil for cleanup instead of spirits - it will work on both surfaces and brushes. If you do need to use spirits just use a bit and close the container afterwards. Make sure rags are in a fire-proof container (which applies even in your outdoor studio too). Really you shouldn't have much of a problem. If you have ventilation but just don't like the smell of turps/spirits then use a low-odor version. (keep in mind these still have the same chemicals, they just smell different) I've also done the space-heater thing too. :) When my (oils) studio was a greenhouse in the garden.

Tina.

RiJoRi
10-13-2011, 01:06 PM
Go with the space heater. Or two. You do NOT want your Mom upset with you! The phrase "Gedt Oudt!" comes to mind, along with my Dad's saying, "The front door swings both ways, you know!" (It didn't, but I got the idea, anyway!)

--Rich

Raymo
10-13-2011, 01:56 PM
Oil paints and linseed oil have very low combustion temperatures. That's why it's safe to take them on airplanes, even carry-on. (most oil paint manufacturers have documents you can print out for the airlines) You'd do well to research paint contents before making such scary statements!

You need to do some Googlin'.......do not....I repeat....do not leave linseed soaked rags lying around.

timelady
10-13-2011, 08:00 PM
You'll notice the point in my post about rags then. :)

ecobb
10-14-2011, 01:51 AM
"I could easily go find out myself by doing just that." Go for it. I've been scraping acrylic I put over oil for several years now. Has an interesting effect.

Einion
10-14-2011, 03:13 AM
It's perfectly okay to warn about potential risks from materials but a little detail would be useful to say the least, so that it doesn't come across as scaremongering... a blanket warning that painting in oils poses a risk of burning the house down isn't exactly helpful ;)

So, spontaneous combustion can occur when rags, or paper, soaked in drying oils are left in a tight bundle open to the air, particularly (but not only) when it's warm or there is a source of heat like direct sunlight or a nearby heater/radiator/heating vent.

Einion