PDA

View Full Version : recycled paper - help.


Honor
09-28-2011, 01:21 PM
Hi there

just need some advise hope that this is the right place to get it.

I have a journal that I just bought. I drew a picture in pencil in it and quickly realized that the paper was piling (for lack of a better word)

the paper is recycled paper and it has flowers.

Has anyone worked with this type of paper before? what is best to use to draw on it. I really love the journal. I was thinking of changing the paper in it if I can not find something to use on it.

I did try water colour but the paper one soaked it up quickly. any suggestions please

Use Her Name
09-28-2011, 03:57 PM
In many cases, you need to use paper that was made for certain arts. Maybe try using a fixative on it first of you want to draw on it? Like hair-spray.

lawn jockey
09-28-2011, 08:08 PM
I wa svery challenged doing watercolours on handmade paper but by layering the colours it worked out well. I am trying to find a new paper made of horse manure, its called poopoopaper and it has a nice texture.

Diane Cutter
09-29-2011, 06:50 AM
I wa svery challenged doing watercolours on handmade paper but by layering the colours it worked out well. I am trying to find a new paper made of horse manure, its called poopoopaper and it has a nice texture.
Oh my gosh... I thought you were kidding but googled and found this: http://www.poopoopaper.com/ It looks like it would be great for collage...

Diane

Andrew
09-29-2011, 09:05 AM
I wa svery challenged doing watercolours on handmade paper but by layering the colours it worked out well. I am trying to find a new paper made of horse manure, its called poopoopaper and it has a nice texture.

I heard about this paper on NPR. My initial response was less than dignified. Now that I have visitied the website (Thanks Diane!) and have heard someone use it, I may have to give it a go.

As to the OP, I currently have some natural handmade hemp paper sketchbooks that are relatively soft and absorbant. They take ink and watercolour like a dream, but hard pencils not-so-much. They drag to much against the surface and more etch than draw. Try a softer carbon or ebony pencil verse a harder office or drawing pencil.

Alternatively, you can take some acrylic medium or a good pva glue (not the school white glue, that will soften again if it gets damp), and thin to a consistency like heavy cream or half and half. And brush it into the pages to harden up the fibers. This would also be a good idea if you want to incorporate some collage, as it would create a much more inviting surface for adhesives.

Andrew

Diane Cutter
09-29-2011, 09:22 AM
I apologize for getting off on a tangent with the other paper...

To the OP... have you tried both sides of the paper? As a printmaker, I've experienced papers with a rough and smooth side. To the eye it's hardly visible but you can actually feel a bit of furriness sometimes. The smooth side would be comfortable for a pencil, the furry would be rougher.

It also seems that it is unsized, soaking up the watercolor and probably spreading where you don't want the color. Like Andrew suggests, you might to give it a light spray to overcome that... Or you might want to work with watercolor pencils and then go back in with a damp brush to move the color with more control.

I have used this type of paper and watercolor but have done it with finished prints. Since I used oil-based ink, the oily ink lines actually create a barrier for the watercolor, not letting it get 'outside the lines.'

Diane

Andrew
09-29-2011, 09:55 AM
I apologize for getting off on a tangent with the other paper...

To the OP... have you tried both sides of the paper? As a printmaker, I've experienced papers with a rough and smooth side. To the eye it's hardly visible but you can actually feel a bit of furriness sometimes. The smooth side would be comfortable for a pencil, the furry would be rougher.

It also seems that it is unsized, soaking up the watercolor and probably spreading where you don't want the color. Like Andrew suggests, you might to give it a light spray to overcome that... Or you might want to work with watercolor pencils and then go back in with a damp brush to move the color with more control.

I have used this type of paper and watercolor but have done it with finished prints. Since I used oil-based ink, the oily ink lines actually create a barrier for the watercolor, not letting it get 'outside the lines.'

Diane

No need to apologize Diane. Nothing with Poo is every totally off topic, it is always just lying there.

Acrylics, litho crayons, oil pastels, and china markers also make good barriers on very absorbant paper.

Andrew

Honor
10-03-2011, 11:51 AM
Thanks everyone

I will try to size the paper before I work on it with softer pencils.

I did try the water colour pencils and then wet brush that seems to be "ok" however I did not like the out come of the picture. (maybe I need more practise in that medium )

I will also check the paper and see if there is one side that is a little less softer then the other side I did not think about that before. I know that canvas has a different feel on each side.

Thank you all for the great suggestions I will post and let you know how it goes.

p.s. I will look into poopy paper too. sounds interesting to say the least.