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equinespirit
09-13-2011, 03:57 AM
Sorry, I know this has been done before but I read so much on here, forget to bookmark it and then cant find it again :rolleyes:

I want to teach my 11 yr old son art and was planning on working through the classes on here and the D&S board , in fact he did his first one from there yesterday and loved it :D

But what books would you guys reccomend to help us?

Thanks

Capra_Aegagrus
09-13-2011, 06:02 AM
'Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain' by Betty Edwards would have to be the best beginner book I've read. Good luck!

Davkin
09-13-2011, 11:35 AM
I personally think "Your Artist's Brain" by Carl Purcell is a much better book than "Drawing on the right side" which is very clinical. Carl Purcell covers similar concepts but breaks it down into very simple easy to bite chunks that even your 11 year old will understand. With the Betty Edwards book you'll have to read it first and explain the concepts and exercises to your son, it's unlikely he'll understand the book or maintain interest if he tries to read it himself.

David

allydoodle
09-13-2011, 04:38 PM
I personally think "Your Artist's Brain" by Carl Purcell is a much better book than "Drawing on the right side" which is very clinical. Carl Purcell covers similar concepts but breaks it down into very simple easy to bite chunks that even your 11 year old will understand. With the Betty Edwards book you'll have to read it first and explain the concepts and exercises to your son, it's unlikely he'll understand the book or maintain interest if he tries to read it himself.

David

I also recommend this book.

I was surprised to see just how simply written "Your Artist's Brain" is. I've been painting for what seems like forever, and I really wish I had had that book "way back when", when I was just starting out. I think it would have helped me move along much quicker. Most of what I now know that is in that book I had to learn by osmosis and observation, figuring it out for myself. We all know that takes much longer.......

equinespirit
09-13-2011, 05:08 PM
Thanks guys!
Ive started him on Mike Sibleys book atm as I already have it and learnt a lot from it myself but would like to teach him about other mediums etc once hes mastered drawing and sketching.

DAK723
09-13-2011, 05:18 PM
I would be very careful at that age to make sure that learning from books doesn't become a task. At 11 years old I would encourage him to draw the things he likes (for me that was drawing from sports photographs). It should be fun! Not sure these adult how-to books are the right thing for a kid. On the other hand, he may really like them! If not - he has plenty of time when he gets older. Just my 2 cents.

Don

equinespirit
09-13-2011, 06:26 PM
I agree Don, I think *all* learning should be fun, inspirational and enjoyable.
Hes learning some basic stuff atm but that will be incorporated into him drawing what he enjoys in each lesson.
I had the same approach to my own journey-I started right in with horses :lol: so I would be a hypocrite to approach it any other way.

Talley
09-13-2011, 06:44 PM
For a slightly different take, I'd also recommend Carla Sonheim's Drawing Lab for Mixed Media Artists

http://www.amazon.com/Drawing-Lab-Mixed-Media-Artists-Exercises/dp/1592536131/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1315949806&sr=8-1

The 52 projects are fun and suitable for both children and adults. I enjoyed them anyway and I think they'd be really fun to do with a child. And I felt they helped me to loosen up. One of the great things about the exercises is that you do them as a basic project and then if you want you can keep layering on different levels of complexity.

robertsloan2
09-13-2011, 11:32 PM
I'll add my recommendation for Your Artist's Brain by Carl Purcell.

Also three or four books by Jack Hamm - Drawing the Head and Figure, How to Draw Animals, Drawing Scenery: Landscapes and Seascapes and Cartooning the Head and Figure. There are also some similar volumes by Andrew Loomis online for free if he can work from a screen. Depends on what subjects stimulate him.

I used to love art books at that age. One thing I really liked were the Walter Foster oversize art books when they were on subjects I liked - the sea, cats, landscapes, big cats, various animals and wildlife. If he's into drawing SF and fantasy subjects, James Gurney's books are wonderful.

equinespirit
09-14-2011, 03:42 AM
Thanks both!
And Robert, how ever did you guess it would be SF and fantasy? boys hey? :rolleyes: :lol: