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View Full Version : New mop, Isabey, Raphael, Alvaro??


lalle81
07-18-2011, 04:16 PM
Hi!

Thought I would invest in two really good squirrel mops that can last for many years to come! :)


Iīve looked into Raphael, Isabey and Alvaro squirrel mops.. If you have tested these, please give me some info about them! :)
I donīt want them to floppy. They should be good and soft for washes and with good pointing, but not tooo soft!


What sizes do you think will fit, one for studio (half sheet and larger) and the other one for plein air (quarter sheet and smaller)??
Then I thought I would buy a rigger as well. Do you have any recommendations on that one? size and brand?


Thank you

Steeleman
07-18-2011, 05:18 PM
I was a bit dumb-founded by the large scale/small number of the Isabey mops. My 10 is HUGE...thought I was getting something vaguely close to a 10/12 round sable. I love it; it points well but its MASSIVE...an 8 would be plenty big for 1/2 sheet work...
Probably can't go wrong with any of them...good luck and have fun! ; )

Bobar57
07-19-2011, 05:11 AM
But all of them will be floppy.That's something inherent with blue squirrel hair,nothing you can do about it.

Bob

Marcio C
07-19-2011, 09:33 AM
I have a Raphael, which I think is too floppy (hairs too long, it looses its shape--stays bent after a stroke). Instead, I use Rekab 302s mops, which hold their shape better and are cheaper. These are the brushes Zbukvic uses. I am so happy with mine, in sizes #6 and #8, that I never bothered to try the Isabeys (which look identical to the Raphael) or Alvaro's new brushes. I use Sceptre Gold synthetic sable mix riggers, size 3, and don't think you need to worry about getting any better than that, unless you are doing nautical work that depends on riggers. I also use Escoda Perla synthetic rounds, sizes 12 and 10 (again the same brushes Zbukvic uses).
I use some other brushes occasionally, but the ones above account for 90% of my work.
Oh, and the Rekabs and Escodas last a long time, I have used mine on paper for two years without a difference. I'm rough on my brushes during painting, but take good care of them between sessions.

On a separate note, I've noticed wear on the brushes I use on Aquabord, but that surface eats up brushes of any kind anyway.

Steeleman
07-19-2011, 10:35 AM
Marcio; where do you purshase your Rekab brushes?

Marcio C
07-19-2011, 10:38 AM
Jack, in the US, the only place to order their mops is directly from the distributor, Armadillo Art & Craft, at
http://armadilloart.com/
You can email or call them, the service is great and prompt, the prices are good.

msm02
07-20-2011, 02:03 PM
Andreas, I use Isabey and Winsor Newton mops. I also have a DaVinci Spin Synthetic mop that is fun to use, great for expressive lines. I'd like to try the new synthetic Princeton Neptune mops which are more like a traditional mop, but cheaper. Friends who have used Alvaro's brushes weren't happy with the quality. Wish Escoda would make a mop brush...

Michael from PDX

Bobar57
07-20-2011, 02:31 PM
The ones made by Jackson's in the UK are of excellent quality(series 828)and affordable.Pure blue squirrel hair,natural quill and bronze wiring with knots that won't snag or scratch.Long tapered handle.

Bob

photodork
07-20-2011, 03:32 PM
i have a #6 and #2 of the w+n squirrel mops. lovely brushes, less expensive than isabey.

CarlosBS
07-20-2011, 03:49 PM
I have a Davinci Mop size 6 (16 mm 43 mm) (it is equivalent to Isabey size 8)
And a Raphael 4.

Both are high quality, and come to a point when wet, yet both of them are floppy like any squirrel mop.

DN Manel
07-20-2011, 03:54 PM
Isabey no. 6 for smaller (quarter sheet) work, no. 8 or 10 for larger. But there are other cheaper alternatives, quality probably the same.

Neeman
07-21-2011, 12:02 AM
Rekab

I have had mine for years and they still hold their needle point
They are excellent and less expensive than other brands

seedy
07-21-2011, 09:26 AM
I have both the #6 and #8 Rekab 320S Kazan Squirrel. I find the # 6 more than enough. Keeps a tremendous point, holds lots of paint and does not flop.
After years of dipping, dipping and dipping again with a rigger, I broke down and bought a #10 Escoda Optimo Kolinsky 1310 and although I have never tried others, I can do tree limbs like crazy with one charge.
Good luck with your serch.

DN Manel
07-21-2011, 09:33 AM
I forgot about riggers. Can only recommend daVinci 5519 series. Fantastic brush, unbelievable control and holding capacity. You won't be looking for a rigger anymore.

lalle81
07-21-2011, 09:51 AM
Thank you all so much for your advice!

I Will check out the brushes fr.o.m. Rekab! Sounds like good brushes!

What size do you use on the rigger?

DN Manel
07-21-2011, 12:37 PM
I have two, bigger #8 and smaller #5.

Salvador_Matisse
08-03-2011, 03:10 AM
Hi!

Thought I would invest in two really good squirrel mops that can last for many years to come! :)
Iīve looked into Raphael, Isabey and Alvaro squirrel mops.. If you have tested these, please give me some info about them! :)
I donīt want them to floppy. They should be good and soft for washes and with good pointing, but not tooo soft!


Squirrel hair is floppy and nothing can be done with it. It can hardly pick up any pigment straight from the paint well, so often you'll need to mix the paint with water in your tray with some other brush and then use a mop to pick up that mix and apply onto paper.

If you use mop too often to mix the paint in your tray, your fine point goes blunt quicker, and the brush wears off faster. I suggest you use some cheaper synthetic brush to mix paint.

Don't spend too much on mops in the beginning. Expensive mops (like size 8, 10 or 12) are good to cover for big sheet sizes, but you'll be more than happy with mop size 4 for a 1/4 sheet paper, where you can exercise a lot.

Get two from two different manufacturers. I have Raphael's and Rosemary and Co's and they are both great.

Here's the link to Rosemary's: https://www.rosemaryandco.com/index.php?cPath=277_387

lalle81
08-03-2011, 06:04 AM
I just discovered Squirrel mops (170) from Rosemary & Co.

Have anyone had a chance to try them out? What did you think about them?

virgil carter
08-03-2011, 12:19 PM
A tip for pulling paint from the palette with mops:

--Have the paint moist and soft in the palette compartment (spritz and/or use fresh paint prior to starting);
--Dampen the mop and "pull" the color from the compartment to the palette with the heel and belly of the mop. If you do this carefully, you can actually "point" the brush tip as you pull the color into the paletter area;
--Fill the brush fiblers by elevating the brush and gently rolling and rotating the brush into the paint mixture until the brush is fully charged.

If the brush is saturated with a high water ratio, you may want to gently blot the brush on a paper towel or sponge before application of paint.

Using this approach, you are saving the brush tip for applying paint and using the belly and heel to do all the pre-application work.

It takes longer to describe it, than to do it!

Sling paint!
Virgil

seedy
08-03-2011, 02:23 PM
An excellent tip, Virgil. Thanks.

virgil carter
08-03-2011, 06:29 PM
To make this technique of loading a mop really work, one needs a palette with large wells, dare I say Man-Sized Wells?

None of those little prissy half box, or even full box, wells of a $500 Craig Young custom brass palette, where all one can do is grind down the tip of a mop trying to pry paint out of a tiny container! Castaget can do it because he get his brushes free from his sponsoring brush company. The rest of us have to figure out how to keep our brushes pointing.

So, painters unite! Toss those prissy brass palettes and buy something with a truly man-sized set of wells! Like this: http://www.cheapjoes.com/art-supply/MU3040_21285_martin-universal-design-mijello-silver-nano-watercolor-palette.asp

Your mops will thank you! And your points will be perpetual! Live in Peace!

GD&R for cover!
Virgil

Salvador_Matisse
08-03-2011, 11:03 PM
To make this technique of loading a mop really work, one needs a palette with large wells, dare I say Man-Sized Wells?

None of those little prissy half box, or even full box, wells of a $500 Craig Young custom brass palette, where all one can do is grind down the tip of a mop trying to pry paint out of a tiny container! Castaget can do it because he get his brushes free from his sponsoring brush company. The rest of us have to figure out how to keep our brushes pointing.

So, painters unite! Toss those prissy brass palettes and buy something with a truly man-sized set of wells! Like this: http://www.cheapjoes.com/art-supply/MU3040_21285_martin-universal-design-mijello-silver-nano-watercolor-palette.asp

Your mops will thank you! And your points will be perpetual! Live in Peace!

GD&R for cover!
Virgil


Hi Virgil,
That is good advice for working indoors, where one can work really big size and where big mops are necessary — big palette is a life saviour.

But for outdoors, a smaller size mop can work well with smaller wells. Regardless of size, I suggest mixing of paint should be done with a round synthetic brush. Then sable rounds, squirrel mops, etc. should be used to apply paint mixture onto paper.

I mean, just look at interior design trade painters: they don't mix colours with their specialised, expensive trade brushes, but with 'twigs', mixers and other tools. I'm not sure why fine art painters should be different and not save their tools? ;)

And I agree, that we shouldn't follow what big name painters do, because they do (or may) have sponsors of some kind.

Salvador_Matisse
08-03-2011, 11:09 PM
I just discovered Squirrel mops (170) from Rosemary & Co.

Have anyone had a chance to try them out? What did you think about them?

I have them and they are as good as any others.

Also take a look at their series 41:
https://www.rosemaryandco.com/index.php?cPath=277_388

Not many painters use squirrel filberts, but they are so versatile, extraordinary brushes. It's like having three brushes in one. I use them all the time. John Hoar uses them too. (See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0oyShuo80M)

CarlosBS
08-03-2011, 11:34 PM
To make this technique of loading a mop really work, one needs a palette with large wells, dare I say Man-Sized Wells?

None of those little prissy half box, or even full box, wells of a $500 Craig Young custom brass palette, where all one can do is grind down the tip of a mop trying to pry paint out of a tiny container! Castaget can do it because he get his brushes free from his sponsoring brush company. The rest of us have to figure out how to keep our brushes pointing.

So, painters unite! Toss those prissy brass palettes and buy something with a truly man-sized set of wells! Like this: http://www.cheapjoes.com/art-supply/MU3040_21285_martin-universal-design-mijello-silver-nano-watercolor-palette.asp

Your mops will thank you! And your points will be perpetual! Live in Peace!

GD&R for cover!
Virgil

I have this one and find it great
http://www.cheapjoes.com/art-supplies/21270_anderson-folding-palettes.asp

charlestoncaine
08-08-2011, 11:15 PM
But all of them will be floppy.That's something inherent with blue squirrel hair,nothing you can do about it.

Bob
Not really, they snap to a point. They are more "floppy" than a sable but it's not an issue. You make them sound like a blob of cotton on a stick which they are not. Oriental brush painting has been using squirrels for a thousand years for calligraphy and then most elegant of strokes possible.
Sable is wonderful for retaining fluid but lacks the subtlety if squirrel in stroke making.