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!becca
06-30-2011, 11:53 PM
Joaquin Sorolla,The Painter

Joaquin Sorolla was born in Valencina, Spain in 1863 anddied in 1923 following a stroke in 1920. He and his sister were orphaned in 1865 by the untimely death of theirparents and they were adopted by their aunt and uncle. When he was still young, his instructors saw his artistic passions and suggested that he enroll in evening drawing classes, which happened when he was 14 at the instruction of sculptor Cayetano Capuz.

When He was 21 he was awarded a scholarship to the Spanish Academy in Rome. Afterward, he had avery productive career producing over 500 paintings in 4 years to feature inhis first solo show in Paris in 1906. This was followed by solo shows in Berlinin 1907, London in 1908, and New York in 1909 with shows in Chicago and StLouis in 1911. Following these exhibits he contracted to produce murals, “The Vision of Spain” which took 7 years tocomplete. The mural project was said tobe very stressful and I read it may have contributed to his decline in health and resulting stroke.

Sorolla’s style was surely his own, but it was influenced by the Impressionism of his time; and he was acquainted with John Singer Sargent.He also became impressed with the images of photography and though he did notpaint from photo references, but from life, he strove to achieve the light he witnessed in his father-in-law’s photo images. He was a very fast painter, completing a painting in 2 to 4 mornings of painting, even on his large canvases. Hepainted, often on the beach, 6 days a week, usually in a suit. Sorolla preferred to paint even his portraits in natural daylight rather than a studiosetting. He was a plein airpainter. His brushwork is bold andlively and his ability to capture light and color profound. The compositions were not usually decided inadvance but unfolded on his canvas as his painting progressed. It was said he would sometimes use a palettethe size of a piano and brushes with three foot handles to give him betterperspective of his work.

Generally, Sorolla’s canvases were gigantic, but I did finda few studies that were normal to small in size. Many are life size or larger. And, usually they were braced up outsidewhere he preferred to create his magic, sometimes with a crew to shade his workfrom the sun with sheets. His specialmagic, along with is brushwork, was capturing light and he did this withmasterful use of value and relative color temperature. He always painted light a mid-tone gray orlighter and shadows a mid-tone gray or darker. All his work shows a two tone jump in value between light andshadow. His half tones were usually verylight, which is the effect found in natural sunlight. As for temperature, warm light wascomplemented with cool shadow color and cool light with warm shadow color.

He began his career with an earthy palette and evolved touse one filled with vibrant color. Thecolors on his palette varied with his subject, but were vast and after 1900consisted of black, burnt umber, raw umber, rose madder, burnt sienna, rawsienna, yellow ochre, Naples yellow, vermillion, cobalt blue and lead white forhis studio palette. His outdoor paletteincluded cobalt violet, rose madder, all the cadmium reds, cadmium orange, allthe cadmium yellows, yellow ochre, chrome green (later replaced by permanentgreen light), viridian, Prussian blue, cobalt blue, French ultramarine and leadwhite.

For a period of time Sorolla taught at the Chicago ArtInstitute. His philosophy of teachingart was as unique as his style of painting. He didn’t believe in creating masters copies, rather he encouraged studentsto follow their own vision and paint their own original work of whateverinspired them. He also was adverse toclose instruction of his students because he felt as individuals each artisthas a unique vision and should not be directed how to create.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2011/100116-Sorolla_001copy1-4.jpg













Here are a few of my favorite painting of his. I suppose I must say in his honor, you arewelcome to create copies of them and become acquainted with the great artist,Joaquin Sorolla, or you can follow your heart and create your own masterpiecesinspired in part by these.

Rocks at Javec (I don't know the size of this yet)






http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2011/100116-rocks_at_javea-large-1.jpg

Sea and Rocks 6 1/4" x 8 5/8"
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2011/100116-Sea_and_Rocks.jpg

Three Head Studies 31 1/2"x 18 1/2"
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2011/100116-tres_cabezas_de_estudio-large.jpg

Museo de Bellas Artyrd de Valencia un su Histotrica 6'1" x 6'6"
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2011/100116-grupa_valenciana-large.jpg

The Horse's Bath 80 3/4" x 98 3/8"
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2011/100116-el_bano_del_caballo-large-1.jpg

Leaving the Bath 69 1/4" x 43 3/4"
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2011/100116-saliendo_del_bano-large-1.jpg

Noon at Valenca Beach 25 1/4" x 381/4"
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2011/100116-Noon_at_Valencia_Beach.jpg

!becca
06-30-2011, 11:58 PM
Hi everyone, I hope you can read the text above. Of course loading it was not as smooth as I had hoped. If there are problems let me know and I will try to find a fix.

saintlukesguild
07-01-2011, 12:24 AM
Born in 1663 and died in 1923? Great genes!

!becca
07-01-2011, 12:29 AM
thanks

ArtyRolina
07-01-2011, 05:24 AM
Great write up, Becca and what wonderful photos. Heh, I was just about to say I cannot take part because I still haven't completed my Venus in the last Masters thread, but looking at those landscapes, I am sorely tempted.

Even if I don't join in, I shall follow closely!

!becca
07-01-2011, 06:53 AM
Thank you, Rolina, I hope you try just one. There are a variety of sizes as examples above.

Marigold
07-01-2011, 06:54 AM
Hello Becca,

Thanks for introducing another exciting MOM project! I am looking forward to the interpretations of WC Members and to making myself more familiar with Sorolla's work. I know no other painter who paints so wonderfully authentic paintings of people surrounded by sunshine, wind and waves. How could anyone not feel happy looking at those pictures!

I plan on participating if I find the time, but I have to finish Alexandre Cabanel first otherwise my head will explode... they are so different.

Susanne

!becca
07-01-2011, 06:57 AM
Susanne, you are right, they are so different. I hope you finish Cabanel and find something here to try.

lovin art
07-01-2011, 07:16 AM
Becc Im coming back to this , its bookmarked :thumbsup: , must say thankyou for being a great REALLY great guide , wc is lucky to have you !!:heart: :clap:

!becca
07-01-2011, 07:19 AM
Thank you, Sandra, you are too kind.:o :heart:

karenlee
07-01-2011, 07:40 AM
Thank you so much! One of my top five favorites. That is terrific. Great work!

!becca
07-01-2011, 07:49 AM
Karen, you are welcome. This should be great fun.

stapeliad
07-01-2011, 09:33 AM
Becc, this looks great, thanks for hosting!!! :heart:

!becca
07-01-2011, 09:50 AM
Jessica, thank you. :heart: You have set the bar pretty high for this hosting stuff...I will do the best I can.

Graham T
07-01-2011, 10:35 AM
Thanks for starting this thread. One of my favourite artists, I may have a stab at one of these, time permitting.

JDWooldridge
07-01-2011, 10:37 AM
Here's one I might be able to get into! Now if I can only find the time....

!becca
07-01-2011, 10:39 AM
Graham, JD, this is a two month thread. Surely there will be time in there somewhere.:)

Graham T
07-01-2011, 10:40 AM
Well I hope so, but life can be very busy at times. And the wife and I are expecting a rather momentous and life-changing event on Monday...

!becca
07-01-2011, 10:42 AM
Graham, is that what it sounds like?

stapeliad
07-01-2011, 10:43 AM
A baby?? :D

Graham T
07-01-2011, 10:45 AM
All very hush hush for now I'm afraid - you'll just have to wait 'til Monday!

!becca
07-01-2011, 10:46 AM
I can hardly wait!

JDWooldridge
07-01-2011, 11:03 AM
Becca, one would think that in 2 months I could find the time....but I'm busy in a very good way. 3 clients in line, a charitable donation painting, and I'm working on a body of work for what will hopefully turn into a show. But if I can get some of that out of the way then I'll definitely tackle one!!

!becca
07-01-2011, 11:06 AM
JD, I recognize that type of time crunch! Good luck with it all, and I hope you can join us here at some time.

pcj
07-01-2011, 12:27 PM
Hello Becca,

I'd like to take part too [ after I finish last month's 'monk' ]

Is it alright if I do Sorolla's 'Beached Boats' instead of
one of the listed choices ?

See image thumbnail below and link for larger image.
http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/detail.php?ID=42686
Patricia

!becca
07-01-2011, 12:31 PM
Patricia, yes! Of course! Sorolla produced so many fabulous painting, your choice is lovely.

dollardays
07-02-2011, 03:47 PM
Thanks so much for putting this together, Becca. I just got back from a plain air painting vacation and I will try at least one of these- maybe more. I am so attracted to this artist's work. He was a real "artists' artist".
(That does sound like a baby for Graham lol)

!becca
07-02-2011, 04:05 PM
Nora, I am so glad you may join me here. You are right...he was an artist's artist. I can't wait to see your plein air!

Carey Griffel
07-02-2011, 06:02 PM
Becca, thanks for hosting, I will be able to participate for a change! :D Yay. Looking forward to it and seeing what the others do, of course.

~!Carey

!becca
07-02-2011, 06:11 PM
Yay, Carey, so glad you will be joining in.:D It will be an interesting 2 months I am sure.

Beautiful_Butterflies_Studio
07-02-2011, 08:58 PM
Becca, I would LOVE to jump in, the paintings are so alive and beautiful!
QUESTION - I want to emulate the three head studies, but I lack many of the colours listed - is it okay to use a very limited palette, as I may have to unless I spend money I don't have! :eek:
THANKYOU for such an interesting challenge!

Gentle Hugs, Stacey

!becca
07-02-2011, 11:20 PM
Stacey, please join in. Just looking I would guess the head studies were done during the period when Sorolla used primarily earthtones as opposed to the later palette listed so don't feel you can't join in. :)

zoi_p
07-03-2011, 04:24 PM
"He didn’t believe in creating masters copies, rather he encouraged studentsto follow their own vision and paint their own original work of whateverinspired them".
:D Don't listen to him!!!
I am still hostage of Cabanel's hairdresser. Otherwise I would try the first one, I like the colours and the light. And probably I wouldnt struggle so much- no figures included.

!becca
07-03-2011, 04:43 PM
zoi, join us when you finish Cabanel.:D

Marigold
07-04-2011, 05:15 AM
Hello All,

Because I might have no time for a real serious copy, I want to practice at least with a small study of the painting below. Some questions:

I had a look at some closeups, and it appears to me as if the "base color" for much of the water area is grey - where the paint is brushed thinly, there often seems to be a grey or neutral color beneath. I found this surprising, because the painting overall looks bright and colorful. Ist this typical for Sorolla's paintings? Do you think he used chromatic greys (as black is not listed amoung the paints for his plein air palette)? Has anyone seen Sorolla originals and has noticed if he painted on white or toned canvas?

Susanne

!becca
07-04-2011, 07:34 AM
Susanne, I don't know for sure and have not saw any originals...here are a few links that might help.

http://www.sorollapaintings.com/sorolla_approach.htm

http://www.sovek.com/publications/articles/sorolla/index.htm

He does have a very colorful approach. The palette listed is not just plein air as he painted portraits as will outside whenever possible. I am so glad you will be joining us..:)

!becca
07-04-2011, 08:14 AM
Here are a few more links for a wonderful collection of images...

http://www.joaquin-sorolla-y-bastida.org/

http://www.artrenewal.org/pages/artist.php?artistid=1393

dollardays
07-06-2011, 12:14 PM
Hello All,

Because I might have no time for a real serious copy, I want to practice at least with a small study of the painting below. Some questions:

I had a look at some closeups, and it appears to me as if the "base color" for much of the water area is grey - where the paint is brushed thinly, there often seems to be a grey or neutral color beneath. I found this surprising, because the painting overall looks bright and colorful. Ist this typical for Sorolla's paintings? Do you think he used chromatic greys (as black is not listed amoung the paints for his plein air palette)? Has anyone seen Sorolla originals and has noticed if he painted on white or toned canvas?

Susanne


Susanne-- I see it as a raw umber colored underpainting. Kind of a warm gray.... I think it will serve you well.

!becca
07-06-2011, 12:24 PM
Nora, you could be right...I wish I knew for sure. Could be a greyed green as well. I think you could achieve the color with unber...and, the most important aspect is the brushwork.

EZ-ED
07-06-2011, 01:33 PM
haven't been here for a while, but here is phase one of Noon at Beachhttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jul-2011/121150-006crop72.jpg

!becca
07-06-2011, 01:46 PM
Ed, so nice to see you here again and joining us with Sorolla...this is a real favorite of mine. You have a good start, what size are you working?

EZ-ED
07-06-2011, 01:55 PM
Thanks Becca..... this is 12x16
I normally work in 11x14 but had this board laying here pre-gessoed.

EZ-ED
07-06-2011, 01:58 PM
in case any one is interested in the color used for the umbrella
Mussini Naples Yellow deep and W&N raw umber green shade. I may have used some burnt umber in stays and pole.

!becca
07-06-2011, 03:16 PM
Ed, thanks for the colors..the umbrella is looking very good. And, the 12x16 size is slightly better than 11x14 for this one anyway.

Marigold
07-07-2011, 02:51 AM
Susanne-- I see it as a raw umber colored underpainting. Kind of a warm gray.... I think it will serve you well.

Thanks Nora. I never paint alla prima and so I am unfamiliar with the way an underpainting could be used in this type pf painting. My original plan was to paint this in one go - but I changed my mind when I noticed how difficult it is to have to cover the canvas while trying to get those strong, well-defined brushstrokes at the same time. So I decided to cover the canvas first, and now I have kind of an underpainting. I have used raw umber and in places burnt sienna to grey down the blues a bit. The boy has completely the wrong color - I just blocked him in to have an indication of the warm-cold color scheme.

Becca, thank you for the links. The Sovek page had some useful information. And browsing through those collections of Sorrola paintings is a treat. :)

Ed, thanks for showing you painting! I think you captured the colors wonderfully! Somehow at first it looked to me as if the kids were playing in the snow instead of the water... maybe because of the round strokes?

Susanne

!becca
07-07-2011, 03:00 AM
Susanne, looks like you have found a reasonable approach. When I paint, I place my drawing on canvas with whatever color paint I have toned then begin painting. I find it is important to paint the lights directly to the canvas as opposed to using them on top of a darker color, the same with darks...trying to keep them pure. IN your case, you can use your underpainting to serve as your drawing..

Thank you again for joining in.:)

Marigold
07-07-2011, 04:00 PM
I find it is important to paint the lights directly to the canvas as opposed to using them on top of a darker color, the same with darks...trying to keep them pure.
Thanks becca, this is good advice and I agree totally. But how will you do that on an impressionist piece like this? It is pretty high key to start with, and has almost no real shadow (as in form shadow) but is really a mosaic of light and dark patches. Anyway I think I can work with what I have...

Susanne

!becca
07-07-2011, 04:06 PM
Susanne, nearly everything I paint is alla prima, I follow that course regularily, and I wish I had a good wip to show you to explain. But, your approach wiill work here as well I think. I am looking forward to seeing your progress.

!becca
07-09-2011, 03:28 PM
I don't know when I will be able to do a larger painting here, so I painted his small study, Sea and Rocks. Mine is 6"x8".

My palette included, raw sienna, burnt sienna, raw umber, burnt umber, rose madder, cobalt blue, cobalt violet, viridian, chrom green, ultramarine blue, and lead white.

First I toned my canvas lightly with cobalt violet because I saw it throughout the painting and the general color seemed cool.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jul-2011/100116-my_paintings_008copy4.jpg

Then I located the rocks by color and placement and general shape.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jul-2011/100116-my_paintings_009copy4.jpg

I then started painting the waves, tinting my lights as I painted.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jul-2011/100116-my_paintings_012copy4.jpg

My finished painting is not a perfect copy. The abstract nature of the painting is actually a challenge to do.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Jul-2011/100116-my_paintings_014copy4.jpg


I enjoyed this very much. First painting water while we are in a major drought is a real pleasure. Also it was my first time to use lead white, it is wonderful for the impasto effect of this painting. I recommend it.

ArtyRolina
07-09-2011, 05:35 PM
Becca - such a great interpretation and thank you so much for showing the work in progress, it is fascinating to see an experienced alla prima painter at work!

Susanne, that is coming along well and is how I would approach the painting too.

EZ-ED, this is a great painting to tackle - the inclusion of the umbrella is such fun and you have done a wonderful job so far.

Graham, your masterpiece (photo on your blog) is probably the best of all, though!

I am still working (slowly) on my Cabanel, so it will be a month before I get to try one of these. I think I would like to try one of the coastal ones and then try to paint a place on the East coast of Scotland that I particularly love that is quite similar.

Great work everyone!

!becca
07-09-2011, 05:53 PM
Rolina, thank you for the lovely comments, and I do look forward to you joining in.:)

!becca
07-09-2011, 05:58 PM
And, yes, Graham, congratulations! These blessed blogs won't let me comment!:confused:

pcj
07-09-2011, 06:04 PM
Hello Everyone,
I made a start on Sorolla's 'Beached Boats' . Working slowly
because I'm still working on last month's Cabanel.
Patricia
edit: Size is 8" X 10"
Winsor And Newton Griffin Oil Alkyds.
Colours so far: Raw sienna, burnt sienna, raw umber, burnt umber,
indian yellow [ love this colour !], ultramarine blue, alizirin crimson,
cad' red deep, WN mixing white and viridian.

!becca
07-09-2011, 06:06 PM
Patricia, lovely start!!! I love the billowing sails.

lovin art
07-09-2011, 06:51 PM
Can I just second what Rolina has posted here , Ive looked at the works , they are all to wonderful for words ...I so want to try them all but just not coping with time at the moment , at least I can gaze upon your wonderfulness to satisfy my soul :angel: :clap:


Becca - such a great interpretation and thank you so much for showing the work in progress, it is fascinating to see an experienced alla prima painter at work!

Susanne, that is coming along well and is how I would approach the painting too.

EZ-ED, this is a great painting to tackle - the inclusion of the umbrella is such fun and you have done a wonderful job so far.

Graham, your masterpiece (photo on your blog) is probably the best of all, though!

I am still working (slowly) on my Cabanel, so it will be a month before I get to try one of these. I think I would like to try one of the coastal ones and then try to paint a place on the East coast of Scotland that I particularly love that is quite similar.

Great work everyone!

!becca
07-09-2011, 07:07 PM
Sandra,:heart: thanks for dropping by. Wish you could join in, but I do understand that time thing.

Marigold
07-10-2011, 07:43 AM
Becca, yes the one you chose is difficult because everything kind of dissolves into those srtokes that suggest gushing water but are really quite abstrakt. I believe it was enjoyable and that feeling comes across.

Patricia, a beautiful choice, it is a wonderful looking painting which is perfect for studying Sorollas use of warm and cold colors. You got a splendid start.

Rolina, let us see your Cabanel :clap:I thought you had dropped out of this project! It would be great to see you paint a seascape esp. if you can bring your own impressions from similar landscapes back home in Scotland to the painting... it is different to paint something you know and love.

Susanne

!becca
07-10-2011, 08:24 AM
Susanne, I usually have fun when I paint, glad it is evident here. I have had so little time to paint lately it is painful. How is your painting progressing?

Graham T
07-10-2011, 04:04 PM
Graham, your masterpiece (photo on your blog) is probably the best of all, though!

Thanks Rolina! I don't think anybody could paint a picture nearly as beautiful

Graham T
07-10-2011, 04:06 PM
And, yes, Graham, congratulations! These blessed blogs won't let me comment!:confused:

Thank you! In a spare minute (I have only had the one since Monday...) I've adjusted the blog settings, so I hope you should be able to post now if you wanted to.

!becca
07-10-2011, 07:57 PM
Graham, well, I finally had a moment and tried again...still no luck. But I do wish you all the best and hope you will be painting again soon.:)

dollardays
07-10-2011, 09:22 PM
Becca: Your seascape is wonderful. I think the lead white is a winner for you!

pci: Beautiful beginning!

!becca
07-10-2011, 10:44 PM
Nora, thank you. I didn't comment at the time, but nearly all of it is paint directly from the tube, I only mixed the aqua and of course tinted the lights. This is a big departure for me to as I typically use a fairly limited palette, it was refreshing.

Graham T
07-11-2011, 12:15 AM
Becca, sorry you've had trouble posting. I've adjusted the settings again. Been trying to achieve a balance between being open to genuine contributors and blocking the spam merchants...

!becca
07-11-2011, 12:30 AM
Graham, I understand. First I think it is a google issue, I noticed I can't seem to comment anywhere on google this evening. But also, I have my comments set to be monitored and that has worked well in keeping the weird ones out.

Graham T
07-13-2011, 08:34 AM
Has anyone been able to find out what size the original of 'Rocks at Javea with white boat' (attached below) was? I think this is the one I will aim to do, probably around 20 x 16. My guess is that Sorolla painted it quite large - although using a big canvas in the winds blowing around on top of that headland would have been interesting!

!becca
07-13-2011, 08:43 AM
Graham, I haven't but honestly haven't taken the time to look in all my books yet...I will do that directly. I think it will fit nicly on 16x20. I have been considering that one as well.

!becca
07-13-2011, 08:57 AM
So far no luck...I will try a few other places later today.

Graham T
07-13-2011, 10:57 AM
Thanks Becca. I've done some perfunctory searching but no luck yet (and I think I hear a little person waking up for food next door!)

A few links I found, others probably have them but anyway:

http://www.the-athenaeum.org/art/by_artist.php?&sort=&id=373&p=1

http://www.joaquin-sorolla-y-bastida.org/

http://www.artrenewal.org/pages/artist.php?artistid=1393&page=3

!becca
07-13-2011, 11:11 AM
Thanks Graham, if you look a few pages back I also posted some links. You have a couple of them here and there are a few others, you will probably enjoy them. Have fun with the little one.:)

dustonpaper
07-16-2011, 10:31 AM
What I find very interesting and encouraging to many of us (just guessing) is that Sorolla also used Photographs occasionally:
http://taotothetruth.blogspot.com/2011/01/i-for-instantaneous.html
So did Anders Zorn btw:
http://taotothetruth.blogspot.com/2010/12/anders-zorn-1860-1920.html

Though I think they were that good because learned properly to paint from life first and that that is what everyone serious about painting should do if he has the opportunity, I think it is nice to see they were not afraid of photography. I often have the impression some consider a painting from a photograph less worthy than one done from life. Sorolla shows different.

Indy's Mom
07-16-2011, 12:31 PM
First I've seen these pictures from Sorolla and enjoyed them for their content and wonderful details like the wonderful horse and it's riders. Happy pictures are my favorites

pcj
07-16-2011, 08:48 PM
Hello everyone,

Did a bit more work on the 'Beached Boats' - added
the figure in the boat on the right, also more details of
the boat itself and did the first of the rigging lines [after
practicing for 1/2 hour with a scriptliner/rigger brush -
19 more to go ! :eek: ]
Excuse the distortion in the photo and the yellow cast -
the painting does have a tendency to yellow but not that
much, my camera was putting wavy lines in the images for
some reason - tried all the different settings and finally
managed to get this photo.

I liked your paint handling on your waves on the rocks, Becca,
I find this more difficult to do than last month's Cabanel.

Susanne, you have a good start to yours , have you done
any more to it ?

Patricia

!becca
07-17-2011, 06:47 AM
Dust, though there were some reports of Sorolla painting from photographs, supposedly a report that originated from Sargent, there is little evidence that this is true. Though there are many photos of him set up on location with massive canvases and palette painting various scenes. It is true his father-in-law was a photographer, there is no sound proof to my knowledge that he regularly used photos for his work.

That said, often a photograph is all some of us have to use, and I recommend careful observation of life to help make the effort most effective. And, to supplement it with life painting whenever possible, even a quick study.

Thank you for bringing the matter up.

!becca
07-17-2011, 06:49 AM
Indy's mom, thanks for stopping by.:D

Patricia, thank you. You are making beautiful progress and you are right, these copies or studies really are challenging.

dustonpaper
07-17-2011, 08:52 AM
Dust, though there were some reports of Sorolla painting from photographs, supposedly a report that originated from Sargent, there is little evidence that this is true. Though there are many photos of him set up on location with massive canvases and palette painting various scenes. It is true his father-in-law was a photographer, there is no sound proof to my knowledge that he regularly used photos for his work.

That said, often a photograph is all some of us have to use, and I recommend careful observation of life to help make the effort most effective. And, to supplement it with life painting whenever possible, even a quick study.

Thank you for bringing the matter up.
I think he and other like Zorn as well for the most part painted from life, so I do not think they used photographs regularly. I just wanted to point out that he was not sneering and photographic reference. He also worked very creative with them, the tuna-fish painting for example is composed of two photographs, which takes a lot of skill to do to make it a good painting. Without extensive experience to paint from life this would not have been possible to do for him I think.
Most painters of that period were very busy collectors of photographs and prints I read.

!becca
07-18-2011, 01:05 AM
Without extensive experience to paint from life this would not have been possible to do for him I think.


This is important and insightful...I do believe we can very carefully observe life, and sort or mentally paint from it to help our skills too.

TinaC
07-18-2011, 04:33 PM
oops, double post. Edit

!becca
07-18-2011, 04:53 PM
Tina, what happened to your image? You are right, often we learn the most from our mistakes. You are certainly focusing on the right elements.

TinaC
07-18-2011, 04:54 PM
Great work Susanne, Becca, Ez Ed and Patricia - these are pretty challenging studies eh?

On the subject of photographs as soon I started looking at which painting to study it struck me that a lot of them seemed cropped like modern photos - the edges of the parasols and hats going out of the picture, that sort of thing. I am a total novice when it comes to composition so that was just a feeling I had but I dont believe anyone could paint like Sorolla did without a huge amount of first hand observation and knowledge. If he used photos it was in the right way and as a tool and not a short cut or a crutch - as if, you'd never get all that info out of a photo especially back then.

So I thought I would do a quick study, I am entranced with Sorollas bright sunlight scenes so chose this particular one as a study in whites. Its way more complicated than I am used to so I tried not to get hung up on the drawing and just focused on two things, getting the colours and values as close as possible and trying to capture the translucent scarves. I am so pleased I just did a quick study, I learnt loads - mainly how not to do it and I can take that on to the next one!

I am very poor in photoshop but had a stab at doing that paint dropper thing to see where I went wrong compared to the master - just about everywhere.

Next time I would start with the lightest bit and work back from there, I had a huge problem getting the grades of light right. I also think I used too much ochre on the beach. One of things that I discovered was that the sky was all different shades in each part, as was the beach. And the sky through the black/green scarf was a different colour. So I think he painted each section as a jigsaw rather than from back to front (which is what I would do) i.e. paint all the sky, the sea the beach the foreground and then stick all the figures on. And what was that big white shape behind the woman on right - its hard to paint things when you dont know what they are. He knew how to put it all together though, the lights against the lighters, cools against warms - gosh there is so much in just this one painting. Really clever stuff, its like watching someone solve a rubiks cube.

I've waffled on too much, all my thoughts just tripping out. Really, I am way out of my depth here. I did enjoy it though.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jul-2011/117326-SorollaBeneathTheCanopy_edited-2_1.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jul-2011/117326-P1030450_1_edited-1a_1.jpg

!becca
07-18-2011, 05:07 PM
Tina, I think you did beautiful work for a quick study, and most importantly you learned something by it.

Marigold
07-18-2011, 06:02 PM
Great work girls! You really bring those beaches and seascapes to life!

Patricia: your study is lovely, this style seems to suit you well and you really get the colors. This painting has such beautiful warm light and such delicious warm cool color variations. What looks a bit surprising is the sky which is so much darker above the sails than below them - it looks strange because we cannot see the gradation.

Tina, I love your painting as well, you got the transparency of the fabrics and still managed to keep the sketchyness of the strokes, you did not overwork the figures which I would have found hard to do. It is good that you have a close look at the colors, but I think what matters more than the exact matching of the original colors is that the colors look right in relation to each other. Your 4 test colors seem to indicate that the problem is with values rather than colors, Sorolla has still more variation in the values of his "whites", those are very difficult to judge. Loved to read your thoughts and observations. I noticed the randomness of Sorollas composition too. He seems to just start painting and not worry about where his canvas ends. Some of the compositions come out absolutely charming, others (the majority imho) seem a bit awkward and unplanned.

I have continued my study. The boy, the boat and their reflexes on the water are still missing. I am not sure yet about my colors - I ended up breaking the blues with earth colors and greys a lot more than I had expected. I hope it will not end up looking dull. Also, I have to mix much larger batches than I am used to from layered painting. (And this is only a 12x12 format...)

Susanne

!becca
07-18-2011, 06:53 PM
Susanne, I haven't studied this particular painting and without going back to it right now...from the color you have here, i would guess the original may have had permanent green, cobalt blue and ultramarine blue. I don't know what source you are working from for a reference, but I would guess there would be more brilliance. That said, you have made lovely progress.

TinaC
07-18-2011, 06:57 PM
Susanne your water is looking good, I think when you do the boy and the highlights the whole thing will brighten up. You are the second person to mention mixed batches of colour recently. I never do that, maybe thats where I have been going wrong?

I may do this one next to continue my studies of shades of white, not sure which would be the most accurate photo though.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jul-2011/117326-SorollaPromenadebytheSea.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jul-2011/117326-SorollaStrollingalongtheseashore.jpg

Marigold
07-19-2011, 03:54 AM
Hi Tina

You are the second person to mention mixed batches of colour recently. I never do that, maybe thats where I have been going wrong?

Yes, before each session I like to pre-mix the most prevalent colors in two or tree values. I don't know about right or wrong :), but here is why I do it:

1) Mixing is much cleaner with a palette knife than with a brush. If I don't have a color already mixed on my palette I tend to do it on the fly with my brush, which does muddy my color if the brush is not clean, and it also works the color into the whole lenght of my brush instead of just at the tip, where it needs to be for a controlled brushstroke.

2) Painting for me is a very intuitive process. If I suddenly notice I need some more blue at a certain spot, I want to put it right away before I forget this impression. Then it is great to have a close match on the palette already, that just needs minimal adjustment before I can apply it. Having to mix a color from scratch feels like "interrupting the flow"

3) For the same reason, pre-mixing gives me more precision. While I prepare the mixes, I am focused on the mixing not on the painting. I take my time to match everything more carefully.

I guess it is just a matter of preference.

Your second Sorolla must be one of the most well-known, I had encountered it twice before I ever knew the painter - on a book cover and on a friend's wall. I am looking forward to see your interpretation, I am sure it will be great the last one looked like you really had fun.

Susanne

TinaC
07-19-2011, 04:49 PM
Hey guys check this out. Its a link to the Sorolla museum in Madrid and you can really zoom in on the paintings they have there. There is a viewer icon in the top right hand corner of each painting which takes you into the zooming in area. Really excellent detail.

There is also further information about the dimensions of the works and other notes.

I cant work out how to download the really hi res photos, maybe its not possible but its well worth a look. Go check out the Collections link too, I am still trying to find my way round it all, its very exciting!

http://www.spainisculture.com/museos/madrid/museo_sorolla.html?l=en&matchesPerPage=10&searchPage=1#tabbody2

Here is another more direct link to the museum, unfortunately I dont understand Spanish but I am sure there must be some interesting info there for those that do.

http://museosorolla.mcu.es/index.html

Susanne, if you havent gone on holiday yet take a look as your painting is on here. Thanks for your comments on your methods, I'm going to give it a try for my next piece coz you sure can paint!

dustonpaper
07-19-2011, 06:01 PM
Hey guys check this out. Its a link to the Sorolla museum in Madrid and you can really zoom in on the paintings they have there. There is a viewer icon in the top right hand corner of each painting which takes you into the zooming in area. Really excellent detail.

There is also further information about the dimensions of the works and other notes.

I cant work out how to download the really hi res photos, maybe its not possible but its well worth a look. Go check out the Collections link too, I am still trying to find my way round it all, its very exciting!



Thank you so much for that link. It is phantastic. If somebody knows a way to download these please let us know. I myself have no idea how to do it.

dustonpaper
07-19-2011, 06:06 PM
Here I could find 2 high resolution pictures:

http://free4444.blogspot.com/2010/07/sorolla-joaquin-promenade-by-sea-1909.html

http://free4444.blogspot.com/2010/07/sorolla-joaquin-children-on-beach-1910.html

Click on the "full resolution".

That blog has a lot of good resolution images:
http://free4444.blogspot.com/
Only two from Sorella though.

!becca
07-19-2011, 06:23 PM
Tina, thanks for the links and am glad you are enjoying exploring Sorolla.

Dust, thanks for the links.

NancyMP
07-19-2011, 07:57 PM
Tina, those links are great for working by if you can keep your network up! I'm hoping to join this challenge but I'm running one in Portraiture for the same time period myself.

I used one of those non-downloadable links to paint the Waterhouse "Lady of Shallot," and found it was so great to be able to see a close-up of any area any time I wanted to!

This is such a great challenge, Becca!

!becca
07-19-2011, 11:25 PM
Thank you, Nancy, hope you can join us.:)

NancyMP
07-20-2011, 10:12 PM
Becca, I selected a few from ARC and downloaded them, but they may have to wait until summer is over - I have a loaded schedule!

!becca
07-21-2011, 12:31 AM
Nancy, I think that is true for many of us. Which ones did you select?

Graham T
07-22-2011, 01:50 PM
Just made a start on this one today, it's my (very loose!) interpretation of Sorolla's 'Rocks at Javea'. Interesting experience already, the painting seems to be a mix of some very thinly painted, almost dry brushed areas, and a lot of much heavier applications - almost impasto in places. I suspect this one may involve a trip or two to my local art supplier for more paint...

!becca
07-22-2011, 02:00 PM
Graham, lovely start!!! I have considered trying this one if time will permit. Yes, it will take a lot of paint.lol

aureliof
07-22-2011, 03:10 PM
Becca, this inspires me to try a new Sorolla; i'll select one this weekend. The two small ones below, however, i painted last July under the spell of a wonderful book of plates. The self portrait is 8 x 10". The other is 4 x 6," a close up of one of his "pescadoras," the fisherwomen he seemed to especially reverence in his paintings. It fascinates me how the same artist who made paintings for the elite of Spanish society also painted the most humble, yet beautiful of subjects. Thanks for reminding me why he is my favorite. -- Aurelio

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Jul-2011/115206-SorollaSelf_Copy.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Jul-2011/115206-Sorolla_Pescadora.jpg

!becca
07-22-2011, 03:25 PM
Aurelio, thank you for sharing the studies...lovely.. And, you are so right, he painted with great passion for his subjects, and some illustrated the humble indeed.

purplepansey
07-22-2011, 07:11 PM
Becca, I'd like to try one as well and I picked one out and now I see it isn't on there, did you take one off of the Ninos a la orilla del mar? I don't see it.

!becca
07-22-2011, 07:49 PM
Purple, no, I didn't remove anything. If you find an image on one of the sites I have linked, you are welcome to paint it.:D I look forward to seeing what you produce.

NancyMP
07-22-2011, 10:11 PM
Becca, I downloaded "en la yola," "escena valencia," "saliendo de bano," "the milkmaid," and "they still say fish is expensive.":wink2:

I'm not showing them here because I downloaded the largest size I could from Art Renewal Center. I will hav ea tough time picking out which one to paint!:D

!becca
07-22-2011, 10:19 PM
Nancy, that is the thing about Sorolla, he painted so many amazing ones. I especially like the milkmaid too. Actually everytime I look at his work I am amazed.

EZ-ED
07-23-2011, 04:51 PM
here's finished ValencaBeach. hopefully it doesn't look quite like snow this time. ez-ed

EZ-ED
07-23-2011, 04:56 PM
here's my crop of Leaving Bath 11x14 ez-ed

!becca
07-23-2011, 04:57 PM
Nice work Ed, You certainly captured the sparkle in the beach scene. Nice color in Leaving the Bath.

purplepansey
07-24-2011, 02:11 PM
Here's my version of Noon at Valencia Beach . It turned out ok but unfortunately it didn't scan well and I dont do photo's very well. If was fun trying to paint one of his paintings and not close but best I can do. Thanks for posting a variety from which to choose :cat: :clap: .
It's an 8 by 10 on stretched canvas in oils of course. :wave:
HELP How can I make this painting better? I want it to be brighter and more colorful. Should I make the brella a brighter yellow, and what about the water? Don't tell me to fix the figures though as they were so hard to do that I don't want to fiddle with them. Appreciate your help and input.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/24-Jul-2011/52562-my_copy_of_sorolla.JPG

!becca
07-24-2011, 02:38 PM
Purple, it looks lovely. If you want more brilliance brighten the water. In the original you nearly need to shade your eyes to look at it.

Marigold
07-25-2011, 01:43 AM
Hello,

came back from the workshop at 9pm and finished this study till 12 pm :) guess I am feeling inspired...

It is wonderful to observe how carefully Sorolla painted the light on the boy's figure: all upward facing planes are painted cooler (pink), only the sidewards facing planes are warm (orange), and those viridian touches of sky and water reflection on the skin are great. Much fun to paint!

Susanne

!becca
07-25-2011, 01:55 AM
Susanne, so glad you are enjoying this...I found much the same when I did my small painting. I was very enlightening. Your painting has wonderful movement in the water.

Marigold
07-25-2011, 07:24 AM
becca, thank you! It is fun painting moving water from a picture but my greatest respect goes out to those painters who capture water out there from life, where it is never still but changes every instant.

I have my eye on another, larger Sorolla and this was meant to be a preparatory study.

purple, I love your interpretation of Valencia beach, you captured the light beautifully and I like how you painted the boy in the foreground. The general color impression is very close to the original I think. I see no need for stronger color - when you look against blindingly bright sunlight, most things have less color not more, but the light/dark contrast is strong. If anything you could add some more warm tones to the water.

Ed, I think your new version of the Valencia beach is much improved... the snow has finally melted :D . I like the umbrella with the fabric folds that you have added. In leaving bath, you did a very nice job with the colors. You may consider reducing the whiteness of her teeth a bit, I find they stand out slightly too much.

Graham, the deep blue of your ocean is wonderful. Yes, the amount of paint needed is frightening: I want to do a larger one, and I will be using up my cheap student grade ultramarines, earths and "cadmium hues" for this. :o

Susanne

purplepansey
07-25-2011, 07:33 AM
Susanne, your painting is wonderful, the water is spectacular, and the figure well what can I say but Sorolla would be most impressed.

Thanks for the input on mine I was not happy with the colors.
I now have to take time and look and study the works of others on this project, look like some wonderful paintings here.

purplepansey
07-25-2011, 07:35 AM
Purple, it looks lovely. If you want more brilliance brighten the water. In the original you nearly need to shade your eyes to look at it.

Thanks Becca will try and make the blues brighter :angel:

!becca
07-25-2011, 09:35 AM
Purple, good luck! I look forward to seeing how it works out for you.

dollardays
07-25-2011, 10:25 PM
I am glad I decided to participate-- Sorolla was an amazing artist. His love for plein air heavily influenced his eyes to see color correctly. I love to paint outside as well so he is my kind of artist. This past weekend I actually painted children playing on the beach and let me tell you-- it is hard! Those kids don't stay still! Maybe he paid his models to pose.

I decided to base my painting on a photo I took at the beach this past weekend. I had to make the little girl bigger and move her to the right side of the picture to make it work. I also adjusted the color to more closely resemble the light and values Sorolla used. I used his painting "The Wounded Foot" as a guide. Below is what I came up with. I messed up in the beginning by using an orangish base- not a good move. I would say go cooler for the underpainting. I was fighting that warm color through the whole painting, trying to make my skin tones look warm enough. Definitely would have been easier with a warm gray base.

Something else I did that has been commented on here before is to vary the color mixtures in the water and on the beach. He used blue orange and I used a violet yellow scheme.

Comments and critique welcome as always. :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Jul-2011/3589-Sorolla-copy.jpg

!becca
07-26-2011, 01:23 AM
Nora, this is fantastic! I love what you have done and how you approached it! I agree it is amazing what he managed to do. Thanks so much for contributing.

Marigold
07-26-2011, 06:58 AM
Hello Nora,

This is a lovely painting! :heart: Your are so creative. You captured the sunlight well, and the color variations are beautiful (Sorolla is a good example of how to use "candy colors" well without creating kitsch). I also like your composition and how you moved close to the kids and the water compared to the photograph, giving us an up-close view.

What is different in your painting than in Sorollas is the water - I like how Sorolla many times uses very directional (diagonal) strokes in the water, giving a lively impression of the rising and falling of the waves. Your strokes are horizontal.

Susanne

purplepansey
07-26-2011, 07:01 AM
Dollardays, I am so impressed with your very own painting in the style of Sorolla, I think he'd be very pleased seeing your work, it is fabulous.

purplepansey
07-26-2011, 09:48 AM
I worked on mine a bit more, hope I improved it some, what do you think?:o

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Jul-2011/52562-My_version_of_a_Sorolla_painting.jpg

!becca
07-26-2011, 10:19 AM
Purple, yes, I think you did!! It is lovely and bright!

purplepansey
07-26-2011, 11:12 AM
Thank you Becca, happy you noticed it brighter. Trying to do one of his paintings is no easy task and feel I know so little after trying it. Fun though.

!becca
07-26-2011, 11:14 AM
Purple, I think his paintings are fun and a great experience to try to recreate.

dollardays
07-26-2011, 12:03 PM
Thanks for looking at my painting you guy., I see what you mean Susanne- although there are no waves at my beach - it is just a small inlet at a lake so I am not sure the directional strokes would do a lot. I hated my bucket so I replaced it with a lime green one that seems to match the general color of my piece a little better. It is a big deviation from my usual colors so I am happy to have tried it. I think I need to try one with a gray underpainting and see how it differs. I think it will be easier. I have lots of pictures from the weekend.

12" x 12" oil on canvas

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Jul-2011/3589-July-at-the-Beach-small.jpg

Graham T
07-26-2011, 06:05 PM
Loads of work to admire here! I particularly liked Nora's work in the style of, Susanne's interpretation (excellent work), and Purple's rendition - the thick paint used for the foam on the wave crests looked especially good. Lovely glittering water...

I got a little more done to my effort in a couple of sessions today. The colours in the original are incredibly intense, more so than I have been able to capture – and this is a very bright and colourful painting for me so far. Sorolla must have been incredibly precise with how and where he laid down each stroke of colour, since they are all very distinct in this picture – nothing has been blended. Incredible technique and he must have been quite amazing to see at work.

!becca
07-26-2011, 06:17 PM
Nora, nice! And I look forward to your next!

Graham, lovely observations, and accurate I would say. You are making nice progress with this.

purplepansey
07-27-2011, 05:55 AM
Graham your doing great and the colors look wonderful. Can't wait to see how it will look at conclusion.

Graham T
07-27-2011, 06:27 AM
Thanks both. Not finding this one at all easy I must say!

Marigold
07-27-2011, 08:38 AM
I think I need to try one with a gray underpainting and see how it differs.

Nora, much nicer bucket!

Why do you want to use a grey underpainting - do you have a source saying that this is what Sorolla did? It would confirm my observations from the study that I did.

purple, I love what you did with the water but I liked the umbrella better in the first version, however you have a very lovely copy you should be proud.

Graham, very interesting to see your approach to this, placing unblended colors next to each other and putting the brightest patches of color first to connect them later.

Susanne

dustonpaper
07-29-2011, 06:59 PM
Sorry if it has already been posted ... I found some bits about Sorolla:

http://www.sorollapaintings.com/sorolla_approach.htm

And some interesting quotes:
http://www.sorollapaintings.com/sorolla_quotes.htm

They have a nice link section on their site:

http://www.sorollapaintings.com/sorolla_links.htm

This one seems pretty good:
http://www.sovek.com/publications/articles/sorolla/

It is so bad that one can find so few personal information about artists of the past. I think especially quotes and anecdotes of their personal lifes, with no obvious relation to painting itself, helps to understand their art better and eventually their technique.

!becca
07-29-2011, 07:12 PM
Dust, it is so true that information is scarce and that all information is useful to understanding. I did post those links earlier, but thank you for posting as they are worth repeating.

dustonpaper
07-29-2011, 07:25 PM
Dust, it is so true that information is scarce and that all information is useful to understanding. I did post those links earlier, but thank you for posting as they are worth repeating.

Oh, sorry for reposting Becca. I should read every post in the thread before I post something :o.

... found some more here:
http://www.oldandsold.com/articles19/art-12.shtml

!becca
07-29-2011, 11:52 PM
Dust, not at all..I meant what I said, it was worth repeating, please don't apologize.

Graham T
07-30-2011, 02:05 PM
Bit of an update, first chance I've had to lift a paintbrush in anger for a few days!

!becca
07-30-2011, 04:29 PM
Graham, glad you have had a chance to paint. You are keeping your colors nice and bright like the original. Nice work!

webLes
07-31-2011, 10:30 PM
Hey guys check this out. Its a link to the Sorolla museum in Madrid and you can really zoom in on the paintings they have there. There is a viewer icon in the top right hand corner of each painting which takes you into the zooming in area. Really excellent detail.

There is also further information about the dimensions of the works and other notes.

I cant work out how to download the really hi res photos, maybe its not possible but its well worth a look. Go check out the Collections link too, I am still trying to find my way round it all, its very exciting!

http://www.spainisculture.com/museos/madrid/museo_sorolla.html?l=en&matchesPerPage=10&searchPage=1#tabbody2

Here is another more direct link to the museum, unfortunately I dont understand Spanish but I am sure there must be some interesting info there for those that do.

http://museosorolla.mcu.es/index.html

Susanne, if you havent gone on holiday yet take a look as your painting is on here. Thanks for your comments on your methods, I'm going to give it a try for my next piece coz you sure can paint!

If you have a program like paintshop Pro or paintshop you can download the pictures . all you have to do is when you have the picture open to where you want or the area you want click Print screen on the keyboard . Then go open your paintshop pro or Paintshop and right click on the screen blank area and choose paste then it opens with high resolution .

Graham T
08-02-2011, 05:26 PM
Calling this one finished now, enjoyed the challenge. It was certainly testing!

!becca
08-02-2011, 05:48 PM
Graham, lovely! You have the movement of the ocean and maintained the lovely color!

dollardays
08-04-2011, 09:47 PM
Graham-- you really captured the spirit of the painting. Very nice!
Susanne: I just now saw your question about the gray underpainting. I struggled with the warmth of the yellow and found it hard to make any of the sunlit mixtures I use feel "warm" because they were going on a color that was already very warm. A cooler gray or even a warmer gray woudl be easier to warm up as it is relatively cool. I should have known better too, because I have done plenty of beach paintings. I have not had time to start another but I do plan to.

purplepansey
08-05-2011, 06:30 PM
Grahm love the colors so vibrant against the cool blues of the water.

dollardays
08-07-2011, 04:11 PM
Here is another one I did this afternoon. I have shown the Sorolla painting I used as a color reference below and the picture I took at the beach that I based the painting on.

Thanks again for putting ths exercise out here Becca. Sorolla is a great artist to study.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Aug-2011/3589-Sand-sisters-howto-small.jpg

!becca
08-07-2011, 04:16 PM
Nora, wonderful work pulling in the colors!!! Sorolla is amazing to study. I really have enjoyed looking into his work and life. Such an inspiration!

I plan to try to use his palette with a slight variation in my next painting. For me this is going to be challenging as I am so used to my usual limited palette. Wish me luck.

dollardays
08-07-2011, 04:56 PM
Thank you, Becca. You'll do fine, I am sure. I didn't use his palette, I just observed what color he used to depict the warmth of the sun (yellow-orange) and how he kept the warmth in the shadows with some red violets. Every one of his paintings is different though and you can tell they were done from life because they're so vibrant. My life paintings are always much more colorful than when I use photos.

!becca
08-07-2011, 05:05 PM
Nora, thanks for your confidence. I am looking forward to giving it a try.

ujwala
08-09-2011, 10:57 AM
Missed this thread until today! i'm a big sorolla fan and a one time mom participant. sorolla has been on my list of artists to copy for a while now. currently on holiday but i'm hoping to do at least a small painting when i'm back home and before the end of the month. great work on this thread so far :clap::clap:. seen a bit of sorolla's work at the museum in nyc... wrote a post which has links to the museum etc..

http://drawtheline.wordpress.com/2010/08/26/see-sorolla-at-the-hispanic-society-of-america/

hope to be back with a painting before the end of the month...

stapeliad
08-09-2011, 11:04 AM
Oh wow!! Thank you for that link...I had no idea that museum was there!! I will have to stop by and see if I can get some pics. :D

!becca
08-09-2011, 12:38 PM
Wow, I didn't know about the museum either...Jessica, I hope you get to go.:D

alvin
08-09-2011, 10:31 PM
I'm a little astonished at how few decided to paint with Sorolla. He is though, a tough act to follow. I thought I'd join in before the month is over. Thanks for picking this artist Becca, I finally made myself paint in oils again, it's been a long time since I last used oil. Here's my attempt, 8x10 on canvas, I really learned a lot from this exercise.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Aug-2011/108953-sorollacopy.jpg

!becca
08-10-2011, 12:19 AM
Alvin, you should paint in oils more often..your painting is beautiful! Sorolla is a tough act to follow. His work is amazing, you have captured it well. Thanks for joining us.

ujwala
08-10-2011, 11:24 AM
jessica/becca - you're welcome : )

alvin - beautifully painted! :clap::clap:

Carey Griffel
08-12-2011, 10:15 PM
What marvelous work has gone on in this project! Really great.

I finally managed to get to mine, which I had been anticipating for some time. :) I really enjoyed it, as I've been meaning to paint a white horse and the combination of values and colors in this was just right up my alley at this time.

I chose to work off of this image:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2011/32203-12.-El-ba__o-del-caballo_01.jpg

But, I don't paint naked people, I edited out the kid and slightly adjusted contrast:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2011/32203-12_sorolla_edit_2_slight_contrast.jpg

I mixed a color trying to approximate cobalt violet, which I only have in watercolor, and did my drawing after I toned my canvas. (Just rubbing on the paint thinly to tone, no solvent or medium used because I do not like the way solvent makes the paint surface feel.)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2011/32203-08-05-11-_0005.jpg

It dried for a week before I got back to it again and, amazingly enough, I did the whole painting in six hours. I had really expected to have to do it in at least two or three sessions. It's been a really long time since I've done anything like this alla prima!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2011/32203-08-12-11-_0071_sm.jpg
(I'm not sure how close this image is going to be compared to my original painting, but best I could do tonight.)

The canvas is 20x30, and I had applied a layer of oil ground, which was so nice to work on.

I would be really interested to hear any responses in regards to the compositions of the two versions...what works better, what might be missing, etc. (I thought of replacing the naked kid, or just clothing him, but I ended up feeling that either would be too much bother when I just wanted to paint the horse and the light.)

~!Carey

!becca
08-13-2011, 12:05 AM
Carey, congrats on your painting, it is beautiful and bright, and I do think it works ok without the boy. It just has a little different meaning I guess. I am impressed that you completed this alla prima, and I love the brilliance you kept! Beautiful.

Carey Griffel
08-13-2011, 09:15 AM
Thank you so much, Becca. :)

~!Carey

TinaC
08-14-2011, 05:02 PM
Some super work here folks, Sorolla sure is a popular choice.

Carey lovely job of the horse. Maybe to balance out the comp without the lad you could have put some space behind the horse, but I feel the same as you thats its largely about capturing the light. IMHO I think Sorolla's placements have a real photograph feel to them, I think there would be more space around his subjects. I may be completely wrong but on the one I've been doing the chopped off hat and scarf seem odd. I'll happily be put right if anyone knows otherwise.

Alvin I absolutely love your version, beautiful colour and light.

Nora I think you have the right idea, interpreting his style into your own comps - I hope to get around to doing something similar. Yours are very successful and inspiring.

Graham, I think I prefer yours to the original! You're doing well to paint with a new baby in the house, I really enjoy your master studies.

Susanne your analysis of your own work and others is always so very useful. Your enjoyment of your own study is

evident in the results.

Nice job purple pansy and a very good job on the figures.

EZ-ED - good work, especially leaving the bath.

Aureliof I've seen yours before and particularly like the colours in the spanish lady.

TinaC
08-14-2011, 05:19 PM
Here's mine so far along with a few WIPS, finally got the canvas completely covered but still got more to do. This is the most complex painting I have ever attempted, just as well I didnt realise that before I started. Its taken an age but I am glad I did the quicky beforehand, it saved me making a few large scale errors with this.

24" x 30"

I photoshopped the original which is practically square to fit on my canvas, I also didnt want it quite as severely cropped at the top.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Aug-2011/117326-Sorrolastudy_1.jpg
I dont like drawing out a painting first but at this size decided I needed to.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Aug-2011/117326-P1030496_1.JPG
Painted everything but the whitest whites which are still bare canvas at this stage
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Aug-2011/117326-P1030517a_1.jpg
Nearly done, the hardest bit was the shaded face which was re-done about 20 times.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Aug-2011/117326-P1030566_1.JPG
I think its hard copying a loose style.

!becca
08-14-2011, 05:23 PM
Tina, you are right, copying loose work is a little more challenging. I think yours is looking very good and I am so glad you decided to use a fairly large canvas. Your sand is wonderful and you are doing beautiful work on the figures. Yay, for all your efforts.

cuyamaca
08-15-2011, 04:38 PM
hi all,

new here! i'm very happy to see the sorolla POM project and paintings. congratulations on the fine work posted.

i just this week ordered "Joaquin Sorolla" by Blanca Pons-sorolla! i know there's a more recent book from a UK publisher but i thought i'd start here. . . and then i visit here and see all these great other online sources, too wonderful!

i have an injured painting hand which is healing , otherwise i would join in. meanwhile i'm spending time online browsing. i'll check those links. thanks, becca for starting - - how long is this open for posting? cheers.

cuyamaca
08-15-2011, 05:06 PM
Great work Susanne, Becca, Ez Ed and Patricia - these are pretty challenging studies eh?

On the subject of photographs as soon I started looking at which painting to study it struck me that a lot of them seemed cropped like modern photos - the edges of the parasols and hats going out of the picture, that sort of thing. . . .

So I thought I would do a quick study, I am entranced with Sorollas bright sunlight scenes so chose this particular one as a study in whites. Its way more complicated than I am used to so I tried not to get hung up on the drawing and just focused on two things, getting the colours and values as close as possible and trying to capture the translucent scarves. I am so pleased I just did a quick study, I learnt loads - mainly how not to do it and I can take that on to the next one!

I am very poor in photoshop but had a stab at doing that paint dropper thing to see where I went wrong compared to the master - just about everywhere.

Next time I would start with the lightest bit and work back from there, I had a huge problem getting the grades of light right. I also think I used too much ochre on the beach. One of things that I discovered was that the sky was all different shades in each part, as was the beach. And the sky through the black/green scarf was a different colour. So I think he painted each section as a jigsaw rather than from back to front (which is what I would do) i.e. paint all the sky, the sea the beach the foreground and then stick all the figures on. And what was that big white shape behind the woman on right - its hard to paint things when you dont know what they are. . . .

I've waffled on too much, all my thoughts just tripping out. Really, I am way out of my depth here. I did enjoy it though.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jul-2011/117326-SorollaBeneathTheCanopy_edited-2_1.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Jul-2011/117326-P1030450_1_edited-1a_1.jpg

hi there, hope you don't mind me bringing this up again but your comments give me much insight. the finished painting of yours is stunning !

sorolla has done the same as j.s. sargent: in some of his paintings of figures in the landscape, sargent cropped like a photo. could it be both were painting a scene & wanted the landscape as context, not emphasizing the portrait/figurative ? i'd like to read more on that.

i like your approach, trying to get to the whites & values. The translucency . . . it's magical. i would do the back to front thing too, so that's an insight right there. good key to understanding.

what i see in the lighter abstract shapes are 2 scarves or wraps which are lit in sunlight, while dresses are in shadow. both women have these lit areas. . . we just don't dress this way any longer but i believe that's what they are. i've noticed the color from print to online can vary a lot. that's my ramble ~
cheers!

!becca
08-15-2011, 05:07 PM
cuyamaca, thanks for visiting, the thread will be open at least until the end of the month and likely the end of Sept. I am so sorry about your painting hand, but am glad it brought you here.

cuyamaca
08-15-2011, 05:12 PM
becca, i appreciate that! i'd love to post something, thanks for the entry info. 'til then, browsing online & typing all lowercase, lol.

TinaC
08-15-2011, 06:07 PM
Hi cuyamaca, thanks for your input on the cropping. I ought to go and look at some of Sargents work more closely, compositions like this are new territory for me and deserve further investigation. Of course what you do get with these crops is a sense of a fleeting moment, and movement. With the wind blown scarves and the strolling women maybe the cropping helps to add to that feeling. Maybe my balancing it out more (on the latest study) makes it more static. There certainly is lots to think about.

Whats that more recent book on Sorolla you know about, I dont see many Sorolla books that dont cost an arm and a leg?

Hope your painting arm gets better soon, but you could always have a go with the other one!

cuyamaca
08-15-2011, 07:28 PM
your last certainly has lots of movement, no worries there! i agree, a capture of a fleeting moment. i was looking at sargent's 'loggia' paintings , c. 1910 when i noticed the cropping & thought about the result of that.

back to sorolla: this is the book i ordered http://www.amazon.com/Joaquin-Sorolla-Blanca-Pons-Sorolla/dp/0856676055 which is around $70 USD.

Here's the ultimate sorolla book which i'll ask for as a gift. it contains paintings i've never seen the images for previously, i swooned when i saw this. the copy i saw had a UK publisher http://www.arc-store.com/joaquimsorolla.html so it should be available to you (?) around $200 USD.

i would call painting with the other hand 'experiments'! i may do some, too.

mtpalms
08-15-2011, 07:49 PM
Welcome to WC, Cuyamaca! I don't have the time to participate, so I lurk in the Matser's threads, always learning something new.

I hadn't noticed the cropping in Sargent's work either, but Sorolla's drives me to distraction. Paintings like this, I would swear he cut it down to fit in a frame or something:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/16/Joaquin_Sorolla_Walk_on_the_Beach.jpg/220px-Joaquin_Sorolla_Walk_on_the_Beach.jpg

cuyamaca
08-15-2011, 08:28 PM
hi marcia & thanks for welcome. personally i don't mind the cropping . i wonder what the feeling is when viewing the full sized painting -that's important. What i see in this small image is more of a concern for the larger shapes, and the negative shapes of background . i'm no art historian but i've taken plenty of art hist. and design classes . . .but i could be all wrong on this too!

!becca
08-15-2011, 11:23 PM
I love Scrolla's paintings and his cropping gives them the look of spontaneity that I think many were. Would love to see his work in person, I think it would surely be breathtaking, just looking at his color plates is that.

As for books, I really like Joaquin Sorolla, the Painter. It is affordable and has lovely plates. Honestly, as for information about the artist, my online sources were the most interesting with the most discussion about his painting style.

!becca
09-01-2011, 08:57 AM
Thank you everyone who participated in this thread. I am such a fan of Sorolla, I certainly will study his work even when this thread is closed.

I know the season and obligations kept some of you from joining in, I had time issues as well. I do hope you still study him and his work and create a copy when you have time.

We did have some beautiful examples of everyone's efforts...thank you again.

stapeliad
09-01-2011, 09:24 AM
Becca, thank you for doing such a wonderful job hosting this project! :heart:

!becca
09-01-2011, 09:27 AM
Jessica, you are so kind, thank you for that.

Trond
09-06-2011, 08:56 PM
what i see in the lighter abstract shapes are 2 scarves or wraps which are lit in sunlight, while dresses are in shadow. both women have these lit areas. . . we just don't dress this way any longer but i believe that's what they are. i've noticed the color from print to online can vary a lot. that's my ramble ~
cheers!

I'm pretty sure one of those shapes is an umbrella well behind the women, which is strongly lit by the sunlight. Take a look at the curved shapes and the strut-like spike. The figures in the background are sitting under it.

oilsnjade
09-07-2011, 01:31 PM
What marvelous work has gone on in this project! Really great.

I finally managed to get to mine, which I had been anticipating for some time. :) I really enjoyed it, as I've been meaning to paint a white horse and the combination of values and colors in this was just right up my alley at this time.

I chose to work off of this image:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2011/32203-12.-El-ba__o-del-caballo_01.jpg

But, I don't paint naked people, I edited out the kid and slightly adjusted contrast:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2011/32203-12_sorolla_edit_2_slight_contrast.jpg

I mixed a color trying to approximate cobalt violet, which I only have in watercolor, and did my drawing after I toned my canvas. (Just rubbing on the paint thinly to tone, no solvent or medium used because I do not like the way solvent makes the paint surface feel.)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2011/32203-08-05-11-_0005.jpg

It dried for a week before I got back to it again and, amazingly enough, I did the whole painting in six hours. I had really expected to have to do it in at least two or three sessions. It's been a really long time since I've done anything like this alla prima!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2011/32203-08-12-11-_0071_sm.jpg
(I'm not sure how close this image is going to be compared to my original painting, but best I could do tonight.)

The canvas is 20x30, and I had applied a layer of oil ground, which was so nice to work on.

I would be really interested to hear any responses in regards to the compositions of the two versions...what works better, what might be missing, etc. (I thought of replacing the naked kid, or just clothing him, but I ended up feeling that either would be too much bother when I just wanted to paint the horse and the light.)

~!Carey
Hi Carey,
I've been following your work on WC and I'm amazed! How beautifully you create! Having owned horses, the only difference I would make after removing the boy would be to also remove the rope and halter. I love love love your painting!

katecarol
09-08-2011, 02:03 AM
If you are ever in NYC visit the Spanish Museum at about 150th and Broadway. They have some beautiful Sorolla paintings.

Twix04
10-20-2011, 12:29 PM
Well, I'm VERY late to this thread, but absolutely loved the vibrancy of these works by Joaquin Sorolla! Stunning, I've never seen work by him I don't believe. And everyone's work here is really great!

I'm infatuated with the Horse at Bath, I will have to try that one! Carey, you did a lovely rendition. Not such a fan of the naked boy, either. I'm sure my husband would not appreciated it :lol: But I love that hat, so maybe I'll try to throw on a pair of beach shorts over his caboose. I'd like to play with the palette knives in this one, too.

I'll be sure to post it here when I get around to working on it. Thank you Becca so much for starting this; that horse painting is not one to be missed. And the size :eek: !!! Mine will be significantly smaller to be sure!

EasternArtDirect
11-14-2011, 02:09 PM
Great job Carey! I'm VERY late to this thread as well! Comparing your horse with Joaquin Sorolla's, the only difference I could find out is that the day in Joaquin Sorolla's painting is sunnier than the day in your artwork. You can realize it from the color of water. But really a great job you've done!