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JayD
12-12-2004, 11:29 PM
Basic 101: Class 8

Light and Shade

Materials: For this class, as I am sure some of you are already doing, you can use the full range of drawing pencils, you may use mechanical pencils or any pencil which will afford you the rich darks that you will need for the project.

Light and dark are the consequence of each other. They play upon one another and co-mingle in a tenuous but mutual existence. They are the perfect example of action and reaction. Light and dark are the things that scary is made of or, more appropriately, mood and atmosphere, ambience and setting. They are the great influencers of emotions, setting the stage for Hamlet-like broodings or the bubbling merriments of Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit.

In a single community project, we will be exploring light and shade.

There are properties to light and shade: There is artificial light that you can control and there is natural light in which light controls you. In our project, which is outdoors, the property is natural light but we have control over the project because it is a photograph frozen in a single moment. For the general discussion and not the project we will be referring to objects lit artificially.

For the time being let us only deal with ONE light source. Light falls on an object and separates into distinct regions—these regions BLEND into one another—this point is very important. The brightest region is the point where the light directly hits the surface of the object and the darkest region is where the light source is least effected by the light source. Simple enough. BETWEEN the two extreme regions of light and dark there exist other regions of varying degrees of light and dark. The region that lies midway between the lightest and darkest region is called the MIDTONE.

When shading an object establish these three regions FIRST then lay in the other regions of varying degrees. MAKE SURE THAT ALL REGIONS BLEND INTO ONE ANOTHER.

When you do a drawing it is a good idea to create a tonal scale so that you have a good grip on how you will proceed with light and shadow. First lets do a simple tonal scale. For this exercise, I am only doing four degrees of shade but you can have as many as you choose. Note that I am only using one pencil—in this case, a 2b—by varying your degree of pressure you can create an entire range of values—again by just using ONE pencil (See Figure 1).





Exercise 1:

Now lets, try the same exercise on a sphere. Draw your sphere and then shade it accordingly. Mentally mark your bright light and your darkest dark and then locate the center value (the mid-tone). Once you have drawn in these values then move on to the lesser values and complete the sphere. Try this exercise also on a cone, cylinder and square.

EDIT
Example with explicit indication of different zones: (by idcrisis55 ,copied from old tread)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Apr-2015/142886-Class8SphereShadowa.jpg

Exercise 2:

Below you will notice a photograph of a tree. I took this shot myself early one morning. Your task is to take this tree and reproduce its texture and its values. I have also, for your convenience, provided a grayscale for you to use as a reference.

Exercise 3: Now that you have conquered the tree, the last step is to put SOMETHING in the tree that means something to you personally—something that will identify this as your tree. It could be a tree house, a person, a cat, a ball, a swing, anything that you so choose.

Good luck and Happy Drawing!!!

[Edit 2015]
"Homework":
Principles (http://www.portrait-artist.org/basics/newbie4.html), Picture with terminology.
Overview (http://www.dueysdrawings.com/shading_tutorial.html) of different shading techniques.
Summary (http://www.tyleralpern.com/handouts.html) of "rules". (Scroll down to chapter "Formula Shading")

Note from the Editor: This thread continues with the recent posts. The older posts can be found in this closed thread:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=236295

Synserina
05-31-2009, 01:08 AM
Hi. Just finished classes 1-5. I decided I really needed shading help, so I figured this should be my next class.:D I've done the first exercise and am posting it now.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-May-2009/187619-classshading0001.jpg

arnoud3272
05-31-2009, 05:41 AM
Charity -
A good start already :thumbsup:.
Here then is my start, a few pointers on how to improve.
-- The quality of the drawing is OK for sketching, for a value study in preparation of a painting or finished drawing. But for a finished drawing it is not smooth enough. For instance, on the cylinder and the cone, on a smooth surface there wil lbe a (gradual but) straight boundary between light and dark.
-- For a convincing 3D shading on a curved surface, one has to show the effect of the reflected light. That is, on the dark side of the object the shadow is again becoming a bit lighter at the edge. See for instance in this thread post #44 (page 3) and #49 (page 4).
For a real live example: this is a photo, but gray-scaled and the contrast a bit cranked up. You see how its own shadow on the ground is reflected as well.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/31-May-2009/142886-sphere-shadow-gray.jpg

You're very dedicated, keep it up :thumbsup:

arnoud3272
06-01-2009, 11:01 AM
I looked up some useful tutorials on shading.
Principles (http://www.portrait-artist.org/basics/newbie4.html), worth while to look to other tutorials on the same site as well.
Overview (http://www.dueysdrawings.com/shading_tutorial.html) of different shading techniques.

Synserina
06-01-2009, 10:21 PM
Arnoud- Thanks so much for those links. They really helped a lot. :D I finished up the tree tonight, but my scanner hates to make it look like it actually does on paper, so I think it's a bit grainier than it looks like on paper.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Jun-2009/187619-tree_resized.jpg

arnoud3272
06-02-2009, 03:26 AM
Charity -
Very nice tree:clap:. Good range of light and dark.
One remark: the texture of the bark is much clearly defined on the trunk in the reference. This is not just the photo, it is an artistic principle, "atmospheric perspective", to let details fade in the distance.
Now the original assignment asks for adding something of your own. A first step in composition and creativity :D.
That said, my position for the advanced classes is that it is up to the pupil to choose whether to continue in the class, or to move on.
You may be proud already of this drawing :thumbsup:.

Synserina
06-02-2009, 09:11 AM
Arnoud- Thanks :D I spent a long time on that tree trying to get it just right..and I'm actually pretty proud of it. I added my own personal touch and added a little detail to the trunk. As usual, my scanner added the grainy bit.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Jun-2009/187619-tree2_resized.jpg

arnoud3272
06-02-2009, 10:39 AM
Charity -
Very well done :thumbsup:.
This is one to frame :clap:.

Synserina
06-02-2009, 10:52 AM
Arnoud- Thanks so much!! :D

wedhatted
06-11-2009, 05:34 PM
Hi Arnoud,

I have done the value and shapes portion of this class, but will probably go and finish the drawing I started for class 7 before I come back and work on the tree in this class.

Concentration is not a strength of mine right now as I lost my mother very suddenly last month. Please bare with me if I seem to jump around a bit. I started the class 7 drawing, but then struggled with what to add as the personal item. The shaded shapes of this lesson didn't require the same type of thought, so seemed like a good place to occupy my hands and mind.

Diane

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Jun-2009/125661-valuescaleSphereCone.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Jun-2009/125661-CubeCyl.jpg

arnoud3272
06-11-2009, 06:45 PM
Diane -
I am sorry to hear about your mother. It is painful to loose a beloved one. My thoughts are with you and your family.

Some pointers about these exercises:
-- the "black" square on the value scale could be a lot darker. Those scales are meant to be used for comparing the values of reference and drawing. And with your darkest value the drawing would certainly look washed out.
-- a recurrent remark: the ellipse on the cone :evil:....
-- the "reflected" light on the sphere is too bright. In theoretical shadow exercises the forms are supposed to be lighted by a single light source. So the reflected light can never be as bright as the direct light. See for instance this tutorial (http://www.tyleralpern.com/handouts.html) (second paragraph).

Feel free to take classes in any order :).

wedhatted
06-30-2009, 06:01 PM
Hi Arnoud,
Sorry it took me so long to get these done.
I have fixed (I hope) the elipse, (there are far too many elipses in this world me thinks:) ), the values and the reflected light on the sphere.
Thanks
Diane
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Jun-2009/125661-valuescaleSphereCone2.jpg

arnoud3272
07-01-2009, 03:36 AM
Diane -
Yes, much better :clap:.

A few pointers for the main assignment of this class: JayD asked us to aim for the most realistic rendering we can achieve (post #34, page 3). Some useful advice is on page 17, post #244; and a sample drawing on how to achieve the bark texture in the foreground parts is on page 25, post # 367
Keep up the good work :thumbsup:.

[Edit: copied image from closed thread]

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/29-Nov-2011/142886-CJ.jpg

wedhatted
07-03-2009, 12:46 PM
Hi Arnoud,
Thanks for directing me to those posts, they are very helpful.

I am posting a start to the tree, I thought it would be a good idea to get some feedback before I get too far into it.
Actually, I am probably going to start over on some better paper, the sketchbook I am using only has 20lb paper in it and I think it's time to upgrade. So feel free to tell me I need to re-do the whole branch.
I am thinking that the bark seems to be too deeply grooved. Perhaps I should transfer the outline then play around on this one doing a couple of branches differently to see what I like best?
I had been afraid of starting the tree because of the level of detail, but I really had fun dong that branch.

Thanks
Diane

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jul-2009/125661-branch.jpg

arnoud3272
07-03-2009, 03:23 PM
Diane -

Your bark texture is really correct, except that the mid tones are missing. Compare with this detail of the same branch.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Jul-2009/142886-corr-bark.jpg

I was tempted to write "again", but then reading about your paper I understand what is going on: 20lbs is much too light :(. For finished drawings I use 100lbs paper, and even that is considered too light by some of the masters in the D&S Forum. Also, choose a renowned brand, a cheap paper will not very well sustain repeated erasure and redrawing without developing "ghosts".

pug307
07-05-2009, 04:37 AM
Arnoud

An interesting comment on the paper weight and quality of paper.

Is there anything in WC about paper that I can look at.

regards

arnoud3272
07-05-2009, 05:34 AM
An interesting comment on the paper weight and quality of paper.

Is there anything in WC about paper that I can look at.

Derek, there is a thread with many links (http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=280018) in the Tips&Tricks subforum.
Cheers

pug307
07-06-2009, 04:13 AM
Thanks Arnoud

wedhatted
07-06-2009, 05:16 PM
Hi Arnoud,
I pick up a new sketch book with 110 lb paper and a few more pencils, softer ones.
Here is my attempt at the tree. It's so interesting looking at it on the screen vs in my book, it look so different. When I compare it to the real drawing, the values seem to be the same, so it's not a scan/photo thing. I am thinking now that it is too light?

Thanks
Diane

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jul-2009/125661-tree4.jpg

arnoud3272
07-06-2009, 06:33 PM
Diane -
Very nice job :clap:.
I don't think it is too light in general. It is possibly not clear from the photo, JayD explained that he took this photo at the foot of the trunk. So we are looking up the tree, that means to the underside of some branches. So some branches are darker than the average. I have tagged with an * some places that are much darker in the reference.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jul-2009/142886-corr-tree4.jpg


Another small point concerns the level of detail. The principle behind linear perspective is "farther away is smaller". But there are other effects of distance, such a less detail, less contrast (more gray) also a lot of color shifts what is not important here. Where I tagged F(ar), your texture is almost as detailed as on the trunk. But observe on the reference how that texture is almost non-existant. This is also a place that reflects more light than the average.
These are only small remarks. Your drawing is outstanding :thumbsup:.
Now to complete the assignment, you are invited to be creative and add something of yourself.

wedhatted
07-07-2009, 12:28 PM
Arnould,

Thanks for the time and effort you put into critiquing the classroom exersizes. I know you do this out of the goodnes of your heart, on your own time. I want to make sure you know that your efforts are appreciated and very helpful.

I have darkened some areas, lightened and hopefuly made a little more vague the far branch, and I have added a tree frog wind chime.

Cheers
Diane

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jul-2009/125661-treefrogSml.jpg

arnoud3272
07-07-2009, 04:51 PM
Diane -
Very nice :clap::clap:.
You may be proud of it.
Keep up the good spirit :thumbsup:
Move on to a next class :music:

wedhatted
07-08-2009, 11:25 AM
Thanks Arnoud!
I am actually proud of it. A rather rare thing as I am often my own worst critic.
Now I have to decide what to take next. It's a harder decision than I would have thought. I am tossing up 10,11,13 and 16. Any thoughts as to which would be best next?

Cheers

arnoud3272
07-08-2009, 03:10 PM
You're welcome, Diane.
The classes that you selected have about the same value. Still live reinforces the principles that you practiced up to now, charcoal is a new medium and introduces some new methods, and a better understanding of drapery/folds is applicable in a lot of drawings.
I can only advice you to follow your personal preference :).

snowfall
08-09-2009, 03:17 PM
Hi

I've just finished classes 1 - 5 and have chosen this class as my next one to tackle.

Here is my value scale

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Aug-2009/142898-lightshade_001.jpg

And here are my shady shapes :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Aug-2009/142898-lightshade_003.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Aug-2009/142898-lightshade_004.jpg

I used a 2B pencil throughout this exercise and for the value scale.

I wasn't sure of the exact shadow shapes for the cone and cylinder so I used the De Reyna book to help me. I've done the cube and sphere before occasionally so that was easier for me, however previously my cube shadows were portrayed differently (ie just a straight shadow from one edge of the cube). I traced an imaginary line down from the top of each object to find the end for each shadow.

Looking forward to your comments.

Thanks

Pam

arnoud3272
08-09-2009, 05:40 PM
Pam (snowfall) -
Your shading is already very good :clap:. But you wrote last time that you were not satisfied. So here are a few pointers.
There are 2 aspects: a. the technique, hence the scale exercise, b. where to shade, practiced first on geometrical forms, supposed to be lighted by a single source.
A. You used a soft pencil throughout. That is the conventional wisdom, and it is perfect if you follow the principle advocated by Henry Moore: "truth to materials": a pencil drawing should look as a pencil drawing. That vision held for most of last century, but recently many graphite artists tend towards what is inaptly called photo-realism. One could blend the individual strokes by "stumping", but that results in a "dead" texture. A better way is to apply several layers with pencils of different hardness. There is some controversy whether to start with the hard or with the soft pencil. Try it out -- I get the best results when going from hard to soft.
B. The "shading formula": direct light, core shadow, reflected light, cast shadow. You know already, but I guess you did it from tutorials, not from your own observation. Most tutorials just copy each other and err on the subject of reflected light. It is most apparent on the sphere.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Aug-2009/142886-lightshade_sphere.jpg

Where could this light come from? It is the underside of the sphere, and it "sees" only its own shadow. Look at this real life picture:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Aug-2009/142886-sphere-shadow-gray.jpg

For the main assignment of this class, have a look at the advice on the previous page, post #559 :)

snowfall
08-12-2009, 11:59 AM
Hi Arnoud

I've had a go at the tree - I'm not sure whether I like it or not. There's a strange blobby bit that's developed on the left hand side and I'm not sure how to turn it into a branch of some sort. Do you have any suggestions for improvements in general?

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2009/142898-tree_001.jpg

Thanks

Pam

arnoud3272
08-12-2009, 03:43 PM
Pam (snowfall) -
I see something strange: the orientation of the reference is landscape, your drawing is in portrait orientation :(, and of course all angles of the branches changed. Also there is some surrealist quality on some of the branches, e.g. those tagged with 1, that look like human limbs with bulging muscles :lol:. Reproducing the forms accurately was not the main purpose of this class, but as a sports instructor of mine used to ask: "Did you choose to do it that way, or did it just happen?"
I read in a previous post that portraiture is one of your interests. In portraiture it is very important to copy all shapes and angles as accurately as possible.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2009/142886-pam-tree_001.jpg


Coming to the main point of this class, observing and rendering the values of light and dark. Branches 2 and 3 should be really dark. Additionally, branch 2 is going from dark to a bit less dark, it does not show dark and light banding. Likewise there is no light band in 4, only a bit of bark texture. And there is a strange light stripe in 5 that obscures the structure of those two branches.
It looks a lot of comments, but the general impression is really very good, these are in fact just little details.
Now to complete the assignment, you are invited to be creative and add something of yourself :).

snowfall
08-16-2009, 06:44 AM
Hi Arnoud

Here's the completed tree. I added my cat, Ebony, just hanging over the branch. She is a super cat - after being hit by a car at the end of March this year, she had to have an eye removed and she is blind in the other one. Together with her fractured jaw and other mouth injuries she was nursed back to health and she made a super fast recovery. She is now back to ruling the household. :cat:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Aug-2009/142898-tree2_002.jpg

Thanks

Pam

arnoud3272
08-16-2009, 08:55 AM
Pam -
Very well done :clap:.
To have punch, it should be darker in places, but I guess that is the photo, as your previous post was darker in general.
A very courageous cat :), but of course still 8 lives before her.
Move on, and keep at it :thumbsup:.

johnb1
08-17-2009, 10:13 AM
Hi

Here is my tonal scale. It was done with a 2B pencil and I think that the darkest tone might not be dark enough. Tomorrow I will buy 4B and 6B pencils and If you think it is a good idea then I will redo the scale.

John

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Aug-2009/159330-IMGa.jpg

arnoud3272
08-17-2009, 01:09 PM
John -
You are right, you went not dark enough. It depends on the paper, but on a smooth or only slightly textured quality paper you should be able to go almost black with a 2B. And yes, it is a good idea to redo the scale for each new medium or paper. Many artists try out a complete gradation grid, for instance this one, posted by "Petdevils". You see that on that particular paper, there is hardly a difference between the darkest 4B and 8B. On a more textured paper, you would have a different effect.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Aug-2009/142886-PetdevilsGradationGrid.jpg

Don't post all your scale practices, but it will pay off to try to get an even, smooth tone, without the kind of banding I see in this post. Another good preparatory exercise is to try gradated scales:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Aug-2009/142886-grad-scale.jpg
And remember: "P&P" / Practice and Patience, this gradation took me at least 5 min.

johnb1
08-18-2009, 08:31 AM
Hi Arnoud

Here is my second attempt at the tonal scale and also a graduated scale. I think the darks are a lot darker this time.

John

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Aug-2009/159330-IMG_0001a.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Aug-2009/159330-IMG_0002a.jpg

arnoud3272
08-18-2009, 08:44 AM
Yes, John, very good :thumbsup:.

johnb1
08-20-2009, 06:46 AM
Hi Arnoud,

Here are my drawings of the shaded shapes.

john

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Aug-2009/159330-IMG_0001a.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Aug-2009/159330-IMG_0002b.jpg

arnoud3272
08-20-2009, 08:47 AM
John -
Well done.
As expected, I have some comments: the ellipses are too pointy :evil: and the sphere is rather an egg, but no worries. A nice even shading, no outlines, very good, carry on :thumbsup:.

johnb1
08-27-2009, 09:51 AM
Hi Arnoud

I have finally managed to draw something that looks like a tree. (I hope)

John


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Aug-2009/159330-IMGbc.jpg

arnoud3272
08-27-2009, 01:41 PM
John -
Good job :clap:.
There is a nice balance of light and dark. An area for improvement is the central - near - part of the trunk. It could gain by being rendered darker, and the bark texture is not convincing. On the branches it is effective because details blot out when farther away. Nearby some more "sculpting" or modeling is needed. The deep crevices follow the "shading formula": light, core shadow, reflected light, cast shadow. See post 367, page 25 for a method to generate it more or less automatically. What also would help is the direction of the strokes in the "underlayer" shading. Your strokes follow the outline of the tree, at an angle of 80 degrees or so. The natural layering as seen in the reference is not so steep, rather about 20 degrees:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Aug-2009/142886-john-tree-detail.jpg

Now to complete the assignment, you are invited to be creative and add something of yourself :).

Elen
08-28-2009, 07:44 AM
Hi, everybody, can I join in ? And if so, what should I start with ?
Thank you !

arnoud3272
08-28-2009, 11:07 AM
Elen -
The short answer is yes, you may join in.
I will PM the long answer, in order to keep this thread on topic :).

johnb1
09-02-2009, 09:17 AM
Hi Arnoud

I tried adding a koala but I now think it looks more like a teddy bear.

John http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Sep-2009/159330-IMG_0003a.jpg

arnoud3272
09-02-2009, 10:43 AM
John -
But anyway, I see the expression that I associate with a koala :lol:.
Well done :clap:.

johnb1
09-03-2009, 03:53 AM
Hi Arnoud

Reading the pdf that seems to be all the exercises for Light & Shade.

Not sure where to go from here. Most of the lessons don't seem to have had any activity for quite some time. Do you Know if tutors are still available for all the lessons?

Still Life might be a reasonable next choice. Do you have any suggestions?

Once again thank you very much for all your help.

John

arnoud3272
09-03-2009, 04:54 AM
John -

Not sure where to go from here. Most of the lessons don't seem to have had any activity for quite some time. Do you Know if tutors are still available for all the lessons?
All classes are kept open. Where the original author is no longer available - some have left WC - the D&S team will replace, c.q. ask a knowledgeable person, even from another forum.

Still Life was traditionally the chosen subject for improving drawing and painting skills. (Cheap models that did not complain when asked to stand still for days on end :lol:)
But you'd best choose the classes on subjects or mediums that interest you most.

Elen
10-02-2009, 10:31 AM
Hi,Arnoud,nice to see you again ! :wave:
Here`s some exercises on shading ( need more practise) and the tree -well,I think,this is as close as I can get to realistic drawing... :D
I would appreciate very much if you could take a look and say what do you think.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Oct-2009/131475-light_and_shade_005.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Oct-2009/131475-light_and_shade_002_a.jpg
Thank you for your time ! :heart:

arnoud3272
10-02-2009, 03:41 PM
Elen -
Nice job :clap:.
A. The value scale is smoothly rendered, and with a good progression. The basic geo forms are also carefully shaded. Two comments on aspects to pay attention to in the future:
-- the drone you definitely heard already: push the darks. The darkest value on your scale exercise is only repeated in a few tiny patches on the geo forms. The cast shadow of the cube looks too faint, I think.
-- this is an artistic formula, you will not very often see it IRL: make the cast shadow at its darkest close to the object and at the front edge, fading out away from the object and from the viewer. That will strengthen the sense of depth.
B. The tree is very good :clap::clap:. The distribution of light and dark is very well observed. You succeeded in a believable bark texture, and very well observed how the texture gets less defined when further away.

NOW you are invited to get creative :), and make (e.g. add something) this drawing more personal.

Elen
10-06-2009, 09:41 AM
Thanks, Arnoud ! :heart:
Well, this was more difficult than drawing the tree... :lol:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Oct-2009/131475-light_and_shade_008.jpg

(That should have been an owl on the tree branch :evil: )
Photo is not good at all, I`m afraid, but this is the best I could do today,sorry !

Thank you for your comments ,they are most helpful! :heart:

arnoud3272
10-06-2009, 10:07 AM
I did not need your comments to recognize the owl :), Elen.
Nice job, see you in one of the next classes :thumbsup:.

Elen
10-10-2009, 06:04 AM
Hi,Arnoud, you are too kind ! :) I thought, I`d better say strait forward what it is,as my owl primarily was a crow,then I changed it into the cat and it ended up as an owl... :lol: :lol: :lol:
I think,I`ll try a still life now.

H2O_Baby
11-01-2009, 11:47 AM
OK Arnaud, here goes with the sphere and levels of darkness pencil meter:


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Nov-2009/56663-101Lesson8_Shading_Sphere.JPG

arnoud3272
11-01-2009, 03:33 PM
Barbara -
The first post in this thread - and consequently also the PDF file - is a bit misleading. It explains the principle by a sketch. But this thread is in fact the first on realistic drawing. As explained a bit later (post # 34 on p.3).
It will pay off to try to get an even, smooth tone, without the kind of banding I see in this post. Another good preparatory exercise is to try gradated scales:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Aug-2009/142886-grad-scale.jpg
And remember: "P&P" / Practice and Patience, this gradation took me at least 5 min.
Work in layers, with a soft grip, don't try to achieve the desired value in one go.
This is important even if you're not interested in a realistic style, the acquired skill will help you in achieving a pleasing "line quality" :).
No need to post more scales.
You understood the principle ("the shading formula") correctly :thumbsup:.
Useful hints how to achieve the bark texture can be found in posts #244 (p. 17, text) and #367 (p. 25, picture)

uneekfish
11-17-2009, 09:06 AM
Been a while... Life keeps getting in the way...
all I did this morning was the tone parts. I generated blocks in software and then did them. I know I coild be closer with a stump, but got the impression that that is not what is wanted... All of my shades look closer on my end than in the photo, ie the light ones...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Nov-2009/198920-lightandshade1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-17-2009, 01:44 PM
uneekfish -
These scales are already very good.
Looking at some of the single strokes sticking out prompts me to the following comments:
-- many are not broader than the captions, did you hold your pencil as in writing? Shading large areas is one of the operations where the underhand position - remember class 1? - is definitely the better way, shading with the side of the lead.
-- work in several layers, very slight pressure in the beginning. All your strokes are horizontal. It is useful to vary the direction of the strokes in the different layers. But the first layer is fixing the texture, so start in a logical and consistent way, which is not always the easiest direction.
Now on blending: there are many ways to blend: stump, tortillon, finger ! caution protect it with tissue or chamois !, piece of leather, etc. Each method has its own effect on the texture. There are two issues with blending:
a. it needs a sound foundation of already well shaded graphite, it is no substitute for sloppy work. It will show!
b. it results in a particular texture which is dull and boring when applied generalized.
You can get a very smooth shading with pencil only - given enough practice :evil: - by varying the pencil grade (hardness) from one layer to the other. Soft on hard, or hard on soft, that is something you have to find out what works best for you and for the paper you use.
Keep up the good work :thumbsup:

uneekfish
11-19-2009, 12:07 AM
Well, here is my version of the tree... Still owe a sphere for sure, anything else??? Not real happy with the bark, no real time, but not sure I could do it if I had time. Not real sure how some of the others did that... I know I had graphite everywhere! Spent as much time erasing as I did drawing, or at least it seemed that way... Seems I lost my kite, again...
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Nov-2009/198920-tree4class.jpg

arnoud3272
11-19-2009, 07:46 AM
uneekfish -
Not real sure how some of the others did that... In the first place more patience :lol:. Probably also more practice.
But it all depends on what you want. This drawing is fine as an illustration, it tells a story, all essential forms are OK. Only the rendering is symbolic, suggesting - not realistic. If you want a realistic rendering, you cannot finish it in a couple of hours, you will need tens of hours.
There are two main principles to pay attention to when trying to render realistically:
1. NO pressure, physically, don't try to achieve the desired value in 1 or 2 strokes, but also emotionally. As a matter of fact, you should envision it only for pictures that appeal to you. (In the following classes you will choose the picture yourself).
2. Draw what you see. :evil: In the introductory classes, it was about the big underlying forms, but it counts also for the smallest differences in value. The trunk should really be much darker. There should be less contrast in the different parts of the bark crevices, etc.
Still owe a sphere for sure, anything else? Not only a sphere, the assignment is to study the "shading formula" on the 4 geo figures cube, cylinder, sphere and cone (last sentence of "exercise 1"). For guidance, look for instance at this tutorial,
(http://newberryworkshop.com/Tutorial/light/light.html)

uneekfish
11-19-2009, 06:58 PM
In some circles I am considered patient, but in many others not... I believe at a 4 way stop, you have the right of way, but that it does not last forever, use it or lose it! :o)

Anyway I have to admit that I was less than inspired by the tree. However one should be able to draw whatever is thrown at one. At least that is where I would like to be. I have no delusions of being great, I just want to be compatant, and do a reasonably go job of rendering an image. I knoww that that is subjective, but for me it is a long way from where I am today. I might revisit the tree drawing and modify it, but if I get time this week-end I would like to try a boat from the WDT...

Here are my geo shapes, drawn from my limited memory, and limited imagination. I did not check any books that would have images of this sort in them, I figured that I have drawn these several times now, I should be able to do something with them. Oh and by the way, you caught me looking at the images in post no# one and not reading the words very well - I see now that is mentions cones and squares cyliders... Ooops!

Oh I see that you can see my tree thru the paper, I have a mighty flash unit!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2009/198920-Geoshapes.jpg

arnoud3272
11-20-2009, 03:48 AM
uneekfish -
Well done.
Two remarks:
-- cylinder and cone: on curved surfaces, the darkest shadow is in most cases a little away from the edges. So definitely when drawing from imagination.
-- spheres: if going for realistic rendering, don't forget to "lose" the outlines. In several places the outline is unnecessarily hard, e.g.:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Nov-2009/142886-Geoshapes-corr.jpg

BTW the form of your spheres is very good :clap:.
I don't think it would be very useful to continue on the tree. It is more rewarding to start a different drawing. And I'd love to see your boat drawing.
Move on to a next class :thumbsup:

andartarius
12-04-2009, 02:19 AM
here is my entry for this one mr professor, trying to catch up all the lesson so im not spending more than 30 minutes on each lessons hope im passing!

Smitty7
01-24-2010, 10:48 PM
Hello, everyone. Long ago, I used to come here a lot. This is my first post in a long time, but I am glad to be back. Please feel free to comment/advise on my pieces here. I have plenty to learn.

470044

470045

arnoud3272
01-25-2010, 05:43 PM
Dave -
Welcome back :).
To start with the second assignment, the forms are very well drawn and your pencil handling is very good, but.. you know what will be the remark, don't you? You've heard it before.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Jan-2010/142886-Smitty-Tree-corr.jpeg

Your darkest darks are a bit lighter than in the grayscaled reference, but that is OK. But there should be more darks. The lack of contrast is the point, it looks as seen through a haze. Also observe how there should be a higher contrast in the bark texture on the trunk - i.e. nearby - than on the branches in the top. Likewise, a better spatial effect is obtained by having sharper detail nearby, farther away can be a bit blurred.
One of the rules of thumb in composition is to give more contrast to the center of interest. Making the branches under the snake as dark or even darker than in the reference would put the snake in focus.

Very often, "drawing what you see" needs some theoretical "formula" to guide you where to look. In the case of shading, the formula for the "form" calls for 5 different tones. You don't see all of them in all instances, but the practice on geometric forms - that is if from imagination - is meant to memorize these, so that you remember to check for them. They are the clearest in the case of spheres.
First determine the lighted and the shadow parts. In the lighted part we find
1. highlight, 2. light.
The other "half" comprises 3. shadow, 4. core shadow aka "terminator", 5. reflected light.
1 is the lightest, 4 is the darkest. Theoretically the terminator lies next to the lighted part. The reflected light is in fact the reflection of the ground, it can comprise the reflection of the object's shadow, see this real life example.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/25-Jan-2010/142886-sphere-shadow-gray.jpg

You did not depict the reflected light, your darkest tone is at the edge. That tends to flatten the object. Furthermore you omitted the "cast" shadow, needed to ground your forms, now they are floating in space.
As I said, this is the formula, not all elements are always present IRL.

You did a good job on this, I look forward to more :thumbsup:.

Smitty7
01-25-2010, 06:32 PM
Awesome advice, Arnoud. I appreciate the time you took to really break it down to the details. I see what you mean about the reflected light and the contrast and detail in the foreground. I really thought I went for it with the darks too. I must be having trouble really getting the layers to build to a real dark. Maybe more than one pencil would help too - hahaha. Not making excuses or anything, but I think my scanner didn't help me out too much with the darks either - the original does not look quite as "gray" and hazy. I will keep my nose to the grind and do better next time. I will work on this and repost. I'm about to go on a business trip, so it may be a while until I get the improvements up.

Again, I really appreciate the advice.

Dave

arnoud3272
01-26-2010, 05:12 AM
Dave -
I think my scanner didn't help me out too much with the darks either - the original does not look quite as "gray" and hazy There are useful tips in this thread Post-production tips: make art look good online! (http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=572823)

Cinnamon2010
02-01-2010, 03:13 PM
I really worked on getting it dark but is still looks light compared to the picture. I scanned it at work and boy did it come out clear! I took your advise and bought a small tripod for my camera so I can send my work from home. Anyway here goes.....:o
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Feb-2010/210164-class_8_Page_1.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Feb-2010/210164-class_8_Page_2.jpg

Smitty7
02-01-2010, 09:43 PM
471028

471029

OK - I deepened the darks on these and added shadows to the shapes. My scanner is still not "representing" as far as I am concerned. The originals do look better. Maybe I should photograph them instead of scanning. Any comments / critiques are welcome and encouraged. Thanks.

arnoud3272
02-02-2010, 06:06 AM
Laurie -
The forms are good, but the general impression is too light. It is not so much that your darkest tones are too light, but there are not enough mid tones. Just one illustration: the crevices in the bark are drawn only in black, as if they were holes, whereas they are really a kind of valley.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Feb-2010/142886-laurie-corr.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Feb-2010/142886-bark.jpg

Useful hints how to achieve the bark texture can be found in posts #244 (p. 17, text) and #367 (p. 25, picture)

You geo forms are very good, just remember push the darks

arnoud3272
02-02-2010, 07:34 AM
Dave -
Very much improved :clap:.
Neither scanning nor photographing represent your work faithfully, albeit in a different way :(. With a bit of experience, "post-processing" can help a lot.
Move on to a next class :thumbsup:.

Samira Humaid
02-04-2010, 04:35 AM
Hello Arnoud,
First of all I want to thank you for all your help :). I must say I found the tree difficult, (I think you'll ask me to do it again) and frankly speaking, rather boring. It was quite a challenge. This time I tried Cretacolour Monolith woodless graphite pencils, 2B, 4B and 8B. This was a good discovery. Since they are woodless, they can be used to cover larger areas quickly when laid flat and used for shading.

arnoud3272
02-04-2010, 07:53 AM
Samira -
You may feel a bit fed up, but your tree is really good :clap:. Graphite is a slow medium for realistic drawing, one should only attempt it on subjects that look really interesting. In the next classes, you are free to choose your reference yourself.
There is still one general remark - you guess already? - push the darks :evil:.
An overall gray impression does not make an interesting picture, look at prize-winning B&W photographs. More contrast in the trunk and the near branches would give more depth.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Feb-2010/142886-samira-tree-corr.jpg

Even on textured paper, you can obtain good darks:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Feb-2010/142886-textured.jpg

A question about the geo forms: what does the shading under the forms meant to depict?
Now, you definitely don't have to redraw the tree. Just add a bit of contrast, and - the last bit of the assignment - a personal note :).

Cinnamon2010
02-04-2010, 08:51 PM
Ok, I darkened it. This is very difficult to do:( I used my #7HB and it seemed to darken pretty well. You would not guess how layers there are...:D
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Feb-2010/210164-Class_8.jpg

arnoud3272
02-05-2010, 10:00 AM
Laurie -
Well done :clap:.
I think this was a very useful exercise. Now you know how to achieve good darks. Even when light tones dominate, an interesting drawing will have some accents with a nice contrasting dark.
Move on to a next class :thumbsup:.

Cinnamon2010
02-05-2010, 12:00 PM
Your a hard task-master, Arnoud:evil: Along with the frustration there is a great sense of accomplishment also. I appreciate the time you invest in helping us (beginners) understand what it is to see the whole picture. Thank you..:thumbsup:

Samira Humaid
02-08-2010, 01:34 AM
Hello Arnoud, I tried 'going darker', and to tell you the truth, it is actually a 'fear of the dark'. I guess it will ease out wth more and more practice. I added a scarf to the tree. About the geo forms : I had placed some wooden blocks on my shiny dining table, with light coming in from the window behind them. The shading was infact the shadows (which looked more like reflections due to the polished surface). Do I need to redo them?

arnoud3272
02-08-2010, 05:50 AM
Samira -
I see you tried very hard. But don't be afraid to "push the darks". I understand you don't want to make the whole drawing darker. Indeed, the aim is not to go from an overall gray picture to an overall dark gray one. The aim is to enhance the contrast, to selectively apply dark accents. Looking at your last drawing, the light parts are definitely dark enough, some might be even a tad lighter. But look how there are more contrasts in the reference.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Feb-2010/142886-Samira-tree-corr.jpg


I thought to see reflections, I asked to be sure that was indeed what you were seeing.
It would be a good exercise to darken some parts of branches a bit more, look carefully where the shadows are in the reference. "Drawing what you see" is now evolving from seeing the correct forms to seeing the differences in shades.
Keep up the good work :thumbsup:.

Samira Humaid
02-18-2010, 04:42 AM
Hi Arnoud,

Many thanks for your kind help:). I tried increasing the contrast by erasing out some lighter areas and darkenning the darker ones. Strangely though, some parts of the tree which had become so dark that they couldnt take any more graphite, also appeared greyish after scanning.

arnoud3272
02-18-2010, 07:36 AM
Samira -
This is outstanding :clap:. Very nice job.
About the scan: almost always, whether scanned or photographed, you will need a bit of "tweaking" in an image manipulation program before it looks more or less as your original.
Please move on :thumbsup:.
Oh well, you did of course :lol:.

qeenbee
02-26-2010, 08:02 AM
hi arnoud, had a little proplem with my camera and I had to scan. I'm also having a little problem with the tree, man oh man. I can;t see a lot of difference when I get it all drawen out, just a lot of smudge marks. :lol: I'm determined to get it. I have to spend three hours at the dentist this :crying: morning. So it ma take me a while. Here is my first bit tho.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Feb-2010/120613-ScannedImage-5.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Feb-2010/120613-ScannedImage-4.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Feb-2010/120613-ScannedImage-3.jpg

arnoud3272
02-26-2010, 09:12 AM
Bobbie -
A good start :).
Something to avoid are the strong outlines where they are not needed. In strict realistic drawing, you will even never draw outlines, they are defined by a sharp change of light intensity. Lines are only drawn when there is a one in RL.
For instance, the edge between top and front planes of the cube is already very clearly defined by the different shades.
You did it very well on the sphere and the cone :clap:.

For the tree: I don't know your ambition, but on page 3, post 34, Jay suggest to go for the most realistic rendering that you are able to achieve. In that case, take your time, accept that you cannot finish in one evening :lol:. Draw what you see. In the introductory classes, it was about the big underlying forms, but it counts also for the smallest differences in value.
Useful hints how to achieve the bark texture can be found in posts #244 (p. 17, text) and #367 (p. 25, picture)
A very useful tool for "pushing the darks" is the value finder. It and its use are described in the "102" class on shading, by coincidence also class 8 (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=372514). I don't see why one should buy one, make one with the same paper and pencils that you use for your drawing.

qeenbee
02-27-2010, 11:10 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Feb-2010/120613-scan0001.jpg


I'm not really happy with this but I guess it will have to do. I have done at least six and still haven't been able to get the shading the way I want it.

arnoud3272
02-28-2010, 08:49 AM
Bobbie -
Six times ! You're very dedicated :). I think that the result would have been more satisfying if you'd planned to take that amount of time for just one. Except for sketching, graphite is not a fast medium.
The main comment is that the individual strokes are rather coarse. That is appropriate for this subject, it is effectively suggesting the bark texture, but for other textures, say for instance metal of glass, a smooth tone is expected.
You observed the general distribution of shades very well :clap:. There is a clear sense of depth with the lower branches in the shadow.
I'm sure you learned a lot with this practice. Move on to a next class :thumbsup:.

m50paul
03-19-2010, 08:06 AM
Here is my attempt at shading... I got dissy with all the branches, almost fell out of the tree.... I still need to add a personal item but figured I put the shading up and get comments :(

arnoud3272
03-19-2010, 06:54 PM
Paul -
That is a good start :clap:.
But for some reason you skipped the essential practice of this class :confused:: the grayscale, and shading the 4 geometrical forms (cube, cylinder, cone, sphere). This class is about shadows, the tree is an application. I strongly advise you to read some theory about the "shading formula" (http://www.portrait-artist.org/basics/newbie4.html), or also here (http://www.anticz.com/drawing1.htm). Here is also a good article explaining different styles (http://www.dueysdrawings.com/shading_tutorial.html) of shading.
Knowing about the different lights and darks, I mean also knowing the jargon, is important for further development. I've seen examples on several forums here where a beginning artist was utterly puzzled by experts' advise how to improve the shading.

Now on the tree: it has nice darks, but there is no variation, everything is almost the same tone. Observe in the reference how the lower branches, in the shadow, are much darker than those higher up. Also how the bark texture is less detailed farther away. That is an example of "aerial perspective".
You did get a good impression of the forms, even if it made you a bit dizzy :lol:.

m50paul
03-19-2010, 09:46 PM
Good points Arnoud, I wouldnt expect less.... Thanks.... I added a house to the tree to accomodate birds... Also inlcuded the forms with the associated shaving..... :smug:

arnoud3272
03-20-2010, 04:21 AM
Paul -
Good improvement on the tree. And the shading exercises are well done also :clap:.
You are now ready to study the specific aspects of different subjects in the next classes :thumbsup:.

m50paul
03-20-2010, 05:50 AM
Thanks for the help!

Tailspin
05-04-2010, 08:22 AM
Hello :)

I decided to get adventurous with the warm up exersizes. I tried the candle without any reference except my imagination. I wanted to see how it would turn out. Asked the wife what she thought before posting and she said "Looks good, but what's that in the middle?".....grrrrr.:rolleyes:
Looking at the upload now I think I should have tried to do the shading on the ground like a sunburst in all directions away from the candle instead of the straight across style I used.
Did the flame itself turn out ok? I was completely lost with where to start on that one, lol.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-May-2010/217014-L8-1.jpg

Tailspin

arnoud3272
05-04-2010, 08:43 AM
Tailspin -
Nice job. Very well done :clap:. Looking forward to your version of the tree :thumbsup:.

Tailspin
05-08-2010, 08:11 AM
Hiya!

Haaaaaaaaaaaa... It seems no matter what I did I couldn't stop that cursed tiger looking like a cartoon character. :crying:
I really wanted to get him done nicely too as animals, figures and fantasy is where I want to go with my drawing eventually.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-May-2010/217014-L8-2.jpg

Looking around the forums and something tells me I won't have to go far to find a good cat tutorial. :lol:

Tailspin

arnoud3272
05-08-2010, 10:21 AM
Tailspin -
Very nice work :clap:. Good balance of darks, and the bark texture is very well rendered :clap:.
A comment of a more general nature: contrast and details diminish in the distance, that is called "aerial perspective". In drawing / painting this effect is often exaggerated. But even on the reference photo you see it clearly on the higher branches, more than in your drawing.
Altogether you did a nice job, move on to a next class :thumbsup:.

Sercei
06-23-2010, 11:35 AM
Here is the first exercise for this class. I started the tree but...it's pretty bad.

Thank you for looking,
Melanie

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/23-Jun-2010/223647-class8reduced.jpg

arnoud3272
06-23-2010, 06:43 PM
Melanie -
Well done, you demonstrated that you understand the principle.
A few pointers to improve:
A. The D&S mantra :lol:: push the darks
make your darkest value really dark; that will give you a larger range of mid tones for modeling
B. When working from imagination, don't extend the highlight up to the edge, ending in a hard outline. That flattens the object.
C. Reflected light is very important to suggest volume on a curved surface. It could be more pronounced on sphere and cylinder. You did it very well on the cone :clap:.
D. The core shadow, between the light "half" and the reflected light, has often an exaggerated dark strip near the light side, the "terminator".
Looking forward to your tree :).

Sercei
06-27-2010, 12:04 PM
Hi Arnoud, hope you are having a great weekend.

I spent some time on my tree these past few days. I actually started it over after reading your notes. My first tree was a big mess with bold outlines on every branch. I could have spent a lot more time on this but to be honest I was just ready to be done with it. Of course, I have just now remembered that I did not personalize it. :eek:

I played around with the bark, but I couldn't get the right feel for it so I just focused on the light and shade.

I also went back and looked at my shapes and have new questions! Can you point me somewhere that will help me with my shadow perspective? I worked on some new spheres (I could have spent another hour on this one) and then when I put my shadow in I couldn't figure out how to place the shadow and how dark to make it. I looked up some info on it on the web, but can't quite figure out my light source. As you can see on the cube, I have lines drawn where I "think" my shadow is supposed to go, but I'm not positive.

Also, on my cube, since it's one point perspective, are all the sides supposed to be the same shade (it looks awfully flat). I suppose if it were 2pp then I would want to have some gradient on all of the sides.

Sorry for the long post. And thanks in advance!
Melanie

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jun-2010/223647-lightandshadesphere.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jun-2010/223647-lightandshadecube.jpg

Sercei
06-27-2010, 12:07 PM
My images will not post.

arnoud3272
06-28-2010, 06:58 AM
Melanie -
Nice job :clap:.
Your practice in obtaining a nice gradient will pay off later :thumbsup:.
Drawing cast shadows from imagination is very tough, but it is beyond the assignments of this class. The aim of these exercises is to learn to recognize these effects when drawing from real life. A few extra pointers:
-- the cast shadows and the form shadows are the result of the same light source(s), so they must look consistent in value and in "quality" (hard or soft edges, slow or fast fading, ...)
-- you can put a gradient on the cube also, one can imagine that there is more reflected light from the environment near the top than down, where it sits in its own (cast) shadow.
But that is independent of the perspective!

You're off to a good start on your tree :clap:.
In particular the general tones and the suggestion of bark texture on the far branches is very good. This reference is a good example of "aerial" perspective. Further away the contrast is less, the details get blurred out - and also, in other media, the colors become cooler. But on the near trunk, more detailed, rougher, texture would enhance it a lot.
It is not really different of what you did on the geo forms, only on a smaller scale and on irregular forms. The bottom of the crevice is in "cast" shadow, higher up we have reflected light and finally light at the top. There is a clear explanation in this thread, page 17, post #244; and a graphical example in steps on page 25, #367.
This is an important exercise, it will help later for e.g. folds (cloths, drapery, also figure and portraiture)
A bit of additional work and you may be proud of your tree :thumbsup:.

Sercei
07-08-2010, 08:18 PM
Here is my tree. I'm not happy with it, I think I'll continue to work on the bark texture. I'm definitely going to get the Hillbery book on textures.

Thank you,
Melanie

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jul-2010/223647-lightshadetreefinal.jpg

arnoud3272
07-09-2010, 11:11 AM
Melanie -
Well done, a good balance of light and shade :clap:.
In the lower part of the trunk, a more realistic bark texture would need an actual drawing of the crevices, not just a suggestive scribbling. But in the higher branches the texture is very successfully suggested.
:thumbsup::wave:.

Maggie_M
08-04-2010, 02:12 AM
I found the tree very interesting to draw. I wasn't happy with what I was drawing when I started but as I continued to add more and more to the drawing it started to look like tree bark.

I've never tried to draw so much texture. I think I may have gotten too much detail in the top branches but I'm not sure.

I'm going to try drawing from some real trees in the yard instead of working from a photo.

arnoud3272
08-04-2010, 09:02 AM
Maggie -
Very well done :clap:.
The shading on the geo forms is very well executed.

I wasn't happy with what I was drawing when I started but as I continued to add more and more to the drawing it started to look like tree bark.
When working in many layers for a realistic rendering, you pass through an "ugly stage" very often :).

I think I may have gotten too much detail in the top branches but I'm not sure.
Yes it is too detailed, both in size of details and in clearness, sharpness. It results in a flat look, you loose the depth. Because there are no receding parallel lines, you cannot count on linear perspective. Depth must come from aerial perspective. Details flatten out further away: coalesce in larger forms, also less value contrast and lighter in general. Still further away you would see only a general texture.
Observe for instance the different depth planes in this photo from the RIL, by Yorky.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/RefLib/data2//30/medium/P9126817.JPG

Keep it up :thumbsup:

silvabl
08-04-2010, 07:39 PM
Hi Arnoud. Before I found the ref pic for the tree in the PDF, I was looking for it throughout the thread. Just when I thought I found it, I read on to realize it was actually your drawing of the tree a couple years back. It's actually good enough to use as the reference. However to keep with the class I got it from the PDF. So here are my color grid, 4 shapes and tree. I just noticed a section on the far left of the cylinder is considerably darker than sections near it.:o

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Aug-2010/230937-IMG_0135.JPG
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/04-Aug-2010/230937-IMG_0134.JPG

Maggie_M
08-05-2010, 02:27 AM
Arnoud,
Thanks for your input. The photo of the houses clearly shows what you described. I was pretty sure my tree had too much detail. It is a pretty flat drawing. I didn't see that until you pointed it out. It just didn't look right to me. I think I "get-it" now.

Thanks Again.

arnoud3272
08-05-2010, 08:08 AM
Brian -
Great job .:clap:
A pointer on cast shadows: because they are caused by the same light, the core and caste shadows should be consistent, same value, same speed of fading out. The cast shadow of the sphere looks too light.
An artistic formula, particularly when drawing from imagination, is to make the cast shadow at its darkest close to the object and at the front edge, fading out away from the object and from the viewer.
:wave:.

silvabl
08-05-2010, 08:22 AM
Thanks Arnoud. I see what you mean with the cast shadow on the sphere. I was thinking opposite; that the shadows of the other three objects were too dark. I'm going to move on to class 10 - still life. See you then.

mindbender
08-18-2010, 07:29 AM
Hi again,
finally have something to post for this class. Here is the first assignment and a first WIP of the second one:

Hope you all had a great summer! :-D

arnoud3272
08-18-2010, 05:52 PM
Hi, Magnus -
Nice to see you again :).
The first exercises, grayscale and geo forms, are well executed. One important remark though, as was said before. For realistic work, don't put heavy outlines around the objects, and definitely not between different planes of the same object. In real life we don't see outlines, we see only changes in value and / or color. We feel outlines, we know that they are there, but the motto of this classroom is draw what you see. And particularly class 8 is about realistic rendering.
I'm confused about the first sketch of the tree, what is your intention with the consistent hatching? If it is meant as a preparatory "value study" the contrast is much too low. If you intent to continue on the same drawing, it will be almost impossible to get a believable bark texture over that hatching.
The tree assignment is twofold:
-- recreate the light-dark pattern
-- render a realistic bark texture; some good advice is (in text) in record #244, p. 17 and graphically illustrated in post #367, p. 25.
Keep up the good work :wave:.

mindbender
08-19-2010, 07:54 AM
Hi Arnaud,
happy to see you too :)

Thanks for all the valuable feedback. Considering the outlines I DID remember you told me so and made sure not to have them - on the contour of the shape that is, completely forgot the interior ones! :o. Will truly try to think about it.

About the tree, this is just a very rough beginning/sketch, the hatching has been done to "block in" the main values (like I do when I draw a pencil sketch and then scan and paint digitally over it). Usually end up with 5-10 WIPs - "Work In Progress" versions before a piece is finished. But to be honest I haven't finished very many pencil drawings - that's one of the many reasons these "Basic 101" classes have been invaluable: They really push me to take my time and work patiently on one single piece. Just what I need! :thumbsup:

So far I have only used a mechanical 0.7 HB (my favorite) for this one. Do you think I should follow the "bark demo" and use my 6B, 4B and 2B pencils as well?

Let me know if you'd like me to start over, otherwise I hope to soon post another WIP of this one. :)

arnoud3272
08-19-2010, 09:24 AM
Magnus -

....
About the tree, this is just a very rough beginning/sketch, the hatching has been done to "block in" the main values (like I do when I draw a pencil sketch and then scan and paint digitally over it)
I guessed so much, but as I said, as a value study it is rather "timid". And the hatching will hamper the finishing. Now of course, the old-fashioned analog of scanning and continuing digitally is tracing the outlines to a new paper on a light table. No fancy tool needed, easily improvised...
....
So far I have only used a mechanical 0.7 HB (my favorite) for this one. Do you think I should follow the "bark demo" and use my 6B, 4B and 2B pencils as well?
The leads of a mechanical pencil have a different composition from "normal" leads and can be used in a larger range of tones. Still, only HB is a bit poor for the deepest darks :(.

mindbender
08-19-2010, 09:53 AM
Sorry for being unclear, didn't mean it as a value study, rather just a way to start marking where the different values should go eventually. (Might add that I'm working from the color photo printed in an A4 size, so this will surely take some time before being even near to finished) :-D

I guess this means I can keep going with HB on this one - and then add deeper blacks for the darkest parts? :-)

arnoud3272
08-19-2010, 10:46 AM
:thumbsup:

mindbender
08-28-2010, 03:23 PM
Hi again, time for an update. :)

Here is WIP2. Still using a 0.7 HB, establishing the darkest parts, will then move on to midtone:


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Aug-2010/186698-TreeLightShadeWIP2.jpg

arnoud3272
08-28-2010, 04:39 PM
Magnus -
Coming along fine. You're very dedicated :thumbsup:.

mindbender
08-29-2010, 01:17 PM
Thanks, I'm glad you think so. Hope to soon have another update posted :-)

mindbender
10-03-2010, 04:56 AM
Hi,
time for an update. Have now worked with HB mechanical and 2B Derwent Graphic for the darker areas.

Next I'm planning to add the "extra" (thinking about placing a small bird on the short branch in the lower left) and to remove help lines/pick out highlights with eraser as well as pay attention to edges.

Anything else I should have in mind as I complete it? :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Oct-2010/186698-TreeLightShadeWIP3.jpg

arnoud3272
10-03-2010, 01:28 PM
Magnus -
This is coming along very well :clap:.
Anything else I should have in mind as I complete it? I would say, remember the D & S mantra: push the darks :D.
I'm not very fanatic about copying a reference faithfully, but observe how your drawing looks rather flat. You rendered the detailed blacks very well, but you forgot the big picture. This photo was shot from below, the trunk and the lower branches are in the shadow, the higher branches catch the light:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Oct-2010/142886-treecolor.jpg

Try to simulate that feeling of the reference :thumbsup:.

mindbender
10-04-2010, 01:23 PM
Yes, I see what you mean. I'll try to create more depth in the image, working more on the darker areas as I continue. Glad you think it's OK so far. Next post will probably be the finished assignment. :-)

mindbender
10-11-2010, 02:11 PM
Hi again,
I believe I'm finally ready to consider this one finished. Added some 6B as well to really push the darks in the end.

Also changed my mind about adding a bird and went for a little squirrel instead:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Oct-2010/186698-OldTree.jpg

arnoud3272
10-11-2010, 04:08 PM
Magnus -
Nice work :clap:.
Added some 6B as well to really push the darks in the end. Yes, you did, and yet -- you are still too timid :evil:.
The reference in B&W and your drawing:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Oct-2010/142886-magnus-Tree-cmp.jpg

The important principle with respect to light and dark (the subject of this class) is not so much about copying the reference as to establish clearly what belongs to the light and what belongs to the dark. And that is not unequivocal everywhere. You have deep dark details, but the general tone is not always defined. Look in particular to the main branch at the front right.
But taken as a whole you achieved a good result :thumbsup:.

mindbender
10-12-2010, 09:34 AM
Thanks, I see what you mean. I guess I should have worked from the B/W version instead, my low-resolution color print was a bit hard to pick correct values from. :-D

Does this mean that you want me to keep pushing darks even more on this one before moving on? (will skip the book report and head for class 10 on Still Life as soon as I find a way down from this wicked tree ;-))

arnoud3272
10-12-2010, 10:16 AM
Magnus -
It's OK to move on. Practice is more important than actual result :). Then in class 10, we encounter the same principles :thumbsup:.

mindbender
10-12-2010, 10:25 AM
I'm happy to hear that. Thanks a lot for another great class. Have learned so much about working with different pencils, rendering texture, interplay between light and shadow etc. Find that I'm beginning to pay attention to subtle value changes in a new ways the more I draw.

Never thought simple value scales could be so fascinating. Thanks a lot - see you soon in class 10! :-D

muvs32
11-06-2010, 01:16 PM
Hello Arnoud , here are some of the shaded objects I have done in preparation of drawing the tree. I suppose I could have taken longer to do these but I will continue to practice. I also am becoming very aware of my difficulty with rendering cast shadows. When I was drawing these yesterday I could not seem to get enough light to actually get a decent shadow to work with. At any rate here is some of my work so far.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Nov-2010/228972-class_8_001-1.jpghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Nov-2010/228972-88_001-1.jpghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Nov-2010/228972-as_001-1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-06-2010, 07:08 PM
Mark -
These are well done in general :clap:. A few points to pay attention to:
-- in exercises in shading (geo forms) a single light is assumed. OK, with some reflected light, which in photo studios would be artificial as well. But it means that for your sphere, the cast shadow would be at the left side only.
-- again on the sphere, it is difficult to imagine what causes the bright patch under the left side, this place is rather as a deep fold in clothing, it will have the darkest shade.
-- the reflected light is weaker than the main light, so its effect on the object can never be as bright as the "other" side. In fact, when studying the shading patterns, the first operation is to decide on the boundary between the "light" and the "dark" side. Then no light patches on the "dark" side can be brighter than any "light" shade, and vice versa. On your cylinder it is not obvious which side has the main light .
-- starting to sound a broken record, ellipses do not have pointed ends :evil:. If you have trouble to avoid it, try to draw them in 4 segments, instead of 2.

The cone is very well done, and its ellipse is correct :thumbsup:
:wave:

muvs32
11-08-2010, 03:00 PM
I have been drawing a few more ellipses and circles to feel more comfortable with darks:evil: I have done the tree sketch which I am posting here just to see what I might be doing wrong. I am going to do another that will be just a tonal study, rather then trying to go for texture. Any ways, this is my work so far.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Nov-2010/228972-tree_001-1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-09-2010, 11:14 AM
Mark -
Very good to make preliminary sketches / tonal studies before tackling the "finished" drawing. Painters do it all the time, and it is really helpful for drawing also. Looking at your sketch, I wonder if you work with your paper flat; it shows the typical elongation due to foreshortening:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Nov-2010/142886-mark-tree-corr.jpg


You can avoid that by keeping your drawing board at an angle of about 45°, or even working at an easel.
Look forward to your next installment :thumbsup:

muvs32
11-09-2010, 04:41 PM
Hello again, here is my attempt to 'push the blacks' I have here a lighter and , a bit darker version of the tree. I think I like the first offering better but the second has a little more texture and tone. By the way Arnoud, I checked out your sculptures and portraits, excellent, love the black stone torsos :wink2:http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Nov-2010/228972-new_tree_001-1.jpghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/09-Nov-2010/228972-darker_tree_001.jpg

arnoud3272
11-10-2010, 04:44 AM
Mark -
Thank you for looking at my sculptures :).
You are dedicated :thumbsup:. I prefer the second sketch, the first looks good but gives a "washed out" impression. You realized a good contrast in each branch, but you could improve the study as a whole by looking at the differences among the branches. The trunk and lower branches are in the shadow, but higher up the light can enter. See in particular the branch running to the top left corner: dark at the bottom, very bright high up.
Do you intend to study the bark texture?
:wave:

muvs32
11-10-2010, 01:34 PM
Thanks for the response Arnoud, I am not greatly pleased with my trees so far. This is the first time I have done a true study of a bare tree, I do trees at times in water color but one can hide some of ones shortcomings in w/c :) I tend to leave my trees abstract in as much as I have not devoted enough time to drawing the bark textures. I am at the moment working out some textures to see if I can improve on them a bit.

muvs32
11-12-2010, 11:46 AM
OK, so my tree is not how I wish it to be but I am just not getting a convincing bark :crying: I do see where I have improved a bit though. The tree, to me, looks more organic and the shading better, if a little exaggerated. I am certain there are defects in this one but it's what I have up until now ;)http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Nov-2010/228972-tree_bark_001-1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-12-2010, 04:03 PM
Mark -
Already a big improvement :thumbsup:.
A little remark to take care of in general: get rid of the - relatively - heavy outline if you want to go realistic. See e.g. the arrows.
Now for the texture: did you check the method explained in the beginning of the tread? Most recent reference to the exact places is on previous page, post #649.
But the main issue is that your heavy strokes are too long and too straight. It is all very well higher up where details get blurred, as the result of "aerial perspective", but particularly on the very near trunk, it is not believable. The texture is squiggly in many places, as A, or interrupted, as C. Moreover if you let run the dark patches together, the lines they form do not run smoothly upwards, see B. Best to look at the original reference, it got a bit hidden by emphasizing it.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Nov-2010/142886-mark-tree-corr-2.jpg

The overall distribution of light and dark succeeded very well :thumbsup:.
:wave:

kswistak
11-13-2010, 08:17 AM
Exercise 1

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Nov-2010/86915-kswistak-c8_1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-13-2010, 02:34 PM
Krzysztof -
Good job :clap:.
There is one point where I see an issue: the very bright rim on the dark side of your first spherical form. Apart from the general principle that all shades of the "dark half" should be darker than the "light half", it is difficult to understand how the deep crevice between the underside of the sphere and the table top can be so bright. I guess you drew it from imagination because the second spherical object, apparently drawn from RL or a photo is very believable. Also observe how in that second instance both light and dark of the table top are reflected on the underside of the sphere. That is logical, isn't it.
:thumbsup:

muvs32
11-13-2010, 05:10 PM
Hey Arnoud, about that reflected light shade on the dark side that many of us have been drawing, many online tutorials speak of a reflected light when shading a sphere. I believe your direction to be correct and the 'other way' incorrect, as in real life, when I look at a ball with one light source throwing a cast shadow, I don't see no stinking light on the dark side:evil:

And to Kswistak , nice smooth shading on the exercise, wish I were that smooth :)

P.S. My fiance' is out for the evening so I will construct yet another tree. :thumbsup: I'm going to study the ref. picture and keep your guidance in mind and pray and sacrifice a rubber chicken before I begin:)

I will be sick of trees by the time I get one to be fairly accurate :eek:

arnoud3272
11-13-2010, 05:28 PM
... many online tutorials speak of a reflected light when shading a sphere. I believe your direction to be correct and the 'other way' incorrect, as in real life, when I look at a ball with one light source throwing a cast shadow, I don't see no stinking light on the dark side:evil:...
Don't misunderstand :). The reflected light could very well be an artistic license, a kind of formula. Extending a dark shadow up to the edge will flatten the plane. If it is flat indeed (rectangular forms) OK, but on curves you'd better let it lighten up a bit to "model" it better. Even if that means that you have to invent reflected light. The point that I stressed is that this reflected light is exactly that, the main light is many times brighter. Rendering the reflection too bright confuses the viewer as to the location of the main light.
:thumbsup:

kswistak
11-15-2010, 04:15 AM
Krzysztof -
Good job :clap:.
There is one point where I see an issue: the very bright rim on the dark side of your first spherical form. Apart from the general principle that all shades of the "dark half" should be darker than the "light half", it is difficult to understand how the deep crevice between the underside of the sphere and the table top can be so bright. I guess you drew it from imagination because the second spherical object, apparently drawn from RL or a photo is very believable. Also observe how in that second instance both light and dark of the table top are reflected on the underside of the sphere. That is logical, isn't it.
:thumbsup:

Yes, the second one is from RL. Thank you for comment.

muvs32
11-15-2010, 05:01 PM
Here is what I am doing so far with my latest tree. I am drawing this one on a piece of Canson, classic cream drawing paper. I am using a General's sketch pencil and a Turquise 6B for shading. Please let me know if I am going in the right direction with this tree. Thanks for taking a look.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Nov-2010/228972-tree_shade_001-1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-16-2010, 02:17 AM
Mark -
:thumbsup:
You're off to a good start. The articulation in the bark shading is much better.
:wave:

muvs32
11-16-2010, 10:31 AM
Well, I think I am almost done with this tree pic. Seems like I am going backwards when trying to fix things now. I am much happier with this one compared with my first couple:) http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Nov-2010/228972-finished_tree_001-1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-16-2010, 12:41 PM
Mark -
I am much happier with this one compared with my first couple And rightly so :thumbsup:. This is a commendable rendition :clap:.
:wave:

muvs32
11-16-2010, 02:32 PM
Quote: And rightly so :thumbsup:. This is a commendable rendition :clap:.
:wave:

Thanks for the comment, it means a lot :) This has been the hardest class for me so far, but also the most useful in many ways because I learned quite a bit and have become more patient and disciplined. I expect some good ol' C&C on my product now...but here it is...my 6th'ed tree :lol:

I could maybe have done more but I am probably lacking in skill at the moment. Even if this tree has accomplished the class goals I will likely revisit this in future , after I have some new tools to throw at it. As always thanks for the help and guidance arnoud.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Nov-2010/228972-done_001-1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-16-2010, 03:32 PM
Mark -
Well done :clap:.
...I will likely revisit this in future , after I have some new tools to throw at it... For a next time, and not just for this tree either, I'd put forward a few advices if you aim at more realism:
-- (red) take more checks on the line drawing - proportions and correct relative positions, correct shapes -- well :evil:, patience indeed, don't rush towards shading.
-- (yellow) more attention to contrasts, some parts on this tree are relatively much darker than you rendered them. Also, don't use the gray scale image exclusively, some contrasting hues are reduced to almost the same gray :(.
-- aim for the exact texture, which is not the same as copying "photographically", but mimic its characteristics. For this tree, the bark in the reference is clearly coarser than your rendering. And as for realism, you don't have to be an expert to recognize many a tree by the texture of its bark.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Nov-2010/142886-mark-final-tree-corr.jpg

Take care :wave:.

muvs32
11-18-2010, 01:42 PM
:wave:Good instruction Arnoud. I have started another drawing of the subject using the color ref. and I definitely can see the difference in tone better. I somewhat wish I were using colored pencil for this, I may try one out in color sometime. :lol: It would give me an excuse to use my water color pencils.

I think my line drawing is much improved and true to the ref. pic, as much as I can probably without tracing. I am still having trouble with getting a good bark texture on the trunk of tree. If I used a vertical bark on trunk it would look more precise but the wrapping trunk is what is at issue in this exorcise, I believe. I think this drawing has interesting lines and tones but not photo realistic:( I am drawing on a U.S. letter size paper comparable to A4 so maybe the scale I'm working is not to my benefit? At any rate here is the latest attempt. I would recognize this as an oak tree myself, but I'm probably biased :smug:http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Nov-2010/228972-class_8_001-1.jpg

arnoud3272
11-19-2010, 03:27 AM
Mark -
Well, you are very dedicated :). It is a lot better, but still a bit too elongated. And you missed the shape here:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/19-Nov-2010/142886-mark-class_8-corr.jpg

as much as I can probably without tracing I understand completely, but why not using a grid. A coarse grid, e.g. cells of 2 in, will help you, force you, to look better at the proportions and shapes. It is a very good learning instrument, after a while you will no longer need it.
I would recognize this as an oak :lol::lol: The tree in the reference is a gumball tree (http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=2996657&postcount=55)

A kind advice: sometimes one should take a break and not continue fighting the same problem :thumbsup:.

muvs32
11-19-2010, 10:44 AM
:lol: I would have sworn that this was an oak tree...but then again, now that I look more, an oak would not have the waves in the trunk bark, least not as pronounced, I guess.

I was indeed thinking about using a grid but I do not have a working printer so I have to use my view from my monitor. That makes it fairly freehand and I admit my desk space at computer is not the best place for drafting :)

So maybe it's time to move on and try something new even though I feel I should be able to produce a better version of the tree.

Oh well, maybe I will do the book report since it will inspire me to read through more of the exercises it contains. The book is 'The Art of Responsive Drawing' and I only read good things about it.

Thanks for the advice Arnoud, I do feel slightly stuck and a bit frustrated.

kswistak
11-26-2010, 04:38 PM
Working on the tree...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Nov-2010/86915-tree_wip_kswistak.jpg

arnoud3272
11-26-2010, 05:24 PM
Krzysztof -
Coming along very well :clap:

LittleBear
12-02-2010, 05:36 PM
I'm planning on getting to this class eventually, so I was lurking in here reading through the posts. But I gotta stop lurking to say WOW, kswistak, your tree looks FANTASTIC so far. :clap: :clap: :clap:

Alex

LittleBear
12-05-2010, 04:41 PM
Here are my studies and value scale. I decided for spheres I would re-do the eggs from class 5. What do you think, Arnoud, did I get a little closer with the proper light and shade this time? :crossfingers:

Alex

arnoud3272
12-06-2010, 03:01 AM
Alex -
Very well done.
Something to guard for in the case of reflected light: it is reflected, so it cannot be as bright as the main lighting. On the second egg, it is a bit too bright IMO.
Keep up the good work :thumbsup:

Yako
12-06-2010, 07:13 AM
Here is an attempt. Tried to draw the tree. It was a difficult. Used 2-b and 3-b pencil. Then i took a picture and ended painting it digitally and added a personal detail....well my personal detail was doing it digitally......:)

LittleBear
12-06-2010, 10:14 AM
I like your original drawing, Kareen! It's so spooky...
No wonder you were inspired to paint in the elements that you did.

Thanks, Arnoud, I will keep that in mind!

Alex :wave:

LittleBear
12-06-2010, 02:24 PM
Hello Class 8! :wave:
I decided to put up a couple of WIP of the tree. Very early stages, but I've found that stopping to scan my drawing in every so often is a great way to get myself to take a metaphorical "step back" and really look at what I've done.

I'm stumped for a personal object in this one. It's such a nice tree, I don't want to mess it up! But I did decide to get rid of the big, straight branch on the right side, though. Didn't care for it compositionally.

These are MUCH lighter in real life, I darkened them a lot so they'd be visible on screen. And I'm using new paper, so it's an adventure! :D

arnoud3272
12-06-2010, 03:35 PM
Kareen -
Entertaining intermezzo in digi :lol:.
But this is a drawing classroom, so let's look at your graphite work. If I remember right you want to improve on values. Now I have no issues with the values on the tree, but an important aspect of this class is the theoretical understanding of the shading formula and its applications. There is a good reason for the assignments of this class to start with the value scale and the shading of geo forms.
Another of your aims is to improve on proportions. It is too late now for this drawing, it is important to check proportions regularly in the line-drawing phase where it is still easy to correct them. Don't forget to check the angles of important lines as well. If I align the reference horizontally, you can see that you drew consistently too narrow.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2010/142886-kareen-tree-corr.jpg

A good help in getting proportions and angles correct is to check the "negative space", for instance that broad gap that I outlined is a lot narrower in the reference.
Nobody said that accurate drawing is easy, it needs a lot of practice, practice and patience :). Well, I'm still struggling with it myself.

arnoud3272
12-06-2010, 03:49 PM
Alex -
Good of you to post intermediate WIP's :thumbsup:. Well, it is the same issue: you draw proportionally too narrow. (If it can console you, I always start by drawing too broadly :evil:.)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Dec-2010/142886-alex-tree-corr.jpg
A good method is to put the reference and a scan together on your PC screen as seen here. You can do that even without Image Manipulation software. A very powerful software method is explained in this tutorial (http://wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2921/521/).
:wave:

LittleBear
12-06-2010, 04:41 PM
You may not believe it, but I actually did put them side by side on the computer screen. It looked good to my eye. :( But my eye was impatient and saw what it wanted to see. Which goes to show how fantastic it is to have someone else looking, so thank you! :thumbsup: Will try again!

LittleBear
12-06-2010, 08:22 PM
Here is my corrected drawing. It's still not exactly like the reference (I overlayed the photo in photoshop) but it's close enough I think. Unless anyone thinks it looks "off"?

Thanks for looking! :)

arnoud3272
12-07-2010, 05:38 AM
Alex -
Well done, it is very close now :thumbsup:.
:wave:

Yako
12-07-2010, 07:13 AM
A good method is to put the reference and a scan together on your PC screen as seen here. You can do that even without Image Manipulation software. A very powerful software method is explained in this tutorial (http://wetcanvas.com/Articles2/2921/521/).
:wave:

Thxs for the tip it's very useful, i'm going to use it!:)

LittleBear
12-07-2010, 10:33 AM
In-progress...

Looking forward to seeing your next shots Kareen & Krzysztof! :cat:

arnoud3272
12-07-2010, 12:32 PM
:thumbsup:

LittleBear
12-07-2010, 01:44 PM
I had the hardest time thinking of something personal to add to the tree. Then my husband suggested carved initials. I definitely think this looks like the kind of tree you'd want to carve!

I think it's finished, although it doesn't quite pop from the page as much as I'd like. Let me know what you think!

arnoud3272
12-07-2010, 02:44 PM
Well done Alex, very nice. You may be proud of it :clap::clap:.
On to the next challenge :thumbsup:.

Yako
12-07-2010, 07:24 PM
In-progress...

Looking forward to seeing your next shots Kareen & Krzysztof! :cat:

You are doing great LittleBear! :clap:

I think i'm going to try drawing this tree again but this time i'm going to do an intermediate step so if there's something to correct i can do it easily.

You are doing great with your tree, it's rich in details....it really looks like a tree...! It's so rich in details! i'll be watching your progress.

LittleBear
12-07-2010, 10:26 PM
Thank you, Kareen! :) :o :)

I think I'm gonna call this one done, I can't add any more twigs, they were driving me crazy! :lol:

Hope to see your intermediate pics soon! :wave:

kswistak
12-13-2010, 02:31 PM
I didn't have time to finish this earlier...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/86915-wc_l8_kswistak.jpg

arnoud3272
12-13-2010, 03:11 PM
Very nicely done, Krzysztof. You may be proud of it :clap::clap:.

LittleBear
12-13-2010, 04:38 PM
Wow, Krzysztof, just wow. :) And your personal touch is so unique! :clap: :clap: :clap:

kswistak
12-14-2010, 05:27 AM
Thank you. I thought it was impossible to finish this drawing... so many details. Anyway, I don't want to see this tree never again :lol:

LittleBear
12-14-2010, 10:11 AM
Anyway, I don't want to see this tree never again :lol:

:lol: I think everybody who drew it agrees. :lol:

newkidontheblock
01-08-2011, 07:41 AM
Hi
I found this quite challenging. Gave it a go, but looking forward to hearing your comments thanks Arnoud.Thanks, Lynhttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jan-2011/500681-8lightdark1.jpg

arnoud3272
01-08-2011, 08:48 AM
Lyn -
Very nice :clap:.
Re: your question about which pencil grade to use.
I see you jumped from H to 3B; that is rather a large jump. There are 2 main directions in drawing: based on lines, or based on tones. The latter is loosely called realistic, because IRL you don't see outlines, only shapes of light and dark. Of course, some shapes are so narrow that you draw them as lines. You are clearly working with tones. Relatively recently, many pencil artists are in favor of highly realistic drawings, where the texture of the paper, and the pencil strokes, are no longer discerned. Sometimes erroneously called "photo-realistic". To get there you need a smooth paper to start with, and then work in many easy layers, and using different grades of pencil on the same area. There is no consensus whether to go from hard to soft or from soft to hard; try what works best for you - I also suspect that it depends on the paper. One very important caveat: this takes time: those artists work 50 hours - and more - on the same drawing.
:wave:

newkidontheblock
01-08-2011, 06:25 PM
Thank you so much Arnoud for your feedback. You do a wonderful job giving your time and energy so willingly to assist all of us. We greatly value your input.
Thanks, Lyn

newkidontheblock
01-08-2011, 06:32 PM
Hello Arnoud. You mentioned in prior threads that the softness of say 6Bs creates smudges quite easily. What grade pencil would you recommend to get the darkness yet doesn't smudge?

Here is my attempt at the tree -with a child's arms added, creating the idea of accepting the invitation to enjoy climbing the wonderful boughs that are on offer. Wouldnt you just love to be a child and have this in your backyard?

Is it too dark?
Thanks, Lynhttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jan-2011/500681-8lightdark2.jpg

arnoud3272
01-09-2011, 03:32 AM
Lyn -
Very well done :clap::clap:.
Graphite will always smudge, of course soft grades more than hard ones. You can obtain deep darks without the softest grades by careful layering, and some intermediate layer with a harder pencil, to kind of burnish the previous layers. Anyway, graphite will never be as black as charcoal or "carbon" pencils.
Please move on to a next class :thumbsup:.

newkidontheblock
01-09-2011, 05:25 AM
Thanks Arnoud, yet again.

iqaluit
01-28-2011, 10:19 AM
Here are some volumes with shading, still working on the tree and hope to post a wip version soon
Thankshttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Jan-2011/216117-geo_tone.jpg

arnoud3272
01-28-2011, 10:55 AM
:thumbsup:

iqaluit
02-02-2011, 01:07 PM
Wanted to post the early outline to make sure the basic proportions are ok.
Plan to post as detail and volume is added. Thanks as alwayshttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Feb-2011/216117-tree_wip.jpg

arnoud3272
02-02-2011, 06:41 PM
iqaluit -
You're already off to a good start :thumbsup:.
Some small points - if you aim at a correct copy:
-- You tend to draw the branches too narrow for their height. Well, that counts for the trunk as well.
-- The angle of the rightmost branch is too steep.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Feb-2011/142886-iqaluit-tree_corr.jpg
Keep up the good work :wave:.

iqaluit
02-06-2011, 06:46 PM
thanks arnoud! I see what you mean about the tall and narrow. I will attempt corrections and add some detail.

iqaluit
02-12-2011, 12:59 PM
My Tree with kite. It took a while and the texture could be more realistic but it feels good to post it finally. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Feb-2011/216117-tree.jpg

arnoud3272
02-12-2011, 03:09 PM
iqaluit -
Very nice :clap::clap:. Good shapes and texture, and you observed the difference in tone between the lower and higher branches :thumbsup:.
Only one remark, kinda "broken record" in the Drawing & Sketching Forum: push the darks :evil:.
I'm not so fanatic that the drawing must have the same shades as the reference, but look how far you could go - still :).

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Feb-2011/142886-iqaluit-tree.jpg
:wave:

iqaluit
02-14-2011, 11:56 AM
Here it is again with a little more push, thanks for all your comments I really do appreciate your time and advicehttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Feb-2011/216117-tree_wc.jpg

arnoud3272
02-14-2011, 12:48 PM
iqaluit -
Yes :thumbsup:, very nice :clap:.
Please move on to a next class :music:

Sandra39
05-23-2011, 11:39 AM
Hello, Arnoud;
Good to see you reviewing this class. I feel I am acquainted with your review writing style so it feels like seeing old friend again.:)

Here are my geo forms with shadows. Not all shadows are correct because I have not studied them all yet.
However, I have done research on the perspective of shadows. I found some useful info. and practiced drawing the shadows several times. Unfortunately, I could do only the box shadows. I have not advanced to learning all other forms yet.

Sandi C.

Sandra39
05-23-2011, 11:41 AM
This is the page I studied from. I also watched lots of YouTube videos.

Will do the Tree next and the gray scale too.

Sandi C.

arnoud3272
05-23-2011, 04:00 PM
Sandi - Wow, you're dedicated :clap:. You did even a detailed study of the cast shadows, normally a subject only touched superficially in this class. Very well done :thumbsup:.
The form shadows on the geo forms are also very well done. A slight remark: to have a good "sculpting" of the forms, make sure that there is a clear distinction between the light "half" and the dark "half". In particular, guard against making the "reflected" light too bright, it should be darker than the darkest tone in the "light half".
Keep up the good work :thumbsup:.

Sandra39
05-27-2011, 11:12 AM
Hi again Aenoud;
I finally getting almost finished with my Tree but will show the WIP first according to protocol.
I primarily used the following pencils: regular pencil No. 2; HB 2;Graphite pencil 6B; General Layout extra black;No. 555 and general Sketch and Wash #588. All of these I have had since you know when. Don't even recall what I did with them before.
I tried to use Charcoal pencils to darken the tree branches but found that Charcoal doesn't do details well so I erase it. I think I need lessons in how to use Charcoals.
I still have some issues with "Pushing the Dark" without obliterating details that I spent time creating. Maybe you can give me some tips. Your help is needed here.
I borrowed the "Squirrel " from the Oil Pastel Challenge October, 2010 by Scarefishcrow. That's when I started to do Oil Pastel but did not paint the Squirrel picture then. I chose him to be here because I like his expression that looks like he got caught doing something that he shouldn't be doing. Just so cute!
Will do the finished one later on.
Your comments are appreciated.

Sandi C.

arnoud3272
05-27-2011, 04:00 PM
Sandi - Very commendable work, it is coming along very nice :clap::clap:. Good range of values and the shades are well observed.
Some comments / tips on the pencils:
Graphite and charcoal don't mix very well. I have no experience with it, but it is said that "carbon" pencils can be used with graphite for very dark tones.
The difference in hardness between HB and 6B is rather large. I'd advice to get some intermediate grades (e.g. B, 2B, 4B), and preferably some harder grades (H, 2H) as well.
6B is very soft, it gives nice tones for sketching, but it sorta "crumbles", which makes it less adapted for fine details. The 2 "General" pencils are not really complementary: "Layout" is also 6B, and the other is a water-soluble graphite pencil, for a completely different style of sketching, a bit like "pen and wash".
Many "photo-realist" artists prefer mechanical pencils. One of the advantages is the different composition of the "lead", mechanically much stronger than the wood encased leads, which gives you a larger range of tones with each grade, and easier to keep a sharp point for details.
:thumbsup:

Sandra39
05-30-2011, 04:05 PM
Hi Arnoud;
Here are my finished version of the "Tree" and the Gray Scale. I like doing the squirrel but the shading on tree is still a struggle to really darken it. Thanks so much for your suggestion of getting more pencils for gradation. I have ordered B,2B. and 4B as I already have 6B; and H, 2H, 4H per your suggestion. Also I am getting two mechanical pens in two sizes. These should complete my drawing set ready for me to go on to other higher classes.
Your help is much appreciated.

Today is Memorial Day, it falls on Monday so that makes a long weekend for U.S. workers here. Since you are residing in Antwerp, you probably do not observe this day unless you are an expat.
Long time ago, I spent two weeks in Bruxxel and remember seeing many old but well-preserved buildings: all the chateaus, mansions, and palaces. One other thing that sprung out in my mind is the wonderful tasty local food that is better than anywhere in Europe, except France.

Hope you are with good friends, enjoying good food and good day.

Sandi C.



Sandi C.

arnoud3272
05-30-2011, 05:06 PM
Sandi - Good job :clap:. The grayscale is well done, very good gradation.
The tree is very well rendered, and I like your version of the squirrel, big fun.
You are ready for one of the next classes :thumbsup:.
Have a nice Memorial Day :).

PS - each country has its own memorial day, different dates, different names.

Magdalena Ladwik
07-06-2011, 03:11 PM
Hello, I started with class 8. This is what I have done so far.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/images/06-Jul-2011/952977-EPSON038.JPG (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/Uploader/upload_image_save2.php#)
I am going to do some more shading exercises soon and outline of tree...again. This is my second attempt and I think I should start from scratch. I don't like it


http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/images/06-Jul-2011/952977-drzewo.JPG (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/Uploader/upload_image_save2.php#)


I hope my third attemp will be better.
Best regards, Magdalena

arnoud3272
07-06-2011, 04:56 PM
Magdalena - Good job :clap:. The grayscale is nicely done and so is the shaded sphere. There are some shading formulas to help in achieving a believable "sculpting" of the forms. The most important is to make a clear distinction (in value) between the family of lights and the family of shades. Reflected light belongs to the shades, and should be darker than the darkest tone of the "lights" family. On your sphere, all tones at the upper right are "lights". I think the reflected light is too strong an accent.
I hope my third attempt will be better. Well, really, the current attempt is not very off :clap:.
The best way to start a drawing is by abstracting all details, get the "envelopes" (in straight lines) correct.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jul-2011/142886-tree-base.jpg

If I superimpose these lines on your sketch, you see that only a few corrections are needed before you can start the detailed contours :thumbsup:.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Jul-2011/142886-drzewo-comp.JPG

Keep up the good work :wave:.

Magdalena Ladwik
07-15-2011, 12:51 PM
Hello Arnoud, thank You for Your answer and instructions (specially about "envelopes"- I love the idea!). I am still reading a theory about light and shade and did some exercises, but I am going to upload it with everything else. There is something I want to ask You, if You do not mind.
1)"Reflected light belongs to the shades, and should be darker than the darkest tone of the "lights" family". So if I have scale of: highlight, light gray, middle gray, shadows, reflected light, does it mean that value of reflected light is the same as value of middle gray (in my understanding middle gray is not lights family, neither darks family?)
2) I tried to find a rules about how to establish relations between reflected light and a subject. How do I know (for example) if in sphere it is along the edge and where finishes?
I know that my questions might be weird but I would be appreciated for Your answer :)
Magdalena:wave:

arnoud3272
07-15-2011, 04:03 PM
Magdalena - These are in fact very pertinent questions :thumbsup:.
.... So if I have scale of: highlight, light gray, middle gray, shadows, reflected light, does it mean that value of reflected light is the same as value of middle gray?
The use of light gray and middle gray is a bit unfortunate. These terms relate to the grayscale reference strip. But for instance in very diffused lighting, the deepest shadow may well be only middle gray. The functional term to look for is the terminator, the boundary between light and shade. Not always discernible, but it shows often as a kinda dark ribbon. Squint to see it better.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Jul-2011/142886-apples-terminator.gif

... I tried to find a rules about how to establish relations between reflected light and a subject. How do I know (for example) if in sphere it is along the edge and where finishes?
Reflected light is independent of the object itself, it is the reflection of light by the surroundings. So, particularly in specific arrangements for the study of light, it can invade very far into the territory of the shade :lol:. And also, contrary to the "formula", it can be relatively bright IF there is a clear cause for it. E.g. almost touching another very bright object:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Jul-2011/37195-Milkglass_Bowl_with_Eggs_-_SweetBabyJ.jpg

But in more natural scenes, it will be rather dim, as in the picture of the apples above.
:wave:

maisygrrl
07-27-2011, 09:47 AM
My first few exercises... I don't have the best photos today, unfortunately. The spheres seem to have lost their highlights, and some of the dark tones are a little washed out (particularly on the tomato -- I know it wasn't part of the assignment, but that tomato was just cute as a button and I couldn't resist :) )


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jul-2011/968565-2011-07-26-geometric1-resized.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jul-2011/968565-2011-07-26-geometric2-resized.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/27-Jul-2011/968565-2011-07-24-tomato-resized.jpg

arnoud3272
07-27-2011, 10:33 AM
Daisy - Nicely done :clap:.
Keep up the good work :thumbsup:.

maisygrrl
08-04-2011, 03:31 PM
A couple of WIP photos... As always, thank you for your feedback :)

I ended up transferring my original sketch, then changing a bunch of lines on the tracing paper when I realized how far off they were and transferring again. They're still not perfect, but I decided to just get on with it. Hopefully nothing's too far off.

In the second one, that branch I'm working on isn't done, but any advice as to whether it looks like I'm going about it in a reasonable way is appreciated. I'm struggling some with showing the texture.

(Hmm, the uploader isn't working for me today. Trying to attach them instead.)

arnoud3272
08-04-2011, 04:16 PM
Daisy - Well done. The line drawing is accurate enough for this kind of subject. Only for portraits - human or pet animals - you would need an extra effort.
The texture is very well executed. Remember to render it with less details and not so clearly defined on the far branches. That will help to give depth to the drawing (so-called aerial perspective).
the uploader isn't working for me today. Trying to attach them instead You're lucky, for many members the attachment facility is broken as well!
:wave:

Magdalena Ladwik
08-09-2011, 09:51 AM
Hello Arnoud! Thank You so much for Your answer (it really helped me to find out more about reflected light).
This is my class 8 assignment (finally...). Could You review it, please?
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/images/09-Aug-2011/952977-polowa.JPG (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/Uploader/upload_image_save2.php#)
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/images/09-Aug-2011/952977-shadow_vp.JPG (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/Uploader/upload_image_save2.php#)
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/images/09-Aug-2011/952977-bry322;y.JPG (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/Uploader/upload_image_save2.php#)
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/images/09-Aug-2011/952977-tree.JPG (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/../Community/Uploader/upload_image_save2.php#)

Thank You
Magdalena

arnoud3272
08-09-2011, 01:06 PM
Excellent work Magdalena :clap:. You may be proud of what you achieved.

Magdalena Ladwik
08-09-2011, 04:56 PM
Excellent work Magdalena :clap:. You may be proud of what you achieved. :D wow I am delighted! Your comment really motivates me. Can I move on and join to next class, please?

arnoud3272
08-09-2011, 05:12 PM
Can I move on and join to next class, please? No doubt :thumbsup:.

Magdalena Ladwik
08-10-2011, 02:41 AM
No doubt :thumbsup:. That's great, thank You! So can't wait to start new class. I decided that I am not going to do class 9 (Book Report and Project Assignment), because there is report of "my" book (Betty Edwards "Drawing on the right side of the brain"), so I am going just to read it.

Arnoud I saw Your drawing of tree in pencil (I mean class 8 assignment tree) and it is really amazing. May I ask You, for how long have You been practicing to achieve this level?

arnoud3272
08-10-2011, 08:34 AM
... May I ask You, for how long have You been practicing to achieve this level? Well, no straight answer here... I did it after about six months of systematic practice, but I've been drawing " a bit" all my life.
:wave:

ArtbyPeggy
10-16-2011, 12:53 AM
Hi Arnoud :wave:
I finally found some time to do this class :)
Attached are my first assignment for your review.
Thank you for the time you spend teaching these classes :cat:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Oct-2011/977655-class101-8014.jpg

arnoud3272
10-16-2011, 04:20 AM
Peggy - Well done :clap:. Good job so far :thumbsup:.

ArtbyPeggy
10-17-2011, 12:59 PM
Here is my progress on the tree so far.
I darkened the contrast to show up the sketch at this point.
I actually tried the Grid method for the first time and it went OK I guess. Not sure I like all the extra lines though!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Oct-2011/977655-class101-8017.jpg

arnoud3272
10-17-2011, 03:48 PM
Peggy - Good job so far :thumbsup:.
Not sure I like all the extra lines though! Well, gridding (aka graphing) is a valuable method to draw an accurate copy. The disadvantage is indeed that all the lines must be erased, or blended-in in the shading. There is a "modulating" variant, dense in important or very detailed areas, parse in general.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Oct-2011/142886-grid.gif
(Much too coarse, but the animating software refused to see thin lines.)

Keep up the good work :).

ArtbyPeggy
10-22-2011, 10:25 PM
That is an interesting style Arnoud. I wanted to check in and let you know I'm still working on the tree. Here is what I have so far.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Oct-2011/977655-class101-4.jpg

arnoud3272
10-23-2011, 04:24 AM
You're off to a good start, Peggy :thumbsup:.

ArtbyPeggy
11-06-2011, 02:25 PM
Thank you Arnoud :)
Posting another update.
C&C's welcome :)

Thanks!
Peggy

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Nov-2011/977655-class101_8-005.jpg

arnoud3272
11-06-2011, 02:38 PM
Good job, Peggy :clap:, very nice already.

ArtbyPeggy
11-10-2011, 11:30 PM
Hi Arnoud,
Attached is my "final" unless you deem differently :)
I will await your C&C :crossfingers:
Thank you for the time you spend running these classes! They are interesting an most of the time fun. Not sure I will be drawing anymore trees in the near future though :lol:
Peggy


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Nov-2011/977655-Class101_8-008.jpg

arnoud3272
11-11-2011, 05:00 AM
Very well done, Peggy :clap::clap:. You may be proud of it. I like the vignette design.
Please move on to a next class :thumbsup:.

ArtbyPeggy
11-11-2011, 01:22 PM
Thanks Arnoud!
:clap:

latedrawer
11-27-2011, 05:11 PM
Your class assignments challenged me to really think about the different factors that affect stroke. I have 5 different pencil sets and I decided to experiment to see which brand would work best for Exercise 2. I also tried to use the overhand stroke, which I found very difficult for me to control--probably because of nerve damage in my wrists. Anyway, I made tonal scales for different brands. Then I tried a different brand on each form. I'm posting some of the results. I understand now the value of having notes along side drawings to help me make judgments in the future.

I also drew from forms set up in a still life box. Since these are wood or colored, dense foam rubber, I had difficulty "seeing" a fine tonal gradation with the light source I used. I could definitely identify more tones than when the forms were simply set on a table with the same lamp.

So I have two questions about quality practice to develop skill in identifying tones. First, is it a good practice technique to use real geometric forms for exploring the effects of light and shade? Second, should I always lay down a foundation layer with a hard pencil before I use the softer leads?

If you want me to do the forms with just one pencil brand, let me know and I'll redo them and post the results.

Thanks so much for prodding all of us to improve!
Carole

694526

694527

694528

arnoud3272
11-28-2011, 04:34 AM
Carole - You're very dedicated :clap:.
Working from real life, not from photos, is very good practice :thumbsup:.
Two comments:
-- your range of darks stops too early. It is very well graded, but you loose room to render all the mid tones. Use many layers to darken more; in some layers search for the white flecks and fill them in specifically.
-- has your still life box black walls? That would explain that you don't see the reflected light, except indeed in your drawing of the ball. In a more natural environment the darkest shadow on a curved form is not at the edge.
Search for this core shadow in your practice.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Nov-2011/142886-apples-terminator.gif

Keep up the good work :thumbsup:

latedrawer
11-28-2011, 11:19 AM
Again, thanks for pushing me. I don't apply enough pressure because I'm afraid of damaging the paper and leaving indentations if I erase. So I'll go over my drawings to get darker tones. I'll use page 48 of DeReyna as a reference for placing the core and reflected light. Then I'll post them again.

I'm using an ordinary, brown cardboard box. Would it help to paint the inside white or grey if I want to explore reflected light? Should I paint my wooden blocks white or grey?
Carole

arnoud3272
11-28-2011, 05:44 PM
....
I'm using an ordinary, brown cardboard box. Would it help to paint the inside white or grey if I want to explore reflected light? Should I paint my wooden blocks white or grey?
Carole Carole, the basic shadowbox is matt white (a good choice is acrylic gesso). Any not too dark color would be fine for the objects, again not glossy. The texture of the objects should be smooth.
The type (concentrated: hard shadows, or diffused) and intensity of the lighting play an important role as well.
:thumbsup:

maisygrrl
11-28-2011, 07:52 PM
I had sort of a crisis of confidence partway through this drawing and between that and being busy with work and school ended up putting it aside for a while. I've started working on it again and thought I'd post a WIP photo to see if you had any feedback or think I'm going wrong anywhere. (Apologies for the glare in the photo! It's been raining for days so couldn't manage to get decent lighting.)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Nov-2011/968565-2011-11-28-tree-wip-resized.jpg

latedrawer
11-29-2011, 01:09 AM
Arnoud, thank you for the information about still life boxes.
I corrected the four forms to include reflected light and darker tones. The scanned images don't show the darkest tones very well, but they do give some indication of my attempt:crossfingers::crossfingers:
694564
694566

This is my contour drawing with some indications of the directions of the limbs. Any comments would be appreciated.
Carole
694565

arnoud3272
11-29-2011, 10:39 AM
Daisy - You're off to a good start :thumbsup:.
I'd put a bit more ragged edges to the darkest patches, they look too clean for bark crevices.
Otherwise you're doing very well.

arnoud3272
11-29-2011, 10:41 AM
Carole - Well done :clap:. The shading on the geo forms is very well rendered. Nice effect.
The line drawing is a good foundation for further work :thumbsup:.

latedrawer
11-29-2011, 05:33 PM
This photo reference certainly offers many opportunities to explore texture, angles, viewpoint and shading!

I made a judgment call to interpret the first limb from a ground viewpoint as jutting upwards towards me, with the limb behind it angling away some.

As I draw, I feel a sense of hugging the tree and leaning back as I look up. Even so, I had difficulty "reading" some parts of the image, so I plan on leaving out branches I don't understand. I found I had to make adjustments as I "feel" my way up the tree, focusing on texture and mass. Any comments on my WIP are welcome! Thanks, Carole
694577

arnoud3272
11-29-2011, 05:40 PM
Carole - If it can help your interpretation, somewhere in the (now closed) starting thread, the photographer explained that he took the photo standing at the base of the tree, pointing upwards along the trunk :thumbsup:.

latedrawer
11-30-2011, 06:03 PM
Greetings Arnoud....I now understand why people have strong memories of doing this tree! I hope this level of drawing is acceptable for this class. My personal touch is a nuthatch. We have them on trees around our house most of the year and they're a lot of fun to watch.

If you say make the darks darker, I'm not sure what I'll do:D Seriously, I would have difficulty shading it much more because the reference photo is difficult for me to read. I found that if I shifted between my "reading" glasses and my "computer" glasses, I could work on the details easier. But I'm not familiar with this kind of tree and the photo seems to have distorted this grand old tree IMHO (which means, I think, "in my humble opinion").

In spite of the challenges, I really learned a lot about thinking about the direction of light and how it would create shadows in the tree. It was interesting to try to think about the shadows in the crevices and the patterns of light on the bark.

I haven't been printing out the reference photos on paper meant specifically for photographs. Would it be worthwhile to do so in the future?
As always, thanks for your coaching!
Carole
694594

arnoud3272
12-01-2011, 09:16 AM
Carole - Good job so far :clap:.
If you say make the darks darker, I'm not sure what I'll do Yes, there is not enough contrast, it is like an old washed out B&W photo.
No problem of seeing the details, the details are very well captured. The problem is the big shapes. If you squint your eyes, simulated here by blurring and posterizing, you see that the general tone of several branches should be a lot darker.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/01-Dec-2011/142886-carole-tree-corr.jpg

But the texture is very well rendered :thumbsup:.

latedrawer
12-01-2011, 10:50 AM
Shucks, but I really understand what you mean with the side by side toned pictures. Thanks so much. I'll have to experiment to find which pencil brand will work with Prismacolor since I only have through 4B. I'm also going to try working some without my glasses--that might be the same as squinting:lol:
Carole

latedrawer
12-01-2011, 11:26 PM
Greetings Arnoud! Here's my tree drawing darkened with soft Faber Castell pencils. I tried to keep the texture as I worked, but wasn't always successful, especially on the front-most limb where I used 8B. I did end up with some scoring lines from pressing to hard, even though I tried to control my stroke. I did layer again because that seemed to be the only way I could maintain some illusion of texture.

I really thought about the comparative values as I added more layers. As I worked through the drawing, I used your tonal images along with the reference picture. I also had my scanned image on the monitor. All this helped me to compare different areas of the drawing and try to capture the same tone where values were the same.

I corrected some angles and took out most of the small branches. I don't think I know enough to put that amount of detail in this picture.

Many parts of the drawing are now shiny, but I don't want to spray with a fixative until I get your input.

Thanks, Carole
694624

arnoud3272
12-02-2011, 05:24 AM
Very well done, Carole. Excellent result :clap::clap:. If you put it away a few days and look again, you will be proud of it :thumbsup:.
Graphite is shiny, that is its nature, no need to hide it. "truth to material" (Henry Moore).
See you in a next class :).

LindaGal
02-12-2012, 12:32 AM
some shading and my first attempt at teh tree. Will leave it for a while and come back to see what i can do. (Just used 2B, 6B, 3H HB pencilshttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Feb-2012/974162-tree.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Feb-2012/974162-shade.jpg

arnoud3272
02-12-2012, 07:12 AM
Linda - Very nice work :clap::clap:.
Contrast on the tree is stronger than you'd expect IRL. Nothing wrong with stylizing, but it reminds me of a saying by a sports instructor of mine: "Did you choose it that way, or was it just happening?" :lol:
Likewise, it is important to look for reflected light when shading. It is a little formulaic, but if you observe carefully, you will see that it is extremely common. It means also that curved planes will almost never have the darkest dark at the edges.
The gradation in the shading exercises is very good.
Please move on :thumbsup:.

LindaGal
02-13-2012, 05:06 AM
Some of the contrast seemed to happen with the jpg - I did an auto correct - but perhaps should have used gimp and a little more with the 4B pencil! Think i have had enough of the tree! will be back to next lesson when I get a chance. Thanks Arnoud

Felisa
03-02-2012, 11:09 AM
Hi Arnoud, my work for this class. It should be called "nightmare tree" I disliked it before I started drawinghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Mar-2012/122109-shadows.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Mar-2012/122109-Tree.jpg .:) Thank you for your comments.

arnoud3272
03-02-2012, 05:24 PM
Elisa - I think the tree is very well done, congratulations :clap:.
But the shading exercises are a very important part of this class:
-- the "grayscale" is rather asymmetric, the middle value should - logically - lie a bit halfway white and black. Translated to a scale of 0 to 10, your values are more 0, 1, 2, 3, 10. If you look in a museum at working drawings of important painters, you'll find often a grayscale somewhere in the margin, as a reference to help to record the correct value relations. This is not a trivial exercise, it is one of the foundations of realistic art.
Apart from this weak point, you did a good job, please move on to a next class :thumbsup:

Felisa
03-05-2012, 01:13 PM
Elisa - I think the tree is very well done, congratulations :clap:.
But the shading exercises are a very important part of this class:
-- the "grayscale" is rather asymmetric, the middle value should - logically - lie a bit halfway white and black. Translated to a scale of 0 to 10, your values are more 0, 1, 2, 3, 10. If you look in a museum at working drawings of important painters, you'll find often a grayscale somewhere in the margin, as a reference to help to record the correct value relations. This is not a trivial exercise, it is one of the foundations of realistic art.
Apart from this weak point, you did a good job, please move on to a next class :thumbsup:

I never thought it was a trivial exercise (I only meant about the tree).
I am working again in the grayscale and repost it. Though the concept is easy enough the practice is really difficult and no doubt one of my serious problems in painting.

By the way though I have been to many museums I have never seen the grayscale you mention which proves that attention is selective.:o In the future I will pay more attention. Have you got any link so that I could have a look_?

I skipped lesson no. ten as I do not have the time to read and resume a book now. I hope it is all right.

As always thank you for your help, it is invaluable.

mayana
03-17-2012, 05:55 AM
Hello Arnoud,
Here is my first assignment, the second one the tree, will try! scary me though!:(
Have a nice WE!!!:wave:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Mar-2012/164039-lightnshade.jpeg

arnoud3272
03-17-2012, 06:13 AM
mayana - Very well done :clap::clap:.

mayana
03-20-2012, 08:57 PM
Hello Arnoud,
Took me looongtime to finish this tree. I wonder why on earth man can be more patience than woman (in drawing of course!!!) credit for that :thumbsup:

I learned a lot from this tree, hope will make me easier to tackle next drawing:smug:

Thank you for critics!:heart:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2012/164039-treex.jpeg

arnoud3272
03-21-2012, 02:04 PM
Well done ,mayana :clap::clap:. I like it.

ricksherny
07-07-2012, 11:15 PM
It took me several days and three practice trees to finally feel comfortable enough to attempt the tree. I moved up to a 8.5" x 11" pad of 50 lb paper rather than the 5" x 7" sketch pad I have been using. The one thing I did not realize when I bought this pad is that it is a fine tooth surface.
I had a lot of fun on this project and learned a lot about layering and being patient while I bring the tones out. I hope you like them.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jul-2012/1072372-shading.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Jul-2012/1072372-treedcat.jpg
Sadly I had to reduce this down to 55% quality. I originally scanned this in at 600dpi. I hope is shows up well.

arnoud3272
07-08-2012, 04:52 AM
ricksherny - You worked hard :thumbsup:.
The shading exercises on the geo forms are well done :clap:.
I have two remarks on the tree.
-- the general proportions are off: the trunk is too long, and its angle deviates a lot from the reference; all branches, and the trunk, are not wide enough for their length.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/08-Jul-2012/142886-rick-tree-1.jpg

-- as for the bark texture, the crevices on the trunk do not run all in the same direction; many are also shorter while you drew them mostly the same length. Of course we don't copy the crevices exactly, but to correctly suggest the texture, there should be some variety in the strokes.

But the shading on the tree is basically correct :thumbsup:.

ricksherny
07-08-2012, 10:35 AM
I see what you mean there about the proportion of the trunk and limbs. I am thinking about going back and working on classes 1 - 4 again just to get more practice in proportion.

Arnoud, I really want to thank you for your advice and help. Although I have a long way to go, you have helped me get to this point and I am sure I will continue to improve. Thank you again! :thumbsup:

meganj
08-10-2012, 12:35 PM
Good morning Arnaud! Here is the first part of the exercise. I pulled out every drawing pencil I could find. I played with circular shading, cross hatching, a little bit of tortillion for blending too. Only thing I didn't use was charcoal. I was trying to figure out the angles and such in my head rather than following someone else's drawing, and that was hard; when and when not to use reflected light for instance.


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Aug-2012/67498-108_LightShade.jpg

arnoud3272
08-10-2012, 03:02 PM
Megan - Well done, good progression in darks :clap:.
I was trying to figure out the angles and such in my head rather than following someone else's drawing My advice - and not only mine, definitely - would be to do neither, study shadows from real life. Then you would see that there is no light, reflected or otherwise, at the very bottom of the sphere. It acts as a deep crevice:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/10-Aug-2012/142886-sphere-shadow.jpg

Also, take care to identify the light and dark "halves". Reflected light belongs to the shadow side, it is less bright than any shade on the light side. There can be exceptions, but they are only believable if it is clear what nearby object is strongly reflecting.
Keep up^the good work :thumbsup:.

meganj
08-11-2012, 03:11 AM
Here is the other half of the assignment. Thank you!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/11-Aug-2012/67498-108_tree.jpg

arnoud3272
08-11-2012, 05:05 PM
Nicely drawn, Megan :clap:.
The darks and the bark texture on the branches are well done. That is, the specific learning of this class is achieved.
I see some room for improvement on a more general aspect, I miss a certain balance in the details. The branches are very detailed, whereas the trunk is rendered in little more than a sketchy cross hatching. IMO, the trunk is the focal point, both by its position (vertically central, horizontally on a third) and by the radiating branches. The centrifugal force of the branches causes a centripetal force drawing the attention in to the center.
Moreover, the trunk being nearest to us, shows the most obvious bark texture.
:wave:

meganj
08-12-2012, 02:18 AM
I started to get bored with the trunk. 2.5 hours and I was ready to stop. I should have and come back to it later. My bad, and I apologize. I will put more work into the trunk. I don't want to be wasting your time!

Megan

arnoud3272
08-12-2012, 02:57 AM
I started to get bored with the trunk. 2.5 hours and I was ready to stop. Painting is a lot faster than drawing in a realistic way. Even moderately realistic. Hyper-realistic drawings take several hundred hours.
:)

meganj
08-12-2012, 01:35 PM
I worked more on the trunk to give it more interest. Thank you for keeping me focused!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2012/67498-108_treefinished.jpg

arnoud3272
08-12-2012, 04:33 PM
Good job, Megan :clap:. Nice result, a big improvement :thumbsup:.

Mahbubani
08-24-2012, 04:45 PM
Hello Arnoud,
Here is my first sketch for this class