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Notorious D
06-15-2011, 03:02 PM
Hi all!
I know technically you can paint oil over acrylic (since that what most gesso is) but has anyone give it a shot? What were the results? And most importantly how did you varnish it?

I'm really interested in doing a very abstracted background and feel the acrylic will give me what I'm going for (and faster), but I'm worried it will look strange...

Thanks in advance!
D

Termini.
06-16-2011, 01:20 AM
Hi all!
I know technically you can paint oil over acrylic (since that what most gesso is) but has anyone give it a shot? What were the results? And most importantly how did you varnish it?

I'm really interested in doing a very abstracted background and feel the acrylic will give me what I'm going for (and faster), but I'm worried it will look strange...

Thanks in advance!
D

Try it and see how it looks. Get some inexpensive canvas panels, put worry in a nice little box with a bunch of comfortable pillows, and gently close the lid, and act like you are going to gently put the box on the shelf, then quickly run that thing out to the garbage can. Then sit down and try your ideas.

Notorious D
06-16-2011, 09:37 AM
lol! thanks!

Einion
06-16-2011, 09:57 AM
I know technically you can paint oil over acrylic (since that what most gesso is) but has anyone give it a shot?
It is not that uncommon to paint in oils over some form of acrylic underpainting.

It is worth bearing in mind that acrylic 'gesso' primer and acrylic paint are quite different as a rule in terms of their surface, so it's not really a like-for-like thing. However some recent information (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=888702) suggests that this is not as relevant as previously supposed (limited data set though, see further discussion here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=914092)).

And most importantly how did you varnish it?
You'd varnish it the same way you would a work done entirely in oil paint (many acrylic paintings are now varnished using the same types of varnish that are used by oil painters anyway, spirit-borne varnishes made from synthetic resins).

Einion

MarkMark
06-16-2011, 12:48 PM
I havent tried but that is because I cant see the any gain in doing so. However it is perfectly acceptable to do so. I would give it a crack and seed how it fits with your style and what you want to achieve

Notorious D
06-17-2011, 02:14 PM
It is not that uncommon to paint in oils over some form of acrylic underpainting.

It is worth bearing in mind that acrylic 'gesso' primer and acrylic paint are quite different as a rule in terms of their surface, so it's not really a like-for-like thing. However some recent information (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=888702) suggests that this is not as relevant as previously supposed (limited data set though, see further discussion here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=914092)).


You'd varnish it the same way you would a work done entirely in oil paint (many acrylic paintings are now varnished using the same types of varnish that are used by oil painters anyway, spirit-borne varnishes made from synthetic resins).

Einion


Thank you very very much, that thread has some great experience! I sell, so its important to find out if the work will hold together! Thanks again!

Termini.
06-17-2011, 03:11 PM
As Einion said, you can use a solvent based varnish on acrylic. Shellac doesn't stick very good to strictly acrylic. Combo acrylics in house paints etc. are a different matter. If you are going to paint with the oil on top of an acrylic layer, one thing you may want to consider is applying a layer of damar retouch to the acrylic first. Only use if you can do so safely of course, as it contains turpentine and some people have problems with that. Also, only use the damar if the support is a rigid surface, such as panel. Damar retouch is available in spray. Then paint on that with the oils. In the immediate sense oils will adhere to acrylic, but over time they can lose adhesion. I have seen this happen. If you use the damar retouch, the damar will stick to the acrylic, and the oil will stick to the damar. Sort of a sandwich. For a final varnish, acrylics can be varnished with full strength spirit varnishes within a day or two of the film drying (to give them ample time to fully dry). Oil paint should not be varnished for 6 months to a year depending on thickness. Therefore if mixed media, it should not be varnished until the oil film has time to cure (oxidize). It should be varnished at one time, so if it is mixed media, and parts can be varnished immediately, I would wait till the oil was cured, and do the whole piece at one time.

Corcoranart
06-17-2011, 09:22 PM
I do this a lot. Using Acrylics as a background, then, once dry on goes the oil paint. I paint large formats 6ft x 6ft and 75 " x 90 " linen on top quality stretchers.
You can even 'experiment' with loads of gels and one of my favorites is gesso and sand, then, the acrylic backgrounds and even...aerosol spray paint.

Just remember Oil on Acrylic never Acrylic on Oil.
I Have finished some paintings with enamel paint (liquid and unusual mixes layers into layers).

There's loads of possibilities depending on your type of art. If you're doing portraits, still life, Figurative work Oil on it's own is cool, or Acrylic on it's own...Oil paints have a richer more fluid coloration. Acrylic is great for speed and productivity... Large paintings suck up a lot of paint...acrylics especially good quality ones are pricey...Oil paints are also expensive especially the extra fine (which I use for the finishing - more dense pigment)

More important is the 'good feeling' you need to paint a decent painting. Somedays I would even say most days it's a blank head...but just keep the colors in view not in drawers but on shelves so that you can pick them up instantly...art is really about instinct... lastly, experimentation is necessary in art...collages, spray, structure and destructuration, use of textiles, etc etc etc Gold leaf, Aluminium leaf you name it !!! even on wooden recycled doors...

FloatingDove
06-17-2011, 10:38 PM
You can also give your acrylics some 'tooth' if you want to, add talcum (baby powder) or calcium carbonate which is an ingredient in gesso; I find calcium carbonate brings the oils to a matte finish and the powder a not so matte finish.