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CSForest
05-21-2011, 05:17 PM
I'm learning Photoshop and am thinking it might be a good way to start a painting since it's easier to move elements around to try different combinations, and adjust colors. The question is, once I get it just the way I like it, what's the best way to transfer it onto my real canvas so I can paint over it?

Freesail
05-21-2011, 06:46 PM
A projector and carefully trace the drawing?

DaveGhmn
05-21-2011, 07:42 PM
A while ago I tried this.

Tried printing on rice paper, then placing the printout on the canvas and using a damp sponge to transfer the image to the canvas.

Vague areas of color... no good.

Tried printing on t-shirt transfer paper, which allows you to iron an image onto fabric.

Gacky, nasty and useless transfer... no good.

Tried printing on inkjet canvas.

OK results, but the inkjet canvas, which is pretty lightweight, has to be glued down to a more substantial support... at least hardboard.

Best way is to train your eye by using your favorite gridding method... draw a grid on the computer image and a corresponding grid on your canvas and transfer the points of interest region-by-region using charcoal, pencil (some say this is a no-no) or a thin wash and brush.

llawrence
05-21-2011, 09:15 PM
Draw?

Improv
05-21-2011, 10:00 PM
Draw?

Draw? That's that new idea that just came out, right? ;)

kevinwueste
05-21-2011, 11:14 PM
A painting teacher who specializes in hyper-photo realism at my school The Academy of Art University in San Francisco, CA prints out the photo on high-quality, acid free paper and uses acrylic matt to 'glue" the print to a canvas support. He then grids out key elements on the photo ( because very quickly the photo goes by-by) and begins painting in oils over top.

I have not witnessed this whole process just have seen the final works which do look amazing though I admit I became massively non-plussed when I found out they were paint-overs. That is merely a personal opinion.

Kevin

Wassie
05-22-2011, 02:48 AM
I compose on the computer with Adobe PhotoShop. Then I create a layer and trace just the outline of the drawing on that layer. I print just the outline on transparent paper and then I use vine charcoal to go over the outline on the back side of the transparent paper. Then I transfer the drawing to the canvas using a pencil or stylus.

I make the drawing the size I want the final to be, say 16x20". My printer only prints letter size. So, I divide the image into 4 sections, each 8x10". It sounds like a lot of work, but actually, it isn't. I think drawing a grid is more trouble. I can't draw each square the same size.

ArtyRolina
05-22-2011, 04:50 AM
There are some other methods that I have seen used and that is to pay for a print on canvas by one of those print companies online and then paint on top of that, although I guess that would be rather expensive and probably a bit pointless.

Another way that I saw used while I was in the printmaking dept at uni and that was a screenprint onto canvas.

I, personally would recommend squaring up, really!

BeeCeeEss
05-22-2011, 01:24 PM
The fastest and simplest methods that I've used are either an opaque projector or using a grid method to enlarge and draw the image onto the painting surface.

Beverly

Alan P. in OC
05-22-2011, 03:55 PM
I compose on the computer with Adobe PhotoShop. Then I create a layer and trace just the outline of the drawing on that layer. I print just the outline on transparent paper and then I use vine charcoal to go over the outline on the back side of the transparent paper. Then I transfer the drawing to the canvas using a pencil or stylus.

I make the drawing the size I want the final to be, say 16x20". My printer only prints letter size. So, I divide the image into 4 sections, each 8x10". It sounds like a lot of work, but actually, it isn't. I think drawing a grid is more trouble. I can't draw each square the same size.

I do this exact same thing, except I simply print out the photos actual size (don't make a special outline layer), trace around the main elements/value changes, and continue as above. I used to do the grid thing but found it unnecessary work; once the main components are traced on the support, it's easy enough to put in any additional details freehand, if necessary.

Keith Russell
05-22-2011, 04:53 PM
...prints out the photo on[to] high-quality, acid free paper and uses acrylic matt to 'glue" the print to a canvas support. He then grids out key elements on the photo...and begins painting in oils over top...the final works...look amazing, though I admit I became massively non-plussed when I found out they were paint-overs.

Yeah, this is a great way to create an image--if you don't mind having your work tied directly, and inextricably, to the limits of photography...

CSForest
05-23-2011, 12:10 PM
I make the drawing the size I want the final to be, say 16x20". My printer only prints letter size. So, I divide the image into 4 sections, each 8x10". It sounds like a lot of work, but actually, it isn't. I think drawing a grid is more trouble. I can't draw each square the same size.
Oh, that's a good idea. My printer only prints letter size too so I was wondering how tracing/transferring a printed image would work on a larger canvas. I have used the grid method before and find it a bit of a hassle and not very accurate sometimes.

annie.nz
05-24-2011, 12:33 AM
If you want to print a custom-sized pic, such as an outline drawing, that is larger than your printer paper, download the neat little open-source freeware program posterazer, which saves your image as a multi-page pdf file which can then be printed across several sheets of paper. With or without overlap margins to allow sellotaping together.

Then go over the lines with charcoal on the back of the paper, and transfer as wassie has described.
This assumes that you want an outline drawing as your end result of course, rather than a fully detailed photo.

It's really useful - my husband uses it for scaling up stained glass designs.

http://posterazor.sourceforge.net/

Dennis
05-24-2011, 09:15 AM
I compose many of my paintings in Photoshop. The image size in Photoshop is the same as the canvas I intend to paint on. I then create a layer on top of the image and draw a one or two inch grid (using the rulers) and print out the image. On the canvas I lightly scribe a charcoal grid and then draw the image onto the canvas using the grid as a guide. In areas of great detail, I reduce the size of the grid to say 1/2".

Regards,

Dennis

edf
05-24-2011, 06:37 PM
I've seen material printed on acrylic paper and then painted over.

Spudboy
05-24-2011, 08:14 PM
Doing something similar right now. Edited a photo I took using GIMP, printed it, enlarged it at the copier, and now the next step is going to be using transfer paper to get this onto the panel (F6, so nothing huge). This is like carbon paper, but is not supposed to show up through paint.

http://www.dickblick.com/categories/transferpapers/transferpapers/details/

The word of warning I've received on this is not to apply too much pressure when going over the drawing to transfer it, or you'll put dents and ridges in the panel/canvas.

autolisp
06-19-2011, 06:44 AM
Hello everyone. For those of you wanting to create grids on your painting reference printouts I have the following link for you.

http://www.richardrosenman.com/software/downloads/

It is a photoshop FREE plugin from the author. It will allow you to create a grid on your image before printing. You can select the number of squares you want as well as changing the colour of the lines. I'm not sure if it works in other applications, but I do know it works in early versions of PaintShop Pro (I use version 5).

autolisp

mariposa-art
06-19-2011, 02:58 PM
I have not witnessed this whole process just have seen the final works which do look amazing though I admit I became massively non-plussed when I found out they were paint-overs. That is merely a personal opinion.

That would be my personal opinion as well.

I would also advocate drawing! :thumbsup:

However, I have a nice collection of photo references, and since I apparently do not possess the discipline to keep the image within the canvas (something always seems to drift off the edge on some of the smaller canvases where I zoom in real tight :rolleyes: ) I have started to prepare my composition in Photoshop, and make a "grid" of four boxes (divide the frame into four parts). I am hoping that this basic grid guide will allow me to keep the composition where I want it, but without a lot of itty bitty grid squares which I fear would drive me nuts and would be time consuming to prepare.

oicclouds
06-19-2011, 06:20 PM
A power point projector perhaps??? They are getting cheaper....