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Johannes Instructor
04-09-2011, 01:20 PM
DOWNLOADABLE LESSONS NOW AVAILABLE!


We are pleased to announce that the first half of the series (12 lessons), “Paint Stunning Landscapes from Photos” is now available for purchase and download from Northlight. These are the recordings of the classes you have been taking. You can buy the whole set or individual lessons. They can be permanently stored on your hard drive or copied on DVD’s to play in your DVD player on TV (compatible DVD player). You may want to do that for the demos.
They are offering a 10% discount when you type in “WCLIVE” in the apply code box which is located about an inch below after you click on “Add to Cart”. Click on this link to access the downloadable lessons:
HTTP://IMPROVEMYPAINTINGS.COM/RECORDED%20CLASSES.HTML
RIGHT CLICK ON THE DOWNLOAD LINK AND SELECT "SAVE LINK AS" AND IT WILL DOWNLOAD ONTO YOUR DESKTOP OR WHEREVER YOU WANT IT TO GO. THEN IT WILL PLAY IN QUICK TIME PLAYER OR WHATEVER PLAYER YOU HAVE INSTALLED ON YOUR COMPUTER.

WEB CLASS HANDOUTS
You can download today’s handout (Handout class 21 photos to painting.pdf) as well as the previous handouts posted at this link:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=13306872#post13306872

WEB CLASS INFO
Today we have an important class. The first hour Johannes will go over the bare tree submissions. During the second hour he will teach on color harmony. You don’t want to miss that. The web class room will be open at 2 PM EST (1 hour early class starts at 3 PM EST) so you can assure your place by boarding early. We are overbooked.

On behalf of F&W media (publisher of the “The Artist’s Magazine” as well as many instructional books sold worldwide) and Johannes Vloothuis, we welcome you.
Don’t forget to visit our Recommended Books section to purchase very useful books on landscape painting.
http://improvemypaintings.com/recommended%20books.html

wetbob
04-09-2011, 02:17 PM
Great a guest, Nice Johannes!

wetbob
04-09-2011, 02:18 PM
can we see his work?

elsie50
04-09-2011, 06:11 PM
Still listening, to the webinar, as I type... This has been an absolutely riveting lesson Johannes, I have been painting for a few years, and haven't done too bad, but you put a colour wheel in front of me and my mind would go blank, you have made it so clear. I am itching to start on mine, but had better go to bed first, as it is past 11... Thank Johannes.

oCDs01-711
04-09-2011, 06:22 PM
Brilliant class. So many concepts clearly and simply stated. I am one of the "lurkers," and I listen very attentively. Today's lessons on color harmony was so worth the time! Thank you. :clap:

GypsyPainter
04-09-2011, 07:06 PM
While I am not a newbie to Wet Canvas articles or to P&W Publications, this is the first Webinar class for me. I recently joined WC and this is my first post. I have been painting for many years and have learned more from Johannes's classes than all the others I have taken rolled into one. Johannes, I want to thank you for all the little "gems" that no one ever shared with me in the past. My enthusiam had become nonexistent but now I am motivated and excited when I pick up my paint brush.

oils4me
04-09-2011, 07:35 PM
Yes I have to agree with the others...while all of your classes are excellent todays was really WOW...maybe it's because things are starting to come together but totally wowed by the lesson today, thank you so much. I'm downloading the two classes that I missed, and I just want to say that I hope everyone is buying the books and downloading the lessons, this kind of training would cost thousands of dollars if we were to attend workshops. I have ordered all but two of the books and I'm going to do that now...so grateful to F&W for making this possible, to Johannes for sharing so freely with us, what a gift you are...to Kenneth for putting up with us and answering our questions and to Judy...thank you all...can't say it enough....:)

oils4me
04-09-2011, 07:45 PM
ps... I downloaded lesson 7, and it's great...the quality is excellent, wow I think I'll download this weekends too, will you let us know when it's available? I know I'll want to refer to the lesson on color harmony frequently...:)

pat-trew
04-09-2011, 08:27 PM
If you have yellow ochre , can you modify it to become a yellow ochre pale?

Johannes Instructor
04-09-2011, 08:33 PM
If you have yellow ochre , can you modify it to become a yellow ochre pale?

You can add cadmiun lemon or other primary yellows but I would still buy the yellow ochre pale. It is just great for landscape painting. I can't live with out. the advantage of this pigment is it doesn't get chalky.

jmcedeno
04-09-2011, 08:53 PM
Johannes, I'm deeply grateful for your review of my painting in today's class, I'm humbled by your positive comments which are very encouraging. I was inspired by one of the paintings on Ted Kautzky's book, I have all his books which we studied in architectural school to learn architectural renderings in pencil, and watercolor.
And, thank you for such brilliant class today on color harmony, I learned today in three hours what I didn't in lots of books and workshops for years.

Johannes Instructor
04-09-2011, 09:01 PM
Johannes, I'm deeply grateful for your review of my painting in today's class, I'm humbled by your positive comments which are very encouraging. I was inspired by one of the paintings on Ted Kautzky's book, I have all his books which we studied in architectural school to learn architectural renderings in pencil, and watercolor.
And, thank you for such brilliant class today on color harmony, I learned today in three hours what I didn't in lots of books and workshops for years.
He is known for his dry brush technique. He handles foliage nicely too. I am not that crazy about his dark values and some color schemes he uses.
Here are some pages of that book.
http://books.google.ca/books?id=k_FW2sIMH6QC&printsec=frontcover&dq=ways+with+watercolor&source=bl&ots=KhO-Sa2DGx&sig=PvEXAMzbOS-oiSHbWquMQPXmMbA&hl=en&ei=SwGhTZC1FM2Q0QHy-dyABQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CCgQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false

Tresgatos
04-09-2011, 10:05 PM
Johannes,

Thank you once again for a very informative class and your critique of the winter trees I had done. It's really helpful when you point out how to improve. Had no idea the cheaper paints would cause mud when mixing although I have experienced it : (

I've been using the "other" cheaper brands and because of the information you gave I wanted to get a better brand of acrylics. Went out to the on-line stores that sell the W&N and after I checked 3 places was surprised they don't have Viridian or Indian Red in the W&N Acrylics. They have it in oil only which I have mostly avoided because of my Asthma.

I did consider using the Oil that cleans up with water but wasn't sure if the quality of the paint is good - any thoughts on that?

Do you happen to purchase your Winsor & Newton acrylics from one of the on-line art stores that you could recommend?

Any assistance you could give would be greatly appreciated.

Barbara

beart
04-10-2011, 12:08 AM
I thought the videos probably would have the cuts, someone losing video, etc but they edited them pro style. I missed the first two weekends before I knew about the class. I've told several about the class but they think they are too old to be learning more. I don't think you are ever to old to learn. I thought I had good paintings but looking at yours made me want to make mine better. Last week the one I painted was the worse ever I painted but I had to work on my computer all week and was frustrated and just was not thinking as I knew the background should be lighter etc. It was like a different person was painting. Have you ever had days like that? Some one once told me I had many personalities and looking at this last painting I believe it. About the Harmony class, I think you did a real good job at explaining it. I thought you took a color and spread it here and there in your painting to harmonize. I think the putting yellow in every color on a sunshine day is a simple way to do it. Thanks again Johannes

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 12:24 AM
Johannes,

Thank you once again for a very informative class and your critique of the winter trees I had done. It's really helpful when you point out how to improve. Had no idea the cheaper paints would cause mud when mixing although I have experienced it : (

I've been using the "other" cheaper brands and because of the information you gave I wanted to get a better brand of acrylics. Went out to the on-line stores that sell the W&N and after I checked 3 places was surprised they don't have Viridian or Indian Red in the W&N Acrylics. They have it in oil only which I have mostly avoided because of my Asthma.

I did consider using the Oil that cleans up with water but wasn't sure if the quality of the paint is good - any thoughts on that?

Do you happen to purchase your Winsor & Newton acrylics from one of the on-line art stores that you could recommend?

Any assistance you could give would be greatly appreciated.

Barbara
Honestly I would prefer water soluble oils over acrylics. The pigments themselves in oils and acrylics are exactly the same so if health is your concern you gain nothing using acrylics over oils. For example burnt sienna pigment is exactly the same in oils, watercolor, acrylics, and pastels. The only difference bewteen them is the binder that holds the powder together. The binder for oils is usually linseed oil which is no more or less toxic than cooking oil. It comes from totally natural sources. The only thing left then would be the petroleum based solvents such as turpentine and mineral spirits which is what some people are concerned about breathing. When you use water soluble oils you will eliminate the solvents so you are now in the same boat as with acrylics but without the blending advantages. The three leading online stores that have discount prices are, rexart, cheap joe's or dickblick. I would cross check prices in each. I would order the winsor & newton water solubles that are not student quality.

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 12:36 AM
We all go thru this. Most artists in galleries show you you they want you to see, not their duds and all the artists I know don't demo a painting unless they have done it before to make sure they don't goof up.

Rosemarie
04-10-2011, 01:35 AM
In Robert notes it says" Don't mix Ultramarine blue, Burnt or Raw sienna for watercolors. Use Cobalt blue" in which context did that come up, as you use just those three colours as your workhorses?

When you talked about colours you mentioned Yellow Ochre and I understand you use it in oils. Is the Raw sienna in watercolour the "substitution" because it is transparent (W&N) and not opaque?

Tresgatos
04-10-2011, 01:37 AM
Johannes,

Thank you for the feedback on the paint and on-line art stores - appreciate your time and effort given. I look forward to tomorrow's demo.

Barbara

Kandrea
04-10-2011, 07:40 AM
:grouphug: Hi, Johannes. I'm sorry I've been out of class for awhile. I've been taking care of my mother until she passed on April 2. I would like to resume class and can't seem to recall how to get back as I haven't received any emails to enter classes since I dropped out for a time. Please let me know how to get back in. Thanks, Andrea

LadyMadonna
04-10-2011, 08:19 AM
I would like to join all of my new friends in thanking Johannes for all of the webinars and demos he has so kindly and patiently explained to all of us. I have purchased most of the books and plan to buy all the webinars as well. I am of the opinion that the internet can be an amazing tool for learning and I have learnt so much along the way. When I look back on my paintings from last summer when I so lost, and see how my own personal artist's journey has grown in large part to all the information I have absorbed through this site and Johannes's help.
Mr. Vloothuis...you are our " golden nugget' !

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 08:42 AM
I would like to join all of my new friends in thanking Johannes for all of the webinars and demos he has so kindly and patiently explained to all of us. I have purchased most of the books and plan to buy all the webinars as well. I am of the opinion that the internet can be an amazing tool for learning and I have learnt so much along the way. When I look back on my paintings from last summer when I so lost, and see how my own personal artist's journey has grown in large part to all the information I have absorbed through this site and Johannes's help.
Mr. Vloothuis...you are our " golden nugget' !
Thank you so much.

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 08:44 AM
:grouphug: Hi, Johannes. I'm sorry I've been out of class for awhile. I've been taking care of my mother until she passed on April 2. I would like to resume class and can't seem to recall how to get back as I haven't received any emails to enter classes since I dropped out for a time. Please let me know how to get back in. Thanks, Andrea
I'm sorry about your loss. I'm sure your art will help you with the grieving. Sign up here
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/616569648

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 08:46 AM
In Robert notes it says" Don't mix Ultramarine blue, Burnt or Raw sienna for watercolors. Use Cobalt blue" in which context did that come up, as you use just those three colours as your workhorses?

When you talked about colours you mentioned Yellow Ochre and I understand you use it in oils. Is the Raw sienna in watercolour the "substitution" because it is transparent (W&N) and not opaque?
I find that ultramarine blue and burnt sienna end up making a muddy color for rocks and tree branches. It seems that cobalt blue gives a cleaner gray over ultramarine blue. Maybe because cobalt has a bit of white in it it is too stubborn to give in so fast to making an absolute gray. Try it yourself. Mix some color swatches and see what the outcome is.

Lin Frye
04-10-2011, 08:54 AM
Johannes! What an awesome seminar today!!!! BLESSINGS for such generosity and wisdom! And thank you too for the review of my winter tree -- exceptionally helpful!!!

You mentioned that watercolorists can use pastels over that medium for highlights and the light. I've never used pastels and would appreciate your recommendation for a kind of pastel - oil? chalk? And any good book for a beginner to this medium.

THANK YOU! And I am so looking forward to your demo today!

BTW, I ordered all of the lessons thusfar. My internet connection is very slow, so it will take me a week to download them all -- but once downloaded, the quality is INCREDIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And again worth every cent -- and must more ---

Thank you again!

Lin

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 09:02 AM
In Robert notes it says" Don't mix Ultramarine blue, Burnt or Raw sienna for watercolors. Use Cobalt blue" in which context did that come up, as you use just those three colours as your workhorses?

When you talked about colours you mentioned Yellow Ochre and I understand you use it in oils. Is the Raw sienna in watercolour the "substitution" because it is transparent (W&N) and not opaque?

yellow ochre pale for oils
raw sienna for watercolor

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 09:04 AM
Johannes! What an awesome seminar today!!!! BLESSINGS for such generosity and wisdom! And thank you too for the review of my winter tree -- exceptionally helpful!!!

You mentioned that watercolorists can use pastels over that medium for highlights and the light. I've never used pastels and would appreciate your recommendation for a kind of pastel - oil? chalk? And any good book for a beginner to this medium.

THANK YOU! And I am so looking forward to your demo today!

BTW, I ordered all of the lessons thusfar. My internet connection is very slow, so it will take me a week to download them all -- but once downloaded, the quality is INCREDIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And again worth every cent -- and must more ---

Thank you again!

Lin
Definitely chalk for watercolors. Pastels and watercolor are a match made in heaven. Doesn't work on rough paper though. It gets too grainy.

Lin Frye
04-10-2011, 09:12 AM
Thank you so much -- I'll be looking for some of these!

Lin

Eddypus1
04-10-2011, 10:18 AM
Hi Johannes, I could not attend the class yesterday, but I see you use the term chalky. I paint with watercolor and also pastel, what does chalky mean? Is that like opaque or muddy?

sherrysherman
04-10-2011, 10:21 AM
Thank you so much -- I'll be looking for some of these!

Lin
Lin, avoid any so-called pastels that say "chalk"' in the description. The pastels you are looking for are usually called "soft" pastels. There is no chalk in them, only pure pigment and a little binder. If you do a search for "pastels," that will take you to the right products. Oil pastels are a totally different medium and are referred to by the full name, "oil pastels."

Now there are also lots of brands of soft pastels. If you go to the Pastels area of WC, you can find plenty of discussion about the brands. :)

Lin Frye
04-10-2011, 10:24 AM
Thanks so much, Sherry -- I'll check them out ... pastels in any form are absolutely new to me ...

Lin

sherrysherman
04-10-2011, 10:32 AM
Thanks so much, Sherry -- I'll check them out ... pastels in any form are absolutely new to me ...

Lin
I love how he tells wet pigment painters to buy just these few tubes of specific colors.... then tells pastelists "buy as many as you can afford"!! Funny thing is, he doesn't really have to say that; we are addicted to all those wonderful colors anyhow.

If you're just using them for a few highlights and shadow on your watercolors, I don't think you'll need full arrays though. (Unless you get bitten by the bug.) :)

beart
04-10-2011, 10:49 AM
I just was going over Robert's notes and thought how good they were. I should have coped them for the river scene as my notes were not complete. Nice to have the notes to go along with the videos.

uthule13
04-10-2011, 11:24 AM
Johannes, I've bought several books, but don't need to download the lessons because I haven't missed a single session and have the handouts. Thank you so much for sharing your expertise and your patience.

Question: I'd be more than happy to pay for a one month extension that includes buildings and seascapes (no trees, because they've been well covered). Is there anything we can do to convince WC and/or North Light to offer such a course for a fee?

Anybody else interested in a continuation of this webinar for a price?

Colorix
04-10-2011, 11:30 AM
I will buy one of the books -- the only one I didn't have already!

csering
04-10-2011, 01:08 PM
I have so looked forward to class every weekend and have learned so much.
Living in southwest Florida......I did not think there would be much for me to
learn in last weeks lesson on winter trees. Boy, was I wrong! Because of
hurricanes in recent years there are many dead trees in our Florida landscape,
and driftwood on the beach. The lesson turned out to be invaluable for me.
Just goes to show you that there is always something new to learn.
Thanks Johannes.

Arantxa
04-10-2011, 01:11 PM
Johannes, do you get the Yellow Ochre Pale from Winsor and Newton?
Having the Yellow Ochre, do you just mix it with white ?
I hope you do more webinars. This has been great, thanmk you.

csering
04-10-2011, 01:19 PM
Barbara,
You might also want to check aswexpress.com for art supplies. Good prices, I order from them alot.

Cindy

robertsloan2
04-10-2011, 01:53 PM
Purr, big thanks to everyone who's enjoyed my notes. Sorry I didn't have the space to expand on the point about Ultramarine mixed with Raw or Burnt Sienna. I should probably add that to the top of today's notes, that Cobalt Blue makes better mixed grays with the Siennas.

Johannes mentioned in a previous class that Winsor & Newton's "Yellow Ochre Pale" in oils is his absolute favorite color. Different manufacturers use different variations of yellow ochre - all the ochres are earth pigments mined in different areas of the world. The one they use in Yellow Ochre Pale is lighter than the one in their regular Yellow Ochre, also yellower. Winsor & Newton also has Yellow Ochre Light in watercolor, it's the same pigment listing as their Yellow Ochre but yellower and lighter.

I can see how lightening it with a bit of neutral yellow would brighten up normal Yellow Ochre to that though, it frustrated me that they didn't have Yellow Ochre Pale in the Artisan watersoluble oils, which is what I got for working indoors since I don't have great ventilation here in my room.

I also got my copies of Mastering Composition and Powerful Watercolor Landscapes yesterday from North Light, that was so cool. So I've got all of his "Four Aces" now. I bought Carlson's Landscape Guide back when I was taking Colorix's class on Colourful Still Lifes in the Pastels Forum.

Sherry, I agree with Johannes 100% on "buy as many pastels as you can afford." I'm still boggled that Charlie managed to mix a color chart with only three primary pastels, though her six color split primaries palette did give cleaner hues. It takes a skilled painter to use a limited palette in pastels, a beginner's better off with lots and lots of hues, tints and shades.

Though I've reached a happy point now, when I consolidated all my different sets with 270 pieces in the Dakota Traveler box, I realized that was a complete palette. I'm not lacking any major hues or tints or shades, do have everything important in that. So it doesn't really take having the 525 color full range set of Sennelier unless you can afford that.

For others interested in pastels, there is a good rundown of essential colors in "Exploring Soft Pastels: Still Life the Colourful Way" class in the Pastel Library section, teacher Colorix. She recommended about 40 colors with yellow ochre along with the pure hues, though I treat the yellow ochre as the "shade" of yellow to darken it since it stays yellow unlike yellow shades that come out olive when mixed with black.

robertsloan2
04-10-2011, 06:22 PM
Gorgeous painting! Demo was fantastic. Johannes, you really outdid yourself this time, it was glorious. Thank you for so many tips - both on color in general and on watercolor painting. You're a genius with watercolor, no wonder the Mexican President made you the national watercolor artist when he did. That was incredible.

Of course I'm completely intimidated at trying to paint that myself, but I'll have a go and might even dare to use the Rough surface Arches block I got so many years ago. I usually use cold press, didn't dare try rough but it's time to jump in and try. Wonderful techniques.

I missed the very last bit of your detailing where you mentioned using a Winsor or Dioxazine Violet glaze - where I'd use that would be to unify shadows, would that be right? I used to do something like that in colored pencils when I did colored pencils realism, glaze over all sunlit areas with Cream (a pale golden yellow) and all shadow areas with Lavender, which would leave all the local color reading true but still give an intense impression of sunlight.

So there's my color tip for doing it in colored pencils if anyone's into Prismacolors. It works the same. But OMG that Quinacridone Glaze "miracle glaze" came out so gorgeous. My jaw dropped at what it did to those trees. Everything intensified but unified.

Nettie Jane
04-10-2011, 06:25 PM
Yes, I downloaded all 12 of the videos yesterday evening from North Light in just over an hour. The process was clear, quick and easy. You have made all the Internet instruction on how to use the technology to arrive at destinations to watch you incredibly clear and easy to follow. Like the new video provider much better. Love all the classes and the wonderful instruction you provide free and the affordable prices the videos are. Thanks Johannes and North Light, and F & W.:clap:

dljaques
04-10-2011, 07:22 PM
Johannes, I've bought several books, but don't need to download the lessons because I haven't missed a single session and have the handouts. Thank you so much for sharing your expertise and your patience.

Question: I'd be more than happy to pay for a one month extension that includes buildings and seascapes (no trees, because they've been well covered). Is there anything we can do to convince WC and/or North Light to offer such a course for a fee?

Anybody else interested in a continuation of this webinar for a price?


YES!!!!! I AM!!!!!
Dixie

tennisqueen
04-10-2011, 07:37 PM
I downloaded all 12 videos and purchased a couple of books, as I am so thrilled to watch the ones I missed, and watch the ones I have already seen because there is so much information that Johannes has given us, that I don't want to miss a single golden nugget!!!! Thank you, Johannes and F&W for allowing us to have this wonderful opportunity of learning from a fabulous teacher, and a special thank you to Robert, for your incredible notes!!!!!!

Judy:clap:

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 08:04 PM
Gorgeous painting! Demo was fantastic. Johannes, you really outdid yourself this time, it was glorious. Thank you for so many tips - both on color in general and on watercolor painting. You're a genius with watercolor, no wonder the Mexican President made you the national watercolor artist when he did. That was incredible.

Of course I'm completely intimidated at trying to paint that myself, but I'll have a go and might even dare to use the Rough surface Arches block I got so many years ago. I usually use cold press, didn't dare try rough but it's time to jump in and try. Wonderful techniques.

I missed the very last bit of your detailing where you mentioned using a Winsor or Dioxazine Violet glaze - where I'd use that would be to unify shadows, would that be right? I used to do something like that in colored pencils when I did colored pencils realism, glaze over all sunlit areas with Cream (a pale golden yellow) and all shadow areas with Lavender, which would leave all the local color reading true but still give an intense impression of sunlight.

So there's my color tip for doing it in colored pencils if anyone's into Prismacolors. It works the same. But OMG that Quinacridone Glaze "miracle glaze" came out so gorgeous. My jaw dropped at what it did to those trees. Everything intensified but unified.

Thanks Robert. The idea is to finish the course with fireworks. The dioxazine Violet is for negative painting. It somehow does not go black when I use that. But be timid with it. You don't want dark accents.

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 08:39 PM
From what I am seeing in the threads it seems there were no issues with the web cam this evening.

rmincklerca
04-10-2011, 08:58 PM
Johannes
Kudos and a painting question

This weekend was an informative, and inspiring capstone of the past months. Now that I have endured your comprehensive classes I have experienced a deepening of my appreciation and understanding of the craft and art of landscape painting. I feel confident enough to apply much of what you have presented so well over the last few weeks. Also, as high school teacher of some 30 plus years, I was surprised, delighted, impressed to observe and recognize the inspiring traits of a Master Teacher and Master Artist - your intense and inspiring enthusiasm and commitment to your students of all experience levels in the comments and in your teaching. critiques and demos. In short (no sucking up here) it was an inspiring pleasure to see a true master at work. With Roberts notes and your water lour demos and dvds I can only develop when I apply myself. Thanks!

Now for a painting question re: pastel or watercolor painting of Cherry Trees in Blossom with green grass - How would you handle painting a cherry tree in blossom with green grass in the foreground? We have so many out here in BC.

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 09:24 PM
Johannes
Kudos and a painting question

This weekend was an informative, and inspiring capstone of the past months. Now that I have endured your comprehensive classes I have experienced a deepening of my appreciation and understanding of the craft and art of landscape painting. I feel confident enough to apply much of what you have presented so well over the last few weeks. Also, as high school teacher of some 30 plus years, I was surprised, delighted, impressed to observe and recognize the inspiring traits of a Master Teacher and Master Artist - your intense and inspiring enthusiasm and commitment to your students of all experience levels in the comments and in your teaching. critiques and demos. In short (no sucking up here) it was an inspiring pleasure to see a true master at work. With Roberts notes and your water lour demos and dvds I can only develop when I apply myself. Thanks!

Now for a painting question re: pastel or watercolor painting of Cherry Trees in Blossom with green grass - How would you handle painting a cherry tree in blossom with green grass in the foreground? We have so many out here in BC.
You don't have to create green grass necessarily. You can change it to ochre grass. Also you can change the pink of the cherry tree by adding a bit of cadmium orange to bring it to red orange.

allydoodle
04-10-2011, 09:26 PM
Well, I already have almost all the books you've recommended Johannes, but I did buy "Your Artist's Brain", "Powerful Watercolor Landscapes", and "A Painter's Guide to Design and Composition". With the 10% discount, I figured I would also add Maggie Price's new book "Painting Sunlight and Shadows in Pastels". My library on landscape books is getting crazy big, but I figure "why not, it's all good stuff!".

It was good to see that I had five of the books you recommended, so I guess I was on the right track, now even more so with the wonderful webinars and these additional four books!

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 09:38 PM
Johannes, do you get the Yellow Ochre Pale from Winsor and Newton?
Having the Yellow Ochre, do you just mix it with white ?
I hope you do more webinars. This has been great, thanmk you.
Yes, I use winsor and newton yellow ochre pale.

Johannes Instructor
04-10-2011, 09:40 PM
Well, I already have almost all the books you've recommended Johannes, but I did buy "Your Artist's Brain", "Powerful Watercolor Landscapes", and "A Painter's Guide to Design and Composition". With the 10% discount, I figured I would also add Maggie Price's new book "Painting Sunlight and Shadows in Pastels". My library on landscape books is getting crazy big, but I figure "why not, it's all good stuff!".

It was good to see that I had five of the books you recommended, so I guess I was on the right track, now even more so with the wonderful webinars and these additional four books!
Hey why not? is there any life out of art?

rmincklerca
04-10-2011, 10:30 PM
Johannes
A quick reply regarding the cheery tree questions. My wife and I were thinking a bit warmer on the pink. Looks like we learned something and intuited what to do.

PS Any plans for another webinar before you head out to teaach on the road?

Thanks once again.

Lin Frye
04-11-2011, 07:39 AM
Thank you so much, Johannes for another brilliant demo and incredible information! The webcast was PERFECT -- even with my slow connection! I am really going to hate to see these end ... but can't imagine how tired you must be after the weekend ..


Lin

painterted
04-11-2011, 10:46 AM
Jonannes, I would like to see you put on a 2 week course on watercolor. I have taken several courses on this subject and know that I wasn't shown the proper basics. You opened my eyes to so much, and I wan't to know more.

ted

born to paint
04-11-2011, 11:23 AM
Hi Johannes, Thanks so much for these lessons. They are invaluable. Don't know if you are famiiar with this book but I found it very helpful on the subject of light. It's called Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter by James Gurney. I came across it in an ER Hamilton catalog but perhaps F&W carries it also. Thanks again.

robertsloan2
04-11-2011, 11:23 AM
Jonannes, I would like to see you put on a 2 week course on watercolor. I have taken several courses on this subject and know that I wasn't shown the proper basics. You opened my eyes to so much, and I wan't to know more.

ted

I'll second that! My watercolor techniques are not comparable to what I can do in pastels or colored pencils, yet watercolor is such a wonderful, portable medium for outdoor landscape painting. I was glued to yesterday's demo watching what you did as much as writing down what you said, there was too much for me to try to describe what I was picking up from seeing you handle the brush and the water.

I really am going to have to get an actual Windex type spray bottle though, I think.

Edit: I went downstairs and asked my daughter if she had a spare one. She did! Adjustable between a fan spray and a tight strong stream, perfectly clean, so now that's sitting in my watercolor kit with the rest of my stuff. Going to have to try spraying out something next time I paint! I'll probably have to on my copy or study of Jo's painting this week considering that I'm nowhere near his league in watercolors.

beart
04-11-2011, 11:41 AM
Hi Johannes,
The great big bang I was talking about was Thunder Over Louisville which is next Saturday here. I wish I was able to go down there and paint as TV is no comparison although it gives you some ideas and with your photo instruction and the computer I guess you could paint it by snapping a photo. The amazing part is the 2nd Street Bridge that looks like a waterfall in lots of colors, very beautiful. I think it is great that you will be going out with fireworks.:D This is a awesome show advertised a the biggest ever.

Johannes Instructor
04-11-2011, 01:04 PM
Hi Johannes, Thanks so much for these lessons. They are invaluable. Don't know if you are famiiar with this book but I found it very helpful on the subject of light. It's called Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter by James Gurney. I came across it in an ER Hamilton catalog but perhaps F&W carries it also. Thanks again.
You realize I am in Hamilton and am inviting some people over to the Sunday plein air painting in Stoney Creek?

jmcedeno
04-11-2011, 01:24 PM
YES!!!!! I AM!!!!!
Dixie
Count me in too, spread the word we might get something rolling.

northbank
04-11-2011, 05:09 PM
[QUOTE=robertsloan2]I'll second that! My watercolor techniques are not comparable to what I can do in pastels or colored pencils, yet watercolor is such a wonderful, portable medium for outdoor landscape painting. I was glued to yesterday's demo watching what you did as much as writing down what you said, there was too much for me to try to describe what I was picking up from seeing you handle the brush and the water.

I'll third that. I am hungry to learn all that I can about watercolor.

Anoella
04-11-2011, 07:45 PM
I'll second that! My watercolor techniques are not comparable to what I can do in pastels or colored pencils, yet watercolor is such a wonderful, portable medium for outdoor landscape painting. I was glued to yesterday's demo watching what you did as much as writing down what you said, there was too much for me to try to describe what I was picking up from seeing you handle the brush and the water.

I really am going to have to get an actual Windex type spray bottle though, I think.

Edit: I went downstairs and asked my daughter if she had a spare one. She did! Adjustable between a fan spray and a tight strong stream, perfectly clean, so now that's sitting in my watercolor kit with the rest of my stuff. Going to have to try spraying out something next time I paint! I'll probably have to on my copy or study of Jo's painting this week considering that I'm nowhere near his league in watercolors.

I will fourth that! I paint with pastels but after watching Johannes paint with watercolour I have a great desire to learn this too.

Lin Frye
04-11-2011, 07:46 PM
Omgracious --- Count Me In Too ....!

ARTDIGGER
04-11-2011, 11:25 PM
Will the videos be available on disk rather than downloads?

Johannes Instructor
04-12-2011, 08:38 AM
Will the videos be available on disk rather than downloads?
I don't know but you can put them on DVD

surob
04-12-2011, 11:12 AM
I learned something about the spray bottle last night. I was using it on Arches 300# cold press. There must be a power wash setting on my spray bottle because I blasted the paper. Maybe a little advise from me is go gently.

robertsloan2
04-12-2011, 12:20 PM
Susan, now that I have a spray bottle I am going to do a test sheet for the spray technique - it'll be good to paint some throwaway trees to get in the habit of not meatballing anyway, I could use the practice. Just do a little quick thing over and over again and try different levels of sprays at different distances to figure out what works best with my sprayer.

Johannes has a lot of practice with it and I suspect different sprayers may have different strengths of stream. My daughter told me if mine isn't strong enough they make an industrial strength one for "fly spraying" horses that's available at the tack shop for a couple of dollars. What they use to spray horses for flies is a mix that can't be stored, so the spray containers are sold clean and empty.

painterted
04-12-2011, 12:48 PM
Robert, I have done it several times with no problem. I had the nozzle on spray held it about 1" away, and really forced the water out. It's a good idea to hold it over the sink.

Nahant
04-12-2011, 02:21 PM
Jonannes, I would like to see you put on a 2 week course on watercolor. I have taken several courses on this subject and know that I wasn't shown the proper basics. You opened my eyes to so much, and I wan't to know more.

ted


What a wonderful idea, Ted! Johannes, you can count on me if you ever do this. Sunday's demo has really inspired me to dig out my watercolor supplies and "brush-up" on my rusty skills. The image you posted on the homework thread was beautiful...I was hoping you would do that :thumbsup: !

Betty

KenBratto
04-12-2011, 02:59 PM
Wet Canvas keeps telling me to post something, when I was younger the teachers told me to be quiet. Maybe that is the difference between education and adult education?

Johannes Instructor
04-12-2011, 03:05 PM
I learned something about the spray bottle last night. I was using it on Arches 300# cold press. There must be a power wash setting on my spray bottle because I blasted the paper. Maybe a little advise from me is go gently.
Well you can regulate the water spray by turning the knob. If you wish to decrease the jet spray just withdraw the bottle futher back

Valerie214
04-12-2011, 03:05 PM
Jonannes, I would like to see you put on a 2 week course on watercolor. I have taken several courses on this subject and know that I wasn't shown the proper basics. You opened my eyes to so much, and I wan't to know more.

ted
I'd take the course on watercolor also. I have not been shown any of the basics either.

Johannes Instructor
04-12-2011, 03:06 PM
Robert, I have done it several times with no problem. I had the nozzle on spray held it about 1" away, and really forced the water out. It's a good idea to hold it over the sink.

That's precisely why you can remove pigment with the spray bottle.

carol_lee
04-12-2011, 11:01 PM
:clap: What a GREAT opportunity!!! a bit far for me :lol: :envy: :envy: :envy:

Valerie214
04-12-2011, 11:28 PM
I just purchased and downloaded the Web Classes, Lessons 1-12
and I already put them on DVDs. - so I won't accidently loose them.
The information that Johannas gave us in these lessons are worth much more than the cost of these downloads. I haven't seen this much information in any book or other DVD.
I think everybody should purchase them for their library - it doesn't cost more than a few books. And I know we all buy many art instruction books!

wetbob
04-13-2011, 02:45 AM
I saw a grass land with clouds quickly coming over it. It was great. Grass very near to me (<1 mtr) looked neon. In the distance it wasn t. When a cloud blocked the light, the grass instantly became a cool brownish green. I m looking forward to plein air demo

mij
04-13-2011, 03:27 AM
I agree with you wholeheartedly. I downloaded them all yesterday with some help from Johannes and hopefully today will burn them to DVD's to preserve them. Maybe even watch them on the big screened tele.
cheers
jim

Stephanie_Draws
04-13-2011, 07:36 AM
Hi Robert, I hope this post is allowed since its an addendum to your notes. It's something that might be of interest to other partcipants too - since we're not all going to paint southwestern landscapes ;) - so I thought I'd share it:

It pertains to the "always put turquoise in blue"-rule for skies from last weekend. Depending on geography (for instance middle and northern Europe as well as other locations further from the equator) the sky simply doesn't have this greenblue undertone and I asked during the session about it. Kenneth and Johannes answered that if, due to location, your sky doesn't have a turquoise undertone to use violet instead. A hint of violet in the skies works for environments where a turquoise-tinted sky would look wrong and fake somehow. I believe that's a helpful information for the whole class, so I risked the "no post"-violation.

Johannes Instructor
04-13-2011, 08:17 AM
Well the other way to see this is if everyone buys at least one recording it will help ensure to continuation of thse classes.

KenBratto
04-14-2011, 02:17 AM
Thanks for sharing your notes Robertsloan2, your efforts are greatly appreciated.

jmcedeno
04-14-2011, 02:59 PM
Hello everyone, the videos are perfect I downloaded classes: 3,4,7,8,11,and 12. Sadly can't burn to DVD because my CD/DVD doesn't work anymore and don't have enough memory in the hard drive and that concerns me because I'm planning to download ALL the classes. I rushed to BestBuy and purchased one of those to connect to a USB port, and guess what?, it didn't work either, they told me that my PC is too old and is not supported by Microsoft and Dell. I do not want to sink anymore $ in it, therefore I'm in the market for a new Desktop Tower. I have a Dell laptop but it doesn't work anymore due to a virus, took it for repair but they can't remove the virus. My concern is that all new PCs come with windows 7 and still I am learning XP. I think I need help making this decision, any suggestion anyone? in the mean time I'm going to google Costco and see what they have that is affordable.

bbuggia
04-14-2011, 03:25 PM
Don't be afraid of windows 7, it isn't like 'vista'. haaha. you shouldn't have any trouble using it.

Johannes Instructor
04-14-2011, 06:05 PM
Hello everyone, the videos are perfect I downloaded classes: 3,4,7,8,11,and 12. Sadly can't burn to DVD because my CD/DVD doesn't work anymore and don't have enough memory in the hard drive and that concerns me because I'm planning to download ALL the classes. I rushed to BestBuy and purchased one of those to connect to a USB port, and guess what?, it didn't work either, they told me that my PC is too old and is not supported by Microsoft and Dell. I do not want to sink anymore $ in it, therefore I'm in the market for a new Desktop Tower. I have a Dell laptop but it doesn't work anymore due to a virus, took it for repair but they can't remove the virus. My concern is that all new PCs come with windows 7 and still I am learning XP. I think I need help making this decision, any suggestion anyone? in the mean time I'm going to google Costco and see what they have that is affordable.

I find it highloy unusual that they say they cannot remove a virus. As fas as I know when you format a hard drive everything is gone. However that probably explains why you don get the live demos because of that computer. What year is it?

Anoella
04-14-2011, 06:23 PM
Jose
My husband Rick and I thought of several options for maybe solving your problem re computer and burning the classes to DVD. But these depend on different pieces of information.

1. Can your computer read any USB Thumb drive (also known as USB pen drives)? If it can then you can buy a couple of 8 GB or four 4 GB USB thumb drives that can run on USB 1 or USB 2. My husband says that most of the old computers used USB 1 to run the ports , the places you stick the USB drives into the computer. He also says that most of the USB drives can read either USB 1 or 2. If you can then you should have enough space to copy at least 1 or 2 of the Johannes's lessons on to the the USB drives then take them into a Office Depot or Staples or another office supply company that burns CDs and DVDs and get them copied on to a DVD. Then you can play them on your new computer or on the Dell if you can get it running.

2. Can't the Company who told you that they can't get rid of the virus on your Dell laptop recover your data then wipe the hard drive and reformat it and re-install everything? Or even replace the hard drive and re-install everything? If so there is one other thing to consider - will/does the DVD burner/player still work on the lap top even if the hard drive can be reformatted or replaced? if so then do not worry.

3. My husband says finally ask yourself this - If It is cheaper not to fix the Dell because you can get a new tower cheaper go for it. Do not worry about System 7 for it seems similar to XP unlike vista which was a pain for many people.

Hope this helps. We have to think about these things because our old machine is starting to run slow.

BumpaBob
04-14-2011, 09:18 PM
Jose:
You could simplify your life and pick up a used iMac or iBook. Then all the Windlass 7 problems are cured!

Aspiring
04-14-2011, 11:31 PM
Johannes,
I didn't hear completely what you said about green, but I thought I heard you say that if you took green out of your painting you would have a harmonious painting? Would you elaborate, please? Thank yoiu.
Jane

Aspiring
04-14-2011, 11:38 PM
To Ledge Hill Studio,
I had to chuckle when you told another student thata OS 7 wasn't like Vista and that person should have no trouble with it. I"ve been using computers since '82 so have had quite an array of os's. Before I got this last one I had XP and we got along just so fine. I needed a new pc and my computer guy ordered it with 7. This was a year ago and I am still fighting with it! LOL Oh, how I wish I had my xp back. I don't need all that 7 offers, and I don'[t need a whole new language.

norskgal
04-15-2011, 01:07 AM
I have purchased all 6 videos. And will be purchasing the rest of the series when they become available. I was pleased to see F&Wmedia follow through. I was not able to view about 1/2 of the sessions live. And will miss the last two this weekend. So when I have the time, I am planning on starting at the beginning and seriously challenging myself to become a better artist.

These are such a bargain! It would seem that everyone that logged in for free for all these last weeks could see the value in purchasing just one @ $8.99 ... if only to make it viable to have this resource available in the future. Just think, over 48 hours of quality instruction for 9 bucks! I have spent hundreds of dollars for week long workshops. For my $54.00, I now have 24 hours that I can view over and over (until I get it right!).

When I stumbled upon the webinars in December, there was a paypal button to contribute a donation. I did kick in a small donation then and would be willing to pay a fee prior to each session if that is what it takes to keep classes available in the future.

Rosemarie
04-15-2011, 01:16 AM
norskgal, I fully agree with you. I have started to watch the videos and find that that is so much information in them that i have missed or forgotten a lot from the classes I was able to attend. The are well worth to buy and rewatch. I bought them at three times and the third time the price was down to 8.09 dollars!!

By the way, are you a norwegian girl??

wetbob
04-15-2011, 02:38 AM
Well the other way to see this is if everyone buys at least one recording it will help ensure to continuation of thse classes.

I think if people learned a lot and have money, they are obliged to buy 1 vid,
WB

nougat
04-15-2011, 03:02 AM
i've purchased all the lessons too, and will get the rest when they are available.

come on guys!! just one video each and we have the chance of more lessons from our friend johannes!!!

Colorix
04-15-2011, 04:43 AM
It pertains to the "always put turquoise in blue"-rule for skies from last weekend. Depending on geography (for instance middle and northern Europe as well as other locations further from the equator) the sky simply doesn't have this greenblue undertone and I asked during the session about it. Kenneth and Johannes answered that if, due to location, your sky doesn't have a turquoise undertone to use violet instead. A hint of violet in the skies works for environments where a turquoise-tinted sky would look wrong and fake somehow. I believe that's a helpful information for the whole class, so I risked the "no post"-violation.

Stephanie, so glad you posted this! The latitude and atmospheric conditions can differ *vastly* over the globe. So observation is the key.

You know how some people tend to laugh at the renaissance painters, who made the distant landscape all blue? Well, that is how it looks there, it is like a blue filter, and the change is abrupt.

In northern Europe, we do not have much of blue going on in the landscape, so to push back trees and mountains I have to fake it.

Skies here shimmer in pink and blue (=violet-ish), and I only see turquoise very rarely at daytime, but bands of it at sunrise or sunset.

Snow in shadow up here is blue, normally. For two weeks in March, it turned very slightly towards the purplish side (probably the right angle of the sun, but then sun went higher in the sky), but the 'normal' shadow colours are blue and turquoise.

We *never* get that white glare coming from all directions on a summer day they do get in the Mediterranean countries.

And so on. Observation is the key. Even the revered Carlson said that the rules for slanting planes like mountains was true for the area *he* lived in, and other mountains elsewhere that were not covered with vegetation would have other values.

bjornjo
04-15-2011, 06:04 AM
Charlie yeah you can understand why so many painters went to venice to see that special light. Eyes is all we can use and try to differ them by hue and saturation and chroma will also be different depending on the atmosphere.

Björn

Johannes Instructor
04-15-2011, 06:45 AM
Johannes,
I didn't hear completely what you said about green, but I thought I heard you say that if you took green out of your painting you would have a harmonious painting? Would you elaborate, please? Thank yoiu.
Jane
Correct. some paintings don't need green if they are winter or falls paintings. If you take green out and work basically with the sienna and ochres you will have instant color haRMONY. We introduce green then we have to fine multiple ways to echo it elsewhere.
Look at colorix's painting
http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=928011&page=11

top post

bbuggia
04-15-2011, 07:01 AM
To Ledge Hill Studio,
I had to chuckle when you told another student thata OS 7 wasn't like Vista and that person should have no trouble with it. I"ve been using computers since '82 so have had quite an array of os's. Before I got this last one I had XP and we got along just so fine. I needed a new pc and my computer guy ordered it with 7. This was a year ago and I am still fighting with it! LOL Oh, how I wish I had my xp back. I don't need all that 7 offers, and I don'[t need a whole new language.

Oooops. Maybe I should withdraw my optimism.

jmcedeno
04-15-2011, 02:12 PM
Jose:
You could simplify your life and pick up a used iMac or iBook. Then all the Windlass 7 problems are cured!

Thank you Bob, that is another option that has been circulating around my brain for some time, when I was practicing architecture I took a course in CAD (Comp. Aided Design) but gave it up due to lack of time, I had a PC with windows 95 and since then always worked with windows (not me personally, my secretary) When I retired in 1992 I began to learn and work with it. To go now with a Mac would be like emigrating to a new country and try to learn a new language. It is my understanding that Windows 7 has been problematic to people upgrading to it, but not much complain when it comes with a new PC, am I wrong?

jmcedeno
04-15-2011, 03:35 PM
Jose
My husband Rick and I thought of several options for maybe solving your problem re computer and burning the classes to DVD. But these depend on different pieces of information.

1. Can your computer read any USB Thumb drive (also known as USB pen drives)? If it can then you can buy a couple of 8 GB or four 4 GB USB thumb drives that can run on USB 1 or USB 2. My husband says that most of the old computers used USB 1 to run the ports , the places you stick the USB drives into the computer. He also says that most of the USB drives can read either USB 1 or 2. If you can then you should have enough space to copy at least 1 or 2 of the Johannes's lessons on to the the USB drives then take them into a Office Depot or Staples or another office supply company that burns CDs and DVDs and get them copied on to a DVD. Then you can play them on your new computer or on the Dell if you can get it running.

2. Can't the Company who told you that they can't get rid of the virus on your Dell laptop recover your data then wipe the hard drive and reformat it and re-install everything? Or even replace the hard drive and re-install everything? If so there is one other thing to consider - will/does the DVD burner/player still work on the lap top even if the hard drive can be reformatted or replaced? if so then do not worry.

3. My husband says finally ask yourself this - If It is cheaper not to fix the Dell because you can get a new tower cheaper go for it. Do not worry about System 7 for it seems similar to XP unlike vista which was a pain for many people.

Hope this helps. We have to think about these things because our old machine is starting to run slow.
Thank you very much for taking the time to answer my question, it is very nice of you to do so I really appreciate it. I apologize for my lack of knowledge on Computer Jargon, I do not know what a USB thumb drive is? I do have one USB port in the front of the tower and a second one does not work. I took the Laptop to BestBuy and they did remove "temporarily" the virus or something else that keeps creeping back to the screen constantly that does not allow me to run windows, can't connect to the Internet, and can't shut down the computer I have to turn it off manually. I called BestBuy and was told that to reformat the hardrive or replace it would cost approx. over $200. NO WAY! I rather get a new one, don't you Think?

jmcedeno
04-15-2011, 04:14 PM
I find it highloy unusual that they say they cannot remove a virus. As fas as I know when you format a hard drive everything is gone. However that probably explains why you don get the live demos because of that computer. What year is it?

Johannes, thank you for your answer. My Laptop is a Dell Inspiron, I purchased it in 2004 and ever since I have had lots of problems with it had to call Technical Support many times while it was still under warranty. I might had misspoken when I said it was a virus for lack of another word. Some time ago I downloaded a program by Sony to burn DVDs and it was a headache so I removed it (and so I thought) It refuses to be removed and keep creeping back the moment I boot the PC, it doesn't allow me to burn CD/DVD, nor to connect to the Internet, and can't shut it down, I have to do it manually. I took it to BestBuy the technician worked on it and said that he had removed it, brought it home and work OK for few days but then the problem reappeared, so I called BestBuy and asked if they could reformat the hard drive or replace it, and they gave a bid of approx. $200 plus. I think it is not worth it to spend more money on this I rather try to get a new one. Costco has a sale on a HP laptop with all the whistles for less than $600. My plan is to get a Laptop then transfer the hard drive contents from the Desktop and get rid of both.

claude j greengrass
04-15-2011, 05:41 PM
...To go now with a Mac would be like emigrating to a new country and try to learn a new language. It is my understanding that Windows 7 has been problematic to people upgrading to it, but not much complain when it comes with a new PC, am I wrong?
You're right! My job forced me to use a PC since the days of MS-Dos 3.x and Windows 2.0 and I've suffered ever 'upgrade' and migration including Vista and Win7. IMOSHO the Win7 represents the greatest difference in User Interface design from previous versions, though XP->Vista was a major pain and ran like a dog.

If you are going to switch OS, consider Linux. At least you can change the User Interface if you don't like the one you have. In fact you can even 'buy' a pre-packaged on that looks like your favorite version of the Mac or Windows! YMMV

claude j greengrass
04-15-2011, 05:56 PM
Thank you very much for taking the time to answer my question, it is very nice of you to do so I really appreciate it. I apologize for my lack of knowledge on Computer Jargon, I do not know what a USB thumb drive is? USB: Universal Serial Bus, and a USB thumb drive, is disk drive which conforms to the USB standard. Every USB 'thumb' drive I've seen is solid state. i.e. silcon memory and designed to behave, from the computers point of view, just like a spinning disk hard drive. The thumb part comes from the fact that they are about the size of a thumb of a person with tiny hands. My thumbs are about 5x the size of a common garden variety USB thumb drive. I do have one USB port in the front of the tower and a second one does not work. I took the Laptop to BestBuy and they did remove &quot;temporarily&quot; the virus or something else that keeps creeping back to the screen constantly that does not allow me to run windows, can't connect to the Internet, and can't shut down the computer I have to turn it off manually. I called BestBuy and was told that to reformat the hardrive or replace it would cost approx. over $200. NO WAY! I rather get a new one, don't you Think? Keep buying MS products. It keeps a lot of Cyber Criminals and other low life gainfully employed not mention supporting the entire anti-virus industry.

surob
04-15-2011, 06:24 PM
The biggest lesson I have learned so far is..........if I were easily discouraged I would quit. The second is that you have to go through the ugly phase and get through it. Third you have to figure out when to stop. Maybe with practice I will be able to put it all together and produce some quality paintings.

BumpaBob
04-15-2011, 07:06 PM
Thank you Bob, that is another option that has been circulating around my brain for some time, when I was practicing architecture I took a course in CAD (Comp. Aided Design) but gave it up due to lack of time, I had a PC with windows 95 and since then always worked with windows (not me personally, my secretary) When I retired in 1992 I began to learn and work with it. To go now with a Mac would be like emigrating to a new country and try to learn a new language. It is my understanding that Windows 7 has been problematic to people upgrading to it, but not much complain when it comes with a new PC, am I wrong?

Hi Jose:
Well, unless you are learning programming language, you will speak Mac very easily. In fact, the whole windows concept came from Mac and still use it. The internet is so much easier to get around, virus issues are at a minimum, keeping cookies, pop ups and other interrupting items away are so easy, and the OSX is just easy to look at. Of course, iTunes, dvd's and movies, iPhoto, and the rest of the iLife series come with such easy to use features that you will wonder why you didn't switch years ago!
You'll find the greatest difference in the availability of third party programs, many of which are built up on Windows XP or 7; I use a lot of ham radio programs on a couple of left over Win XP powered pc's I got for next to nothing, but I keep them off the internet. As a beast of burden, the pc does shine. Many of the ham programs are free, but those made for the Mac can cost some bucks.
You mentioned Best Buy; most of the stores around Mass. have an Apple department, with qualified rep. standing in. You can pepper him/her with questions, and find out that the newest Mac's can run both OSX and Win 7 or XP in fact better than most pc's do! The price is the issue, with a good laptop or iMac running around $1200-1600. That's why I picked up a used iBook, and our desk top is a 12 year old iMac that is still crankin' on.
But that's just my opinion.......I might be wrong.......bob.c

BumpaBob
04-15-2011, 07:08 PM
Sorry for hijacking the thread!! I'm done, but I love my Mac's! bob.c

rmincklerca
04-15-2011, 08:43 PM
Thank you very much for taking the time to answer my question, it is very nice of you to do so I really appreciate it. I apologize for my lack of knowledge on Computer Jargon, I do not know what a USB thumb drive is? I do have one USB port in the front of the tower and a second one does not work. I took the Laptop to BestBuy and they did remove "temporarily" the virus or something else that keeps creeping back to the screen constantly that does not allow me to run windows, can't connect to the Internet, and can't shut down the computer I have to turn it off manually. I called BestBuy and was told that to reformat the hardrive or replace it would cost approx. over $200. NO WAY! I rather get a new one, don't you Think?

Hi Jose

I am Anoella's husband. Thanks for the reply and hey do not feel you have to apologize. When I was taking some courses at university when I went back to get update on all of this computer stuff in my 40s so I could teach basic word processing and PowerPoint I felt a wee bit slow 'cause the 19 and 20 year olds were using such crazy computerese words that that I had to run to catch up. Now I get to teach older colleagues and 14 year olds. The important thing is to keep the little gray cells working and keep on learning. We stay young whenn we do it. Now this is a pix of a USB Drive also known as a Flash drive or thumb drive or a pen drive.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Apr-2011/107184-USB_drive_.jpgYou can google these and check out other images online. They are the new floppy disks and are so small but you can cram even Johannes's DVDs on some of them if you can afford them. Some are 16 GB (Large) but still small enough to put into a shirt pocket or a small change pocket on a pair of jeans.

Get a laptop withthe biggest hard drive and memory with a DVD Burner and with as many USB ports that you can afford for $600. The only problem with Costco is that they usually do not have the service support the way that BestBusy does with their Geek Squad. If you get it from one of the computer retailers try to get the service.. Up here in Britsh Columbia just North of Washington State our local Best Buy is advertising a Toshiba Laptop for $379 3 GB of memory and a 350 GB hard drive. You might be able to get a similar deal near your house and get them to put your data files on it as part of a package.

sannew
04-16-2011, 09:38 AM
When negative painting is used, try not to follow the contour of what is in front of it.

Thank you, Johannes. I will be missing today's lesson.....and I don't like that, ha ha. If you have any other pointers to give me, I would really appreciate it.

Thank you.

Eddypus1
04-16-2011, 09:53 AM
Stephanie, so glad you posted this! The latitude and atmospheric conditions can differ *vastly* over the globe. So observation is the key.

You know how some people tend to laugh at the renaissance painters, who made the distant landscape all blue? Well, that is how it looks there, it is like a blue filter, and the change is abrupt.

In northern Europe, we do not have much of blue going on in the landscape, so to push back trees and mountains I have to fake it.

Skies here shimmer in pink and blue (=violet-ish), and I only see turquoise very rarely at daytime, but bands of it at sunrise or sunset.

Snow in shadow up here is blue, normally. For two weeks in March, it turned very slightly towards the purplish side (probably the right angle of the sun, but then sun went higher in the sky), but the 'normal' shadow colours are blue and turquoise.

We *never* get that white glare coming from all directions on a summer day they do get in the Mediterranean countries.

And so on. Observation is the key. Even the revered Carlson said that the rules for slanting planes like mountains was true for the area *he* lived in, and other mountains elsewhere that were not covered with vegetation would have other values.

This is very interesting, but can you clarify this? I, too live in the north and in winter shadows in the snow are cobalt blue. If in this part of the world I observe this in nature, do I fake the colors and still add a violet tinge in my painting?

nougat
04-16-2011, 11:18 AM
i'm in the mediterranean and would really like to understand this cos i don't!!!

the skies here can be blue or turquoise...as well as an aray of yellow, orange, pink when the sun is low.

Colorix
04-16-2011, 02:31 PM
Eddypus and nougat, I'm saying there is a balance between what we do see, and what we put down on paper or canvas. What is a good solid 'rule' in one part of the world may not apply to another part of the world. So we may not be able to actually see (in our countries) what a rule from another country states. We can still use it in paintings, what I called 'fake it'.

So, Eddypus, if you *want* the snow in your painting to have violet in it, you can add it. If it becomes a better painting if you add violet, go for it! I just meant that if you and I always only see cobalt blue, then it isn't a 'rule' that snow turns red-violet in shadow at certain times of the day. We can still paint it red-violet.

Nougat, you're way down south, from me, and you're lucky to have all those beautiful colours in the sky! But if I were to paint that kind of sky over a seascape from Stockholm, people would say it looks un-natural, I'd have to paint a distinct mediterranean scene for such a sky to work. In August, do you ever see that blinding white light in the middle of the day, when the air is so hot and humid it is nearly as if it was fog? (Or are you too close to the dry air of nothern Africa?) In Greece, Italy, and Spain, I've experienced that white light. And also the beautiful colours you mention, on other days, and other hours.

My point was mainly that light and the colour of it varies a lot. It is good to know what is 'normal' where you are, and it is good to know what you can do with it in a painting.

And if I still am unclear, please do ask, and I'll try better.

JFountain
04-16-2011, 02:53 PM
As are class comes to an end I just want to say thank you Johannes for the experience and value your class has taught me. Also to all my fellow students happy painting I know I will be. Great class with great people thanks. Jermel Fountain

Rosemarie
04-16-2011, 03:01 PM
Well put, Charlie!

jillmc3
04-16-2011, 03:02 PM
As are class comes to an end I just want to say thank you Johannes for the experience and value your class has taught me. Also to all my fellow students happy painting I know I will be. Great class with great people thanks. Jermel Fountain


Same here! These classes have been fantastic and I can't thank you enough, Johannes. As a teacher, I know how much work goes in behind the scenes, and it is very much appreciated. Thanks a Billion!:heart:

rmincklerca
04-16-2011, 03:15 PM
Eddypus and nougat, I'm saying there is a balance between what we do see, and what we put down on paper or canvas. What is a good solid 'rule' in one part of the world may not apply to another part of the world. So we may not be able to actually see (in our countries) what a rule from another country states. We can still use it in paintings, what I called 'fake it'.

So, Eddypus, if you *want* the snow in your painting to have violet in it, you can add it. If it becomes a better painting if you add violet, go for it! I just meant that if you and I always only see cobalt blue, then it isn't a 'rule' that snow turns red-violet in shadow at certain times of the day. We can still paint it red-violet.

Nougat, you're way down south, from me, and you're lucky to have all those beautiful colours in the sky! But if I were to paint that kind of sky over a seascape from Stockholm, people would say it looks un-natural, I'd have to paint a distinct mediterranean scene for such a sky to work. In August, do you ever see that blinding white light in the middle of the day, when the air is so hot and humid it is nearly as if it was fog? (Or are you too close to the dry air of nothern Africa?) In Greece, Italy, and Spain, I've experienced that white light. And also the beautiful colours you mention, on other days, and other hours.

My point was mainly that light and the colour of it varies a lot. It is good to know what is 'normal' where you are, and it is good to know what you can do with it in a painting.

And if I still am unclear, please do ask, and I'll try better.

I agree with everyone's observations and Colorix's in particular. Travelogues on the TV or Pix on various web sites of skies in various parts of the world do show that the sky is different on different days of different seasons of the year and different times of the day. Sea coast skies of cities like Stockholm, Sweden; Rotterdam, Netherlands and Le Havre, France in Europe have a luminescence and a cobalt blue that varies while the Pacific coast cities from Alaska to British Columbia to Washington to Oregon to California to Baja all have different skies. At the Vancouver Art Gallery in BC, Canada, there was a showing of the Dutch masters from Rembrandt to Vermeer about a year or so ago. Attendees to the exhibits were able view a video about the air in Netherlands and how it has such a high moisture content that the blueness and luminosity of the air is affected and how the Masters were able to use this at different times of the day and seasons to produce the cobalt blue of their paintings. This was was in contrast to the color of the sky in the paintings of artists who painted in the tropics where their skies were a warmer blue from the sun and different air. Just look at the travel brochures for the Caribbean.

To paraphrase Johannes and colorix above do what you want to achieve the effect that you want. After all the painting is not reality but visual poem to affect the viewer.

levans1761
04-16-2011, 03:31 PM
these classes have been great I want to purchase last weeks class for sure that is week 11 I would love more and even though the price is good when You start to add on a few it gets expensive. This has been a real learning experience I do not go to wet canvas often enough I wish you could get email like I do with other groups

levans1761
04-16-2011, 03:48 PM
You are the best

eslart
04-16-2011, 03:54 PM
Johannes....I want to thank you so much for all the lessons you have given in this 12 week course. There was so much information I wished I had had several years ago. You are an excellent teacher.....and I look forward to more of them in the future. Thanks again.
El

Tresgatos
04-16-2011, 04:11 PM
Johannes,

Could you please demo the technique of wet into wet for the background where it creates the fade out. I did do my background wet into wet and still manage to get a hard line - how do I fade out some of that hard line?

Thank you.

Barbara

etdavis6
04-16-2011, 06:35 PM
Johannes, Ken, & Robert,

Thanks for making this such a great class! I've enjoyed it and also learned lots.
And, I just finished purchasing some of the video downloads. Will purchase some of the later ones, too, when they become available.

Cheers,
Beth

winecountry
04-16-2011, 06:41 PM
thanks Johannes and Ken too what and amazing class and all the sessions were so valuable...hope F and W finds a way to keep this going...

special thanks to Robert for impeccable notes and illustrations, he should publish it as a book!

robertsloan2
04-16-2011, 06:52 PM
Johannes, thank you! Today's class was enlightening and wonderful. Thank you so much for today's handout too - it is a check list I will refer to and plan with the night before every plein air outing especially if I leave the house, and maybe print out to bring with me. But some of it's for planning.

Not to wear colorful clothing. It's so obvious once said. It's so likely if I didn't think about it. One of my favorite t-shirts is bright red, another is orange. I even noticed the orange reflecting a lovely peach color on some white ceramic objects on a white shelf with very blue shadows one day and thought, it'd be cool to wear a particular color to reflect color into a still life.

But not into my palette! Duh!

I have a favorite gray one too that Sakura gave me for reviewing all their oil pastels, that's what to wear when I go outdoors to paint. Like the Gray Matters palette, it'll make everything around me easier to see.

That little gem is platinum! How many of us think about what to wear as part of the painting process? Other than maybe a printer's apron to keep the oil paint off of shirts and jeans? Someone should produce those in gray as well as dark blue, cream and black. Gray art smocks or printer's aprons would rock.

Johannes Instructor
04-16-2011, 07:01 PM
Johannes,

Could you please demo the technique of wet into wet for the background where it creates the fade out. I did do my background wet into wet and still manage to get a hard line - how do I fade out some of that hard line?

Thank you.

Barbara
Here is a PDF tutorial that I put together.

Johannes Instructor
04-16-2011, 07:02 PM
My server is blocking me from sending out bulk email. I will be able to in a few days though. So I am letting you know here. I will meet you all in the "Go to Webinar" room tomorrow Sunday.

robertsloan2
04-16-2011, 07:28 PM
Eddypus and nougat, I'm saying there is a balance between what we do see, and what we put down on paper or canvas. What is a good solid 'rule' in one part of the world may not apply to another part of the world. So we may not be able to actually see (in our countries) what a rule from another country states. We can still use it in paintings, what I called 'fake it'.

So, Eddypus, if you *want* the snow in your painting to have violet in it, you can add it. If it becomes a better painting if you add violet, go for it! I just meant that if you and I always only see cobalt blue, then it isn't a 'rule' that snow turns red-violet in shadow at certain times of the day. We can still paint it red-violet.

Nougat, you're way down south, from me, and you're lucky to have all those beautiful colours in the sky! But if I were to paint that kind of sky over a seascape from Stockholm, people would say it looks un-natural, I'd have to paint a distinct mediterranean scene for such a sky to work. In August, do you ever see that blinding white light in the middle of the day, when the air is so hot and humid it is nearly as if it was fog? (Or are you too close to the dry air of nothern Africa?) In Greece, Italy, and Spain, I've experienced that white light. And also the beautiful colours you mention, on other days, and other hours.

My point was mainly that light and the colour of it varies a lot. It is good to know what is 'normal' where you are, and it is good to know what you can do with it in a painting.

And if I still am unclear, please do ask, and I'll try better.

Charlie, thank you! I think when Johannes made the point about enhancing subtle color shifts that are real, that covers exactly what you're talking about - including the color of the light.

It blew me away when I first moved from Midwestern Illinois and Minnesota down to New Orleans. It was as if the world had just turned technicolor, like the change in the movie The Wizard of Oz. Some of why I'm fascinated by greens is the change in the greens from Illinois summers to New Orleans all year round - it took being there a few years to get used to the seasonal changes down there. The light was different. That changed the hues of everything else.

It was in New Orleans where the sky color was much stronger that I first recognized it was lighter at the horizon too. So these rules are great for the places that they work for and for painting a place, getting the identity of the place, paying attention to those shifts and slightly exaggerating them might give a truer image of the place, the season and time of day.

I can see how Johannes and others use the "golden hour" colors to brighten up otherwise gray mountains and monotonous green trees - and at the same time how much observing nature and then enhancing what makes that time, that place, that season true so that increased chroma takes the place of the literal brightness of highlight sides of things.

Arkansas is more colourful than Illinois or Kansas, but not as brilliant as New Orleans. New Orleans had a different colour cast than the trips I made out to the Southwest as a kid - very vivid in memory. The dust in the air did things to the light too.

When I spent a year in Colorado, the winter days were very short but a pink cast was there on the clouds a lot of the time even around noon - it was visible, the orange-pink highlights, there weren't really white clouds in the gray-white Midwestern cloud colors range. They look better. A lot of Western paintings are about the Big Sky, and I saw that in Colorado along with cloud types and formations caused by the mountains that I don't see here.

One really weird thing that happens here is that more than half the time, always when it's overcast or raining or about to rain, the horizon facing my window is darker and bluish shading to lighter, either light pearl gray overcast or fading out to blue sky when it's clear overhead and a storm is coming. It's spooky. It's the only place I've lived where it happens but sometime I will paint it just because it's such a spooky eerie look - especially on an overcast day, doing that light will be a lot of fun for a mood painting.

robertsloan2
04-16-2011, 07:33 PM
Johannes, thank you so much for the watercolor tutorial! My watercolors have already improved dramatically from the course, this is going to help me so much. I'm still nowhere near as good in it as I am with pastels and your techniques are so masterful.

Your photos in the tutorial are exquisite. I've tried all those techniques and I'm past the point of doing everything in a painting wet on dry or dry-brushed (which does work out all right in pen and watercolor realism, but even that gets enhanced when the pen work intersects interesting wet in wet passages). I'll admit, I was trying to master watercolor because it's got less cleanup than anything else.

For me that's practical, there are days I could not paint if I didn't have the least messy medium at hand. But you're right - that does not begin to use its full potential. I suspect that mixing watercolor techniques with gouache will improve my gouache techniques as well.

jmcedeno
04-16-2011, 10:07 PM
Johannes, I hate to think that this is coming to an end tomorrow, I'll be lost without your classes you are not only a superb teacher but an entertainer as well, to listen to your lecture is a joy and that is precisely why I can't miss a thing you are saying for almost three hours, then go over Robert's notes to reaffirm what I learned in class, how could I ever thank him for taking the time to do such marvelous notes. May God Bless you for such demonstration of unselfishness in providing us with the tools necessary to be better landscape
painters. Through the years I have taken numerous very expensive workshops with so called "top artists" and not a single one can compare to your teaching methods. I already got six classes and will get more when they become available. Yes, I can watch the videos many times but it won't be as good as listening to you live. I hope you could find a way to continue teaching us techniques in Oil, Pastel, and Watercolor applied to the landscape. Your idea of doing workshops online for a fee, is a very good one, I'm all for it. I'd like to suggest that you could do critiques for a fee, also. I'm subscribed to the newsletter so I'll keep up todate with your website. Kenny you have been a great contributor to this effort, so Kudos to you. Johannes, THANK YOU....THANK YOU, soooooooo MUCH.