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winecountry
04-03-2011, 06:58 PM
hope it's ok to start this here, Johannes gave a really important tip after most of the group had left. I did a painting today instead of notes to remind me of all the many things he shared. In it you can see some of it
scrub in thin the block in colors
create lots of planes with value and color shifts.
tree trunks not like poles
load one side of the tree heavier than the other
branches going to the numbers of the clock
how to do reflections in water
use cad orange for sun in a misty sky to keep it from going green( my fav)

and the last one the really important thing, which I made a big deal of here and over did it so I could remember...when planes change make the edge hard so things don't mush together, like he read my mind I was trying to figure this out... Most people did not hear this at the very end of the overtime chat.

in the little sketch here look at the bush at the end of the tree island where it meets the background trees, a simple color value change did not separate it but the hard edge did...

This is not a perfect example of all he showed, just my way of remembering it, maybe he will post his.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/03-Apr-2011/103030-class_exercise_4_3_11_4282.jpg

jfwalton
04-03-2011, 07:14 PM
Today I heard someone say they wanted to Gesso over all their old paintings. I know you can't Gesso over oil unless you use the oil base Gesso but could you spray with retouch varnish and start painting over it in oils?:thumbsup:

Quote: No mistakes, only lessons!

winecountry
04-03-2011, 07:19 PM
I've put a thin layer of lead white over or you could use titanium don't need retouch thats to get the colors right....it's not perfect but good enough to practice...it's harder than a clean canvas so use thicker paint and turn upside down so you don't unconsciously follow what you did before. I put a drier in my white layer to get it to get hard faster....not archival but like I said good enough to practice

sherrysherman
04-03-2011, 07:41 PM
I think it was smart of you to start the thread, Colleen! It seems to take Johannes a day to do it, and in the meantime, people are posting all over.

Thought it would be helpful to post the page with his ref photos. The one he did today (and he said to do homework like the little vignette he did; I think he even said base it on his painting) is the LAST one on the page.

Winter trees here:
http://cyberartlearning.com/winter-trees.html

Lin Frye
04-03-2011, 08:00 PM
Thank you Johannes for a superb demo! WOWOW ! SO much to adbsorb!

AND ...

Whatever you did, or perhaps the gods and goddesses of the Internet world finally shined on my part of the US, the transmission was perfect!!!

THANK YOU ALL!

Lin

sherrysherman
04-03-2011, 08:35 PM
Thanks for the reminder, Lin, to convey GOOD reports to Johannes.

For me, this was the best demo transmission since back at Justintv (which I know kept bumping people off when their countries got too full :eek: ). I had a couple of very short freezes, but mostly it was smooth sailing all the way.

Completely wonderful to be able to watch Johannes put into practice all the theory, do's and don'ts, tips and nuggets he's been conveying. Even though I don't use oils, the principles are so applicable in any medium.

Yes, it would be nice to see his paintings, all the strokes, accurate colors and values, in real life-- but it's hard to get a better seat for the demos!! :) (Gee, you think if I were at a demo with 15-20 other people, he'd let me come up and peek over his shoulder from a foot away while he painted??) :wink2:

Johannes Instructor
04-03-2011, 08:43 PM
The Webinair and Stickham video sessions have been working perfectly for me. I wanted to let you know that I went into private chat with a few of the people in the Stickham session who were commenting that they were not able to see the streaming video properly. One thing several had in common was Satellite connection. I know from experience that it may be faster than dial up, but it doesnít hold a candle to DSL or Cable in most cases. (My daughter has it. She lives in the country near Hanover, ON.)

I sent them to http://www.speedtest.net/ to run a test to see what their true download connection speed was. (You donít often get what the ISP promises). The ones that went and reported back, were getting terrible download speeds. My download speed while watching your presentation was 5.89 Mbps . (right now itís 6.36 Mbps) Iím on Bell (DSL).
The numbers people were sending back to me looked like this: 0.06 Mbps. No wonder they canít get streaming video. I can assure you that it is not at your end or in any way under your control.

Just thought you should know that.
Thank you again for your wonderful instruction. I canít tell you how much Iím getting out of this. Iím surely looking at paintings in a whole new way, both mine and others. I wish I had this info years ago.

Regards

Deb

oCDs01-711
04-03-2011, 08:57 PM
Every demo and lecture just gets better and better, so I can't say I have a favorite.:D How did Johannes keep calm repeating and repeating how to enter with so many viewers coming in at the last minute????????

Today's class demonstrated that this guy is an A R T I S T.;) He is comfortable sharing little known techniques with others. So many of us have said that we have taken classes with other artists and have NOT been told many tips :( that he's given us! These "tips" are basic and should have been taught to us!

My video reception was perfect.

:grouphug: :grouphug: :grouphug: A huge THANKS to Johannes :clap: for his sincere effort to pass along his artistic knowledge to others (that's a professional!); a huge THANKS to Robert :clap: for his fantastic notes; and a huge THANKS to Kenneth :clap: and Judy! :clap:

Johannes Instructor
04-03-2011, 09:54 PM
Ok lets make a pact. If any of you do not receive an email by 1 PM EDT every Saturday and Sunday until April 17 you send me an email mentioning you have not received my email. It seems that a minute amount of you did not make it to the video demo today. The idea is no artist left behind. This is the best I can do.
email me at
[email protected]

gardenart
04-03-2011, 10:23 PM
Perfect transmissions today,great techniques and secrets shared. Excellent, excellent. Thanks so much.
Sue

etdavis6
04-03-2011, 10:32 PM
Really great demo today:thumbsup: My transmission was perfect -- no lost sound or video.:clap: (The only time I've had trouble with the transmission was the one a couple of weeks ago.)
Thanks so much Johannes, Ken, Judy, and Robert!!!:wave:

carol_lee
04-04-2011, 12:17 AM
Had no problem with Stickham... best of the 3 you have tried... I am not from US or UK... much further out....Israel.... of course it was late at night here... I am on cable....Great lesson last evening Thanks Johannes,Kenneth,Judy and all the team!!!! Thanks to Robert for those notes.... don't know how you manage them...
Sad to think this is almost over....:(

cranbrook
04-04-2011, 12:57 AM
I just had to let you know how much I enjoyed the demo today. There is so much to learn and I certainly appreciate all of your art tips. Thank you.

mike2007
04-04-2011, 02:03 AM
Absolutely wonderful! Had a little problem right at the beginning, everything froze. I re entered and everything went great from there on in.
Love what you are teaching us, Jo, and fortunately, I have only missed one weekend. Will be missing next week too, ill catch up on them with the recordings.
I must thank Robert for his dilligence with the notes. Hope his hands have stopped shaking. If the fact that we love what he does helps, then he should be OK now. I would love to hear more of how he did the scumbling with the Inktense as it would be beneficial for me.
Thanks to Ken and Judy also.
When I think we are getting all of this for free, I get a little upset when I hear people complaining. Mmmm! Maybe you could give them their money back so they could leave...

N.Ramchandran
04-04-2011, 03:03 AM
The DEMO was FANTASTITIC, to say the least.
The most impressive was the way he painted later the trees with part foliage and the log with snow.
It was a pleasure to watch him, I would say conjure up these things!

Words are not enough to thank him for the wonderful Tip & Nuggests.

I personaly would miss him after April 17.

marionh
04-04-2011, 03:34 AM
I personaly would miss him after April 17.

I agree. I might have to start talking to my husband again on Saturday and Sunday evenings.:lol:

pat-trew
04-04-2011, 12:21 PM
I think it was smart of you to start the thread, Colleen! It seems to take Johannes a day to do it, and in the meantime, people are posting all over.

Thought it would be helpful to post the page with his ref photos. The one he did today (and he said to do homework like the little vignette he did; I think he even said base it on his painting) is the LAST one on the page.

Winter trees here:
http://cyberartlearning.com/winter-trees.html (http://cyberartlearning.com/winter-trees.html)

SHERRY, IT IS FUNNY HOW WE ALL HEAR DIFFERENTLY, I THOUGHT HE SAID OH GO AHEAD AND CHOOSE ONE FROM THE LIST OF PICTURES. BUT IF HE DOES WANT US TO DO THE PICTURE HE DID, LET ME KNOW, I CHOSE THE ONE WITH THE RIVER AND THE TINY DUCK. THANK YOU PAT TREWERN

elsie50
04-04-2011, 12:37 PM
Apart from one small gliche, I am in the UK, the first one since I started the Webinars (I am afraid I missed the first 3) this was another excellent Webinar,Johannes, thank you so much, and you must have the patience of a saint... the sign of a good teacher..

sherrysherman
04-04-2011, 12:44 PM
SHERRY, IT IS FUNNY HOW WE ALL HEAR DIFFERENTLY, I THOUGHT HE SAID OH GO AHEAD AND CHOOSE ONE FROM THE LIST OF PICTURES. BUT IF HE DOES WANT US TO DO THE PICTURE HE DID, LET ME KNOW, I CHOSE THE ONE WITH THE RIVER AND THE TINY DUCK. THANK YOU PAT TREWERN
Pat, he was pretty vague. At first I thought he said just paint one of the pictures, then he said something that sounded like copy his. I would say, paint whichever you want. (Or even paint from your own reference of winter trees massed in a background and in a middle ground.) It's all about practicing doing it yourself.

If he has a specific desire to have you copy his, I'm sure he'll post it. :)

springcleaner
04-04-2011, 02:19 PM
Robert, thank you so much for your great note taking ability. Truly a great
gift and I mean that. so well organized. :clap: :clap: :clap:

Lin Frye
04-04-2011, 02:21 PM
DITTO!!!!!!!!!!!!! Robert -- thank you too!

Johannes Instructor
04-04-2011, 02:32 PM
Pat, he was pretty vague. At first I thought he said just paint one of the pictures, then he said something that sounded like copy his. I would say, paint whichever you want. (Or even paint from your own reference of winter trees massed in a background and in a middle ground.) It's all about practicing doing it yourself.

If he has a specific desire to have you copy his, I'm sure he'll post it. :)

I just want to see you do winter trees. It doesn't matter from what reference you take them.

little miss sunshine
04-04-2011, 02:35 PM
Thanks to Ken and Judy also.

When I think we are getting all of this for free, I get a little upset when I hear people complaining. Mmmm! Maybe you could give them their money back so they could leave...

My sentiments exactly.

TerryKrysak
04-04-2011, 04:44 PM
REGARDING COPYRIGHT

First let me state that I am not a Lawyer, and nothing that I say should be considered Legal Advice. If you require Legal Advice, you should contact a Competent Lawyer.

Using photographs from the Internet, Magazines, or other methods to create artwork may be COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT period.

There are exceptions to this of course!! But these exceptions such as Public Domain, Creative Commons differ from country to country which depends on the individual country of origin and their Copyright Laws. The UK and Canada have different time periods upon which a copyrighted item expires after the death of the author. You MUST be aware of these issues.

Exceptions include the Wetcanvas photo Library where we post photos, and relinquish our copyright rights by posting to that folder. You can use the photos as you wish to create artistic derivative works, without "attribution".

One other exception is the FLICKR Creative Commons http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/ that allows you to use a photograph, as long as you "attribute" the original photagrapher in your description of your "derivative" work from the "original" photograph. An example would be My Painting of Blah,Blah, based on the photograph by Blah, Blah.

In 2008, a Canadian Watercolor Artist who won the award for the AWS Gold Award, lost her award and had to pay back her cash award. http://makingamark.blogspot.com/2008/09/statement-on-aws-gold-medal-controversy.html, Because her "derivative" work was based upon two photographs on Shutterstock. The Shutterstock photographers screamed copyright infringement, because they were not contacted with a request to "USE" the photographs for a "derivative" work of art. As a result of this incident, many art competetions have insisted that you must "OWN" the Copyright to any photos that you use in your "Derivative" Works.

The solution to this issue is OF COURSE to ALWAYS use your own photos for your artwork.

Why should you listen to me????? I was a Buyer for the City of North Vancouver, and have 19 years of experience with dealing with Copyright Issues and Contract Law in the normal course of business.

Please do a Google search on Art Copyright to educate yourself on this matter if you need more information.
Best Regards
Terry

Johannes Instructor
04-04-2011, 07:03 PM
REGARDING COPYRIGHT

First let me state that I am not a Lawyer, and nothing that I say should be considered Legal Advice. If you require Legal Advice, you should contact a Competent Lawyer.

Using photographs from the Internet, Magazines, or other methods to create artwork may be COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT period.

There are exceptions to this of course!! But these exceptions such as Public Domain, Creative Commons differ from country to country which depends on the individual country of origin and their Copyright Laws. The UK and Canada have different time periods upon which a copyrighted item expires after the death of the author. You MUST be aware of these issues.

Exceptions include the Wetcanvas photo Library where we post photos, and relinquish our copyright rights by posting to that folder. You can use the photos as you wish to create artistic derivative works, without "attribution".

One other exception is the FLICKR Creative Commons http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/ that allows you to use a photograph, as long as you "attribute" the original photagrapher in your description of your "derivative" work from the "original" photograph. An example would be My Painting of Blah,Blah, based on the photograph by Blah, Blah.

In 2008, a Canadian Watercolor Artist who won the award for the AWS Gold Award, lost her award and had to pay back her cash award. http://makingamark.blogspot.com/2008/09/statement-on-aws-gold-medal-controversy.html, Because her "derivative" work was based upon two photographs on Shutterstock. The Shutterstock photographers screamed copyright infringement, because they were not contacted with a request to "USE" the photographs for a "derivative" work of art. As a result of this incident, many art competetions have insisted that you must "OWN" the Copyright to any photos that you use in your "Derivative" Works.

The solution to this issue is OF COURSE to ALWAYS use your own photos for your artwork.

Why should you listen to me????? I was a Buyer for the City of North Vancouver, and have 19 years of experience with dealing with Copyright Issues and Contract Law in the normal course of business.

Please do a Google search on Art Copyright to educate yourself on this matter if you need more information.
Best Regards
Terry

No one owns the rights to a landscape scene.I emphasize "landscape". If I see a photo from someone let's say taken at Peggy's Cove on the internet and I use that photo for ideas to do a painting. That is not copyright infringment. Nobody owns the rights to a landscape scene, only his photo. Thousands of people take photos in National parks. Now in my course I have insisted to that you make your own version of a photo not to copy it but to use it to gain ideas. Ideas cannot be copyrighted only works and photos. I feel you should not limit yourselves to do a painting just because someone took a picture of a scene that so many others have taken of, such as scenes at national parks but you happened not to be there. When I am done with my painting after cropping, changing values, stretching things, changing colors, etc it would be very different than the photo. One thing is a work derived from a photo another is a work inspired on a photo.
Of course it would be up to a judge to determine this but to limit yourself from doing a painting that you are doing for yourself is going to far. To mass produce that painting if it is derived from a photo is another issue.

Dana Design
04-04-2011, 07:20 PM
In 2008, a Canadian Watercolor Artist who won the award for the AWS Gold Award, lost her award and had to pay back her cash award. http://makingamark.blogspot.com/2008...ntroversy.html, Because her "derivative" work was based upon two photographs on Shutterstock. The Shutterstock photographers screamed copyright infringement, because they were not contacted with a request to "USE" the photographs for a "derivative" work of art. As a result of this incident, many art competetions have insisted that you must "OWN" the Copyright to any photos that you use in your "Derivative" Works.

That was a very different issue/matter and perhaps more research is suggested before you use that as your example.

Dougwas
04-04-2011, 11:29 PM
I don't know if it is legal, but I find it very unethical. Just my thoughts.

Doug

wetbob
04-05-2011, 03:22 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryKrysak
REGARDING COPYRIGHT

First let me state that I am not a Lawyer, and nothing that I say should be considered Legal Advice. If you require Legal Advice, you should contact a Competent Lawyer.

Using photographs from the Internet, Magazines, or other methods to create artwork may be COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT period.

There are exceptions to this of course!! But these exceptions such as Public Domain, Creative Commons differ from country to country which depends on the individual country of origin and their Copyright Laws. The UK and Canada have different time periods upon which a copyrighted item expires after the death of the author. You MUST be aware of these issues.

Exceptions include the Wetcanvas photo Library where we post photos, and relinquish our copyright rights by posting to that folder. You can use the photos as you wish to create artistic derivative works, without "attribution".

One other exception is the FLICKR Creative Commons http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/ that allows you to use a photograph, as long as you "attribute" the original photagrapher in your description of your "derivative" work from the "original" photograph. An example would be My Painting of Blah,Blah, based on the photograph by Blah, Blah.

In 2008, a Canadian Watercolor Artist who won the award for the AWS Gold Award, lost her award and had to pay back her cash award. http://makingamark.blogspot.com/2008...ntroversy.html (http://makingamark.blogspot.com/2008/09/statement-on-aws-gold-medal-controversy.html), Because her "derivative" work was based upon two photographs on Shutterstock. The Shutterstock photographers screamed copyright infringement, because they were not contacted with a request to "USE" the photographs for a "derivative" work of art. As a result of this incident, many art competetions have insisted that you must "OWN" the Copyright to any photos that you use in your "Derivative" Works.

The solution to this issue is OF COURSE to ALWAYS use your own photos for your artwork.

Why should you listen to me????? I was a Buyer for the City of North Vancouver, and have 19 years of experience with dealing with Copyright Issues and Contract Law in the normal course of business.

Please do a Google search on Art Copyright to educate yourself on this matter if you need more information.
Best Regards
Terry


If there is a poor painter from Russia, you ll expect he has to take a plane, if he wants to paint the tetons?
I think you re describing the perfect ideal situation. But there is a large grey area.

Colorix
04-05-2011, 05:48 AM
The photographers (I read their discussion) could prove that the alleged 'watercolours' were inkjet printouts on paper of their photos, pixel for pixel. So, it was not even 'derivative'. The most funny thing was that the general public, at the exhibitions, said: "These are photographs." The 'art experts' said 'ooooh, aaaah' and awarded the prints, thinking they were originals.

What is even more funny is that the 'artist' in question wrote, on her website that she painted by applying magenta, cyan, and yellow, plus black (aha!).

For this discussion, I'd say it is very wise to read up on copyright laws, both national and international (they are harmonized internationally). Generally, nature and famous vistas are practically free to use. But do check that, I'm no expert either.


In 2008, a Canadian Watercolor Artist who won the award for the AWS Gold Award, lost her award and had to pay back her cash award. http://makingamark.blogspot.com/2008/09/statement-on-aws-gold-medal-controversy.html, Because her "derivative" work was based upon two photographs on Shutterstock. The Shutterstock photographers screamed copyright infringement, because they were not contacted with a request to "USE" the photographs for a "derivative" work of art. As a result of this incident, many art competetions have insisted that you must "OWN" the Copyright to any photos that you use in your "Derivative" Works.

Johannes Instructor
04-05-2011, 08:52 AM
The gray area is how much you copy. A painting is not a copy. I would never copy a photo verbatim anyway. Again to deprive yourself from doing a painting based on a scene from a photo makes no sense. Just make sure you don't copy elements that are not normally at the scene like people wearing specifc clothes or in a certain setting which can only have been done using someone else's photo and I would only worry about that if I were to mass produce it. If you use a photo to paint the tetons or something that is part of a landscape you are ok. Don't deprive yourself of painting just because you did not take that photo. I insist "using a photo for ideas and inspiration".

Johannes Instructor
04-05-2011, 08:55 AM
I don't know if it is legal, but I find it very unethical. Just my thoughts.

Doug
So you believe because someone took a photo of a glacier that is well known you can no longer paint it unless you travel there and take the photo yourself. Since when does someone own a scene? In that case google earth is the owner of the world. Remember the law is COPYright. The law makes it clear. No one has the rights over a landscape scene. Only the photo itself has copyrights. This is very different than a logo for example that is a work produced by someone. People do not create mountains and rivers so they don't own the rights over these scenes.

sundiver
04-05-2011, 11:00 AM
I think the main copyright issue happens if you want to sell the work and it is clearly copied from someone's copyrighted photo- like a specific sunset or something.

Speaking of Google, artists are permitted to paint Google Street View images and sell them. But if you post a picture from Street View it has to have the Google logo on it.
Here is a copy of the rules posted on the Virtual Paintout (http://virtualpaintout.blogspot.com/2010/02/san-francisco-february-2010.html), which uses images from Google Street View.
After speaking with Google's Maps Team, it has been determined that artists can use images from Google Street View as reference for creating paintings and drawings, and the artists can sell these works.

One thing that needs to be made clear. If the artist shows an original view on which a painting is based, i.e. the original screenshot, make sure to keep the Google logo and copyright visible on that screenshot. No logos or mention of Google is necessary on your art itself.

Amandine
04-05-2011, 12:32 PM
The gray area is how much you copy. (... ...) Don't deprive yourself of painting just because you did not take that photo. I insist "using a photo for ideas and inspiration".
Isn't it what you're teaching us, Jo ? Forget about just copying a photo, use it as a concept, manage to modify or improve what's a bit weak ...

mlgk
04-05-2011, 12:43 PM
Can you use the flexible modeling paste on stretched canvas? Also what kind and brand of camera do you use ? I am in the market for a new camera.
Thanks
Martha

etdavis6
04-05-2011, 12:55 PM
Hi Johannes,

I'm a beginner in watercolor and wondered if you could make comments on my homework from last week? It is on page 9, #130 for the March 27th homework.

Once I have your comments, I'd like to try repainting it in a slightly larger format.

I'm not sure about color harmonizing, so I made it in analogue colors, using colors you've suggested (cadmium yellow, yellow ochre, viridian, and blues). Also, I realized that while painting my cerulean blue sky had gotten "eaten up" by the trees -- a "Don't Do" from this weekend's class.

Thanks for any help you can provide. I'm learning lots from these classes, but now I'm trying to put some of this info into practice.

Beth

Johannes Instructor
04-05-2011, 01:01 PM
I think the main copyright issue happens if you want to sell the work and it is clearly copied from someone's copyrighted photo- like a specific sunset or something.

Speaking of Google, artists are permitted to paint Google Street View images and sell them. But if you post a picture from Street View it has to have the Google logo on it.
Here is a copy of the rules posted on the Virtual Paintout (http://virtualpaintout.blogspot.com/2010/02/san-francisco-february-2010.html), which uses images from Google Street View.
After speaking with Google's Maps Team, it has been determined that artists can use images from Google Street View as reference for creating paintings and drawings, and the artists can sell these works.

One thing that needs to be made clear. If the artist shows an original view on which a painting is based, i.e. the original screenshot, make sure to keep the Google logo and copyright visible on that screenshot. No logos or mention of Google is necessary on your art itself.


Right and that's because google knows perfectly well they don't own the rights to a scene.

Johannes Instructor
04-05-2011, 01:04 PM
Can you use the flexible modeling paste on stretched canvas? Also what kind and brand of camera do you use ? I am in the market for a new camera.
Thanks
Martha
Yes you can and I often do that. You can buy those cheap imported canvases and just add the modelling paste to that.
For years I used a point and shoot digital camera (those are the smaller pocket size ones) I would no go for less than 12 megapixels so you can zoom in. But now since I project my photos on a large HDTV I bought a professional Cannon Rebel.

lebeau
04-05-2011, 05:28 PM
I was very pleased with the winter trees demo.
Here is a positive comment: I never had any problems with the transmission of the demos or of the lessons, never...and I receive the e-mail in time.
Am I the only one to be that lucky?

Thanks Johannes

A Lebeau
Montrťal, QC, Canada

34pat9
04-05-2011, 06:21 PM
Like lebeau, I have not had any problems viewing the demos or lessons to date. I also receive timely emails on Sat to log on. I am in Pittsburgh, PA.
Pat

Johannes Instructor
04-05-2011, 06:48 PM
Like lebeau, I have not had any problems viewing the demos or lessons to date. I also receive timely emails on Sat to log on. I am in Pittsburgh, PA.
Pat
The great majority always get smooth sailing. Just some have had some isues that seem to be resolved now with the new broadcasting software.

Yabut
04-05-2011, 09:03 PM
No one owns the rights to a landscape scene.I emphasize "landscape". If I see a photo from someone let's say taken at Peggy's Cove on the internet and I use that photo for ideas to do a painting. That is not copyright infringment. Nobody owns the rights to a landscape scene, only his photo. Thousands of people take photos in National parks. Now in my course I have insisted to that you make your own version of a photo not to copy it but to use it to gain ideas. Ideas cannot be copyrighted only works and photos. I feel you should not limit yourselves to do a painting just because someone took a picture of a scene that so many others have taken of, such as scenes at national parks but you happened not to be there. When I am done with my painting after cropping, changing values, stretching things, changing colors, etc it would be very different than the photo. One thing is a work derived from a photo another is a work inspired on a photo.
Of course it would be up to a judge to determine this but to limit yourself from doing a painting that you are doing for yourself is going to far. To mass produce that painting if it is derived from a photo is another issue.

From the book "Photography and The Law" when referring to copyright infringements of scenes:
"An often overlooked area of infringement involves "derivative" works, or works that exist in a form different from that of the original. For example , it would be infringement of copyright of a photograph to make a sketch of the scene or people depicted in that photograph. (Note, however it is only infringement if the person sketches from the photgraph; it would not be infringement for the person to go to the same spot or to the same person and make the sketch independently.)

teigrelily16
04-05-2011, 09:54 PM
Hi Jo: As I am mostly a graphite artist, I signed up out of curiosity because I use to oil paint. Even though I know most of your nuggets, I have learned a lot about edges and value massing. You are an incredible teacher who really cares about your students and want to make sure they "get it".

I was lucky in my first formal drawing class in that my teacher had us to draw about a 4 in circle with a compass and then draw a much smaller circle inside where the high light would be. Then we would draw in the light area, the shadow area, the core shadow, the reflected light area, and finally the cast shadow. This made the circle into a 3 D ball. This lesson has served me well over the years. I did not know this is a little known fact. I am glad you have brought it up. I see this principle in old masters' painting all the time.

Also, I suspect that F&W is waiting for for all your classes to be finished so that they can offer single lessons, or a whole package deal at the same time.

Awesome classes, thanks

Sian

"Art washes from the soul the dust of everyday life." Picasso

teigrelily16
04-05-2011, 10:10 PM
Hi again Jo: You have been wondering from the beginning why nature keeps making lollipop trees, triangles, straight lines, ladders, domes, bowls, and etc. I think I know the answer. It is called "fractals". Fractals are a mathematical and geometrical equation of repeating shapes that grow larger or smaller. A rose is a very good example. When looking into the center, there is a tiny petal. Then next to it is a little bit larger petal and so on. These petals can continue to grow larger or smaller until you can only see them with a microscope or a petal can over take a room.

Just another interesting piece of trivia to clutter up your brain.

Sian

Johannes Instructor
04-06-2011, 09:47 AM
From the book "Photography and The Law" when referring to copyright infringements of scenes:
"An often overlooked area of infringement involves "derivative" works, or works that exist in a form different from that of the original. For example , it would be infringement of copyright of a photograph to make a sketch of the scene or people depicted in that photograph. (Note, however it is only infringement if the person sketches from the photgraph; it would not be infringement for the person to go to the same spot or to the same person and make the sketch independently.)
I believe this refers to a sketch with equal sizes and proportions. I change sizes and proportions to suit my composition all the time. Again this would be up to a judge but in my paintings I find it very difficult to prove I infringed copyrights.

jfwalton
04-06-2011, 11:51 AM
Johannes,
When gessoing on top of the modeling paste, do you use the crisscross method also?

Johannes Instructor
04-06-2011, 12:14 PM
Johannes,
When gessoing on top of the modeling paste, do you use the crisscross method also?
yes make sure your strokes are short so you don't see raking lines.

susanc
04-06-2011, 12:20 PM
Oops!

susanc
04-06-2011, 12:43 PM
What Johannes is referring to is called "Fair Use" in the United States. :)

According to the US Copyright Office itself:
"Copyright protects the particular way authors have expressed themselves. It does not extend to any ideas, systems, or factual information conveyed in a work."

To further quote the Copyright Office:
"One of the rights accorded to the owner of copyright is the right to reproduce or to authorize others to reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords. This right is subject to certain limitations found in sections 107 through 118 of the copyright law (title 17, U. S. Code). One of the more important limitations is the doctrine of fair use. "
[Emphasis mine.]

Section 107 of the copyright law lists four factors that determine what qualifies as fair use:
1. The purpose and character of the use
2. The nature of the copyrighted work
3. The amount and importance of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole (You are undoubtedly fried if you've copied a photo dead-on!) :eek:
4. The effect of the use upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work

And as Johannes mentioned, there is still a risk of being sued even under fair use, but if you can meet most of the above criteria, it's possible to win your case. You might not want to risk all the court costs and stress! :) It's up to you... :)

susanc
04-06-2011, 03:04 PM
I trust Johannes' judgment in books, so I ordered "Powerful Watercolor Landscapes" even though I paint in oils. It arrived Monday. If any of you were at the December webinars, it reminds me of back then, when Johannes was drowning us in a barrage of golden nuggets!

To me, it's not like some books that try to pad what they are saying to make the book seem longer. This author is truly a giver, and there are many golden nuggets in it.

Thanks, Jo! I wouldn't have looked at it otherwise since "watercolor" is in the title. :)

IdahoHat
04-06-2011, 03:54 PM
Johannes - I have so enjoyed the last two Saturday webinars. I am not able to do the Sunday ones, since we drive out into the mountains of Idaho to minister in a church and can't be back in time. This Saturday I will be demonstrating in an art show here in Coeur d'Alene (fun) and will not make the Saturday class this week (groan.) Thank you and F&W Media so much for this great opportunity. Have learned so much.

teigrelily16
04-06-2011, 05:23 PM
Hi! Thought I would give all you oil painters an interesting tip. You can spray w/c paper or other heavy papers with several (probably 3), with a coating of Krylon Matte Finish and then, after drying, paint on the paper with oils. The linseed oil in the paints will not bleed outside of the painted area.

A neat idea! Huh?

Sian

Baroque: when I have no Monet.

Johannes Instructor
04-06-2011, 06:28 PM
I trust Johannes' judgment in books, so I ordered "Powerful Watercolor Landscapes" even though I paint in oils. It arrived Monday. If any of you were at the December webinars, it reminds me of back then, when Johannes was drowning us in a barrage of golden nuggets!

To me, it's not like some books that try to pad what they are saying to make the book seem longer. This author is truly a giver, and there are many golden nuggets in it.

Thanks, Jo! I wouldn't have looked at it otherwise since "watercolor" is in the title. :)

The book has examples in watercolor but the nuggets the author gives is for all mediums. Personally I think she shot herself in the foot with that title because she would sell more books of she used another title. Good thing I specified it was not for watercolor only.

karan55
04-06-2011, 07:21 PM
I trust Johannes' judgment in books, so I ordered "Powerful Watercolor Landscapes" even though I paint in oils. It arrived Monday. If any of you were at the December webinars, it reminds me of back then, when Johannes was drowning us in a barrage of golden nuggets!

To me, it's not like some books that try to pad what they are saying to make the book seem longer. This author is truly a giver, and there are many golden nuggets in it.

Thanks, Jo! I wouldn't have looked at it otherwise since "watercolor" is in the title. :)

I am glad you wrote this post, thanking Johannes......I got my copy of "Powerful Watercolor Landscapes" this week, too! I love it! I am already on my second time through; it reads as if Johannes was speaking to us. She must be a kindred spirit of his, the way she uses analogies! I love the power tool #15 "Gremlin patrol" to find all the left brain corrections. I am trying to learn watercolor and there are some really good nuggets for watercolorists; "avoid the water jar" and "don't pat the cat" have already made a big difference. I too, would not have bought this book without Jo's endorsement. Now I have 5 great books (Jo's top5) that have been really helpful as well a fun to read. Carlson's Guide is still my favorite.

uthule13
04-06-2011, 08:55 PM
Carlson's book is a disappointment to me because of no color. I'll still read it, but my biggest thrill with art books is seeing what others can do that I'd like to.

Johannes Instructor
04-06-2011, 09:02 PM
Carlson's book is a disappointment to me because of no color. I'll still read it, but my biggest thrill with art books is seeing what others can do that I'd like to.
I agree it is not an entertaining book. It lacks drawings etc which "Your Artist' Brain and Powerful Watercolor Landscapes" have but it is packed with valuable information. I would read a bit at a time. Maybe a page a day. I had to highlight the key points. This book is for the serious landscape artist.

karan55
04-06-2011, 09:03 PM
Carlson's book is a disappointment to me because of no color. I'll still read it, but my biggest thrill with art books is seeing what others can do that I'd like to.

Google Carlson and you can see his paintings in color. I love the book because it is good reading; but I also love good pictures. I found over 20 of his paintings and downloaded them so I could see study them. They look good in B&W, but even better in color.

susanc
04-06-2011, 09:30 PM
Here's a blog with a few of John F. Carlson's paintings in color:
http://stapletonkearns.blogspot.com/2009/06/i-have-been-provided-with-massive.html
He discusses Carlson (and shows some of his color images) for five days, from Thursday, June 18, 2009 to Monday, June 22, 2009.

Great suggestion, Karan! It was enjoyable looking at them. I think he sometimes paints in a slightly darker value than the modern trend of Clyde Aspevig, etc., but it's still inspiring to look at and learn from.

Eddypus1
04-06-2011, 10:08 PM
Hi Johannes I have been reading articles on Notan studies. There is also a good video explaining Notan by Virtual Art Academy. From what I understand, these studies are good tools to help you plan good design shapes similar to what you have taught us about creating abstract shapes. The notan in black and white help you see the positive and negative shapes only.I guess it helps you see with your right brain. Arthur Wesley Dow in his book Composition takes the black and white Notan to greyscales value studies. Are you familiar with Arthur Wesley Dow's book?

Johannes Instructor
04-06-2011, 10:33 PM
Hi Johannes I have been reading articles on Notan studies. There is also a good video explaining Notan by Virtual Art Academy. From what I understand, these studies are good tools to help you plan good design shapes similar to what you have taught us about creating abstract shapes. The notan in black and white help you see the positive and negative shapes only.I guess it helps you see with your right brain. Arthur Wesley Dow in his book Composition takes the black and white Notan to greyscales value studies. Are you familiar with Arthur Wesley Dow's book?
Yes I am familiar with it and his book is now public domain which means all copyright has run out. What I am teaching you is not new things that are not known by others. There are techniques that I conceived, yes. Those who can say are my ideas, but most of what I am teaching is what top artists know. Probably I take the time to word it clearly and show examples so this info sinks in. Maybe I just care that others learn. Also I have the advantage of the online teaching system to display images for better understanding.

Davkin
04-07-2011, 12:08 AM
I trust Johannes' judgment in books, so I ordered "Powerful Watercolor Landscapes" even though I paint in oils. It arrived Monday. If any of you were at the December webinars, it reminds me of back then, when Johannes was drowning us in a barrage of golden nuggets!

To me, it's not like some books that try to pad what they are saying to make the book seem longer. This author is truly a giver, and there are many golden nuggets in it.

Thanks, Jo! I wouldn't have looked at it otherwise since "watercolor" is in the title. :)

I bought that book as well only because Jo recommended it, I have no interest in watercolor. The reality is, besides the examples shown throughout the book there is very little to do specifically about watercolor in it. That book is at least 95% about design and composition, they are really underselling it by call it a watercolor book. Same thing with the Painting better Landscapes in Oils book, very little of it has to do with the specific medium of oils, it's also almost entirely about design and composition.

David

Eddypus1
04-07-2011, 08:12 AM
Johannes you really should think of writing a book. You really explain and demonstrate things clearly. I've been painting and taking classes for so many years and I have an extensive library of art books. I now go back to them now and I agree with you, these techniques known for a long time but just like Betty Edwards opened my eyes (and for other people too) to seeing with my right brain, you are opening my eyes to painting and composition. Finally I found what I've been looking for to improve my art. Thank you Johannes!

Johannes Instructor
04-07-2011, 09:14 AM
Johannes you really should think of writing a book. You really explain and demonstrate things clearly. I've been painting and taking classes for so many years and I have an extensive library of art books. I now go back to them now and I agree with you, these techniques known for a long time but just like Betty Edwards opened my eyes (and for other people too) to seeing with my right brain, you are opening my eyes to painting and composition. Finally I found what I've been looking for to improve my art. Thank you Johannes!

Thank you Eddy. This is the advantage of doing the internet classes. Things can be made real clear. Personally I feel these kinds of classes are weapons of mass instruction.

allydoodle
04-07-2011, 02:06 PM
Johannes,

I just peeked at the photos of Clyde Aspevigs demo over in its designated thread. A big THANK YOU to Shea for posting those! I thought it was fantastic, and I wasn't sure if I should post any comments there, so I didn't. I didn't want to clutter up the thread and make it difficult for others to view.

I also rated it 5 stars because I found it very informative and quite a gem to look at. I'm wondering if others might want to do the same, rate it 5 stars, so that maybe it can become a 'sticky' and stay at the top of the threadboard? Just a thought, as Aspevig is such an inspiring artist, and he seems to garner quite a lot of respect in the landscape painters' world. I wouldn't want that thread to eventually disappear to the bottom, especially if new artists join and don't even know it exists. I'm thinking it might be a good idea to not allow others to post there to keep it uncluttered.

Just thinking out loud here, I hope you don't mind my suggestions.

Great lessons from you thus far, I'm soaking it all in, reading, applying, and enjoying! I'm really looking forward to Saturday's webinar!

winecountry
04-07-2011, 03:44 PM
thanks for the link to the color Carolsens...fab, what a designer of shapes!

susanc
04-07-2011, 06:26 PM
I can't believe it! The day I've been waiting for has finally arrived. But do you happen to know if we have to wait until the lessons are all over to be able to purchase the downloads as a discounted unit? Thanks!

Oh..just checked facebook. Great idea!

Johannes Instructor
04-07-2011, 06:38 PM
I can't believe it! The day I've been waiting for has finally arrived. But do you happen to know if we have to wait until the lessons are all over to be able to purchase the downloads as a discounted unit? Thanks!

Oh..just checked facebook. Great idea!
I don't know if they will give a further discount. The WCLIVE code works to get 10% off.

Johannes Instructor
04-07-2011, 06:43 PM
Northlight has put up the first 12 lessons of the classes I havegiven you on weekends. This is half of the full course of 24 lessons, "PaintStunning Landscapes from Photos", is now available for download.
Each weekend has a course description under each title so you know which one tobuy. Remember if you type in "WCLIVE" you get a 10% discount.

Go to this website to purchase the lessons:

http://improvemypaintings.com (http://improvemypaintings.com/)



Right click on the download link and select " save link as" and it will download onto your desktop or wherever you want it to go.Then it will play in quick time player or whatever player you have installed onyour computer.


Click on "Buy Recorded Classes" to get the links.

Silverlark
04-07-2011, 10:48 PM
Johannes,
Wow! Your web class truly is a weapon of mass instruction! So glad to see the CD's are out 'cause I missed a few lessons. Must go look at that Clyde Aspevig demo, too, sounds great.

Just for fun, thought I'd post this little Frog, to show that your teachings about abstract shapes, value masses, melodic line, and edges work across the board for ALL genres.

Theresa

"Princely Spirits" Acrylics 2.5 x 3.5 inches, on illustration board
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Apr-2011/10034-bottlefrog2.jpg

Johannes Instructor
04-07-2011, 11:14 PM
Johannes,
Wow! Your web class truly is a weapon of mass instruction! So glad to see the CD's are out 'cause I missed a few lessons. Must go look at that Clyde Aspevig demo, too, sounds great.

Just for fun, thought I'd post this little Frog, to show that your teachings about abstract shapes, value masses, melodic line, and edges work across the board for ALL genres.

Theresa

"Princely Spirits" Acrylics 2.5 x 3.5 inches, on illustration board
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/07-Apr-2011/10034-bottlefrog2.jpg
Yes the concepts apply to all genres, portraits, still lifes, figure drawings, landscapes. Understanding melodic lines, abstract shapes, negative shapes, edges, etc is essential. I like the art work you posted. You were skillful to change what would've been a triangle with the frog and the bottle.

Silverlark
04-07-2011, 11:26 PM
Thanks Johannes! I just now noticed that triangle... LOL!
Big Thanks to Shea for posting Clyde Aspevig notes and demo. Definitely a five star rating.

Was reading the copyright discussion in this thread, I think you're right on. Once it's rearranged sufficiently, it's no longer a copy. It's just reference, and wouldn't be recognized. I painted a toy frog and made it look different. I don't think Mattel or Hasbro will sue me. Or even Disney, LOL! (Don't mess with The Mouse, y'all!)
Theresa

winecountry
04-08-2011, 01:02 PM
Downloaded the classes from the F and W site last night, they are clear as a bell...What a really great thing they've done making them available in such a form and they have clearly put the description so I can find what I need.


Thanks Johannes and Thanks F and W!

IrmaH322
04-08-2011, 04:02 PM
I downloaded the 12 lessons last night, all are clear and the sound is perfect. This morning I watched the watercolor demo twice, you make it look so easy. Now I can watch each video and pause to make my notes more clear, I don't know how Robert does it, his are so perfect and with drawings!
Thank you Johannes for such an important course and I hope more will come, I will buy them as well. My thanks also to F&W and all involved in this project hopefully they will do more with such a good Maestro.