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Bobar57
03-02-2011, 02:14 AM
I have one of the "Spanish" or "V.Piera paintboxes,made of heavy metal and enameled black outside and white inside with 2 mixing areas or wells.I used the other day a cadmium orange watercolor that stained the white enamel of the used well of a pale yellowish tone.I used everything I think of(Clorox,the magic foam of Mr.Clean,AJAX, even oven cleaner,not to avail.
Does anyone have an idea of of how to get rid of the yellowish tone in the mixing well?
Not only that I won't see accurately the color used or mixed against a yellowish background,is that I'm picky too and I have all my tools(brushes,palettes,you name it) in pristine clean condition even after some use.I clean my brushes after every session with the Escoda soap bar,it makes wonders,not only clean your brush perfectly,it also condition the natural hair on the fine brushes.I highly recommend it.Cheap Joe's carry it.
Well,I need help,don't I?:confused:

Bob

Dondi
03-02-2011, 02:29 AM
I sympathize, Bob. My favorite palette, made by Creative Arts - and I love it for a lot of reasons - is stained permanently by my use of quinacridones. The only palettes I've found that avoids this problem altogether are made of porcelain. There are lots of them out there and they're not terribly expensive. I know this doesn't make up for the investment you've already made, but if you go for porcelain next time, you'll be happier.
:heart:
Dondi

gmarie
03-02-2011, 02:41 AM
Bob, the "stains" are a wonderful kaleidoscope of color trademarking the watercolor painter beautifully. :D

You might appreciate THIS (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=869712) thread I found in the Learning Zone.

I recall several discussions on this delightful phenomenon, just happened to find this one quickly.

juneto
03-02-2011, 02:47 AM
Try a bit of Chlorox Clean-Up on a wet paper towel and see if that does it .
You have to know that enamel will eventually stain all the time . The surface sheen will give out in time
Those who use them become inured to it , so it doesn't bother them. They know automatically what they are mixing .
I have a Pike's palette (2 actually over time ) made of a hard Plastic. I have used it for years.
It stains a bit sometimes and I wipe it up , but it has not lost it's shine.
If this becomes an issue you cannot ignore , you need a new palette.
It isn't something you should have to bother about .
Your brushes and palette should be like your Forks and Knives .You just take them out to eat with, wash them up and use them again the next day .
June:thumbsup:

Mayberry
03-02-2011, 02:48 AM
Didn't somebody say somewhere about using a bit of oil for rubbing a stain off a palette? I can't remember where I read this, but I'm sure I did read it from someone here. I don't remember what kind of oil. Salad oil? Baby oil?

I second Dondi about porcelain. It doesn't stain. It is pristine clean after a quick wipe with a damp paper towel. The drawback is you can't really hold it in your hand and carry it around with you, except for maybe a small porcelain condiment dish, or a flower petal dish.

Dondi
03-02-2011, 03:16 AM
Hate to disagree with some of the experts here, but, the staining on Bob's palette is an actual problem. Think about trying to mix reds, blues or purples on a permanently yellow palette! Not. Going. To. Work. Kids. The colors on the palette are always going to be distorted.
:heart:
Dondi

Yorky
03-02-2011, 03:50 AM
I don't worry, I just use the same mixing area for the same colour all the time.

Doug

ingegerd
03-02-2011, 08:20 AM
Have you tried using a white eraser?

I can get phtalo and quinacridone off from my tinbox by rubbing it with a white eraser.

painterbear
03-02-2011, 08:34 AM
Bob,
Try putting a piece of paper towel over the stain and saturate it with bleach. Let it sit for a while and see if that helps to remove the stain. I've used that technique on porcelain sinks and it works.

Sylvia

Johnnie
03-02-2011, 09:06 AM
What about trying that stuff they advertise on TV for stains etc called CLR..

Johnnie

WthrLady
03-02-2011, 09:49 AM
Having rampant OCD, I can totally see how this drives you batty. I can also see where it being distracting while mixing other colours could be a problem.

The yellowing stain could also be a result of the oxidation of the bleach on the enamel. Lead base product goes yellowy when hit with a mild bleach solution. They use leads to get white in enameling.

Barring that I use Tilex Original to pull stains off my enameled white kitchen sink. Regular bleach doesn't do it, oxiclean doesn't cut it, neither does CLR. But tilex for bathrooms, I'm sparkling white in under 20 seconds again.

If all else fails, they have small containers of re-enameling paint and glaze at the hardware store. It's made for chipped tiles, and cast iron bathroom fixtures that are enameled and need a redo.

watercolourfanatic
03-02-2011, 10:01 AM
I use a product called Cif and this seems to work fine on white enamelled paint boxes.:thumbsup: It is a well-known name in the UK which used to be called Jif. Don't ask me why they changed the name.:confused: One thing is to clean the palette immediately after use with Cif, and indeed keep it clean during a painting session by periodically cleaning with kitchen roll and water. Unilever make it so I imagine it must be available in many countries. Nothing remains pristine forever though.

Peter:)

BDorsa
03-02-2011, 10:30 AM
have you tried putting some white vinegar on it & letting it sit out in the sun for 3-4 hrs?

CharM
03-02-2011, 11:36 AM
I have been so :envy: about the beautiful enamelled paint boxes in the other thread... I have a $6 plastic folding palette that stains like mad. To remove the stains, I rub across them with a white plastic eraser. It removes everything and the white mixing areas become pristine again. This might work for you and it might not...

Bobar57
03-02-2011, 12:21 PM
I tried everything:Clorox,the Mr.Clean Magic Sponge,the Magic Eraser from Cheap Joe's,bathroom cleaner.I'm missing only the vinegar in the sun.Will try it today.
The most important issue for me is not that I'm picky and meticulous,if nothing work I can live with that if it were not for the fact that this yellowish background affect the ability to mix an accurate hue or color in that particular mixing well.I'll try the re-touch enamel mentioned here,but,it is the whole mixing area of roughly 4"x8".That requires better a spray paint over(enamel of course)and I'm not good at it.
I read somewhere the oil trick too.Today I'll try the oil.If it fails,then the Tilex original,if not I will try to locate the Cif,thanks Peter:wave:.And thank you all for your responses and coming to the rescue.:D

Bob

StrugglingArtist
03-02-2011, 12:45 PM
Bob,

Handprint.com suggests:

"...finely particulated, staining synthetic organic paints (dioxazine, phthalo, quinacridone or benzimidazolone paints in particular) will leave stubborn stains on plastic or porcelain (though a little lighter fluid and a paper towel, or a white "Mars plastic" eraser, will clean these off almost completely)."

Steve.

Bobar57
03-02-2011, 12:59 PM
Bob,

Handprint.com suggests:

"...finely particulated, staining synthetic organic paints (dioxazine, phthalo, quinacridone or benzimidazolone paints in particular) will leave stubborn stains on plastic or porcelain (though a little lighter fluid and a paper towel, or a white "Mars plastic" eraser, will clean these off almost completely)."

Steve.

Hmmm:cool:,thanks Steve.I try that if the vinegar or Tilex fails.But I have a Mars plastic eraser,I'll try it with it first.
Thanks again,

Bob

BDorsa
03-02-2011, 01:41 PM
don't forget the power of sunshine

Bobar57
03-02-2011, 01:50 PM
don't forget the power of sunshine

:)It is on the balcony now with vinegar,but there isn't much sunshine today.Is on and off,a little clouded by a mild cold front that entered last night.
Anyway I will leave it there for a few hours,I hope that then it won't be reddish,since is red cider vinegar what I had at hand.:D

Bob

Bobar57
03-02-2011, 03:53 PM
Now is worst.:envy:Since it was red vinegar,there are reddish marks too.:(
Now I'm trying S-32 Spot and Stain Remover with sun..if any appears now...it's more cloudy.

Bob

Mayberry
03-02-2011, 04:00 PM
Well now if you put oil on, you will have salad dressing! Sorry things are getting worse. I hope all these harsh chemicals aren't etching the enamel.

cgonzaga
03-02-2011, 06:23 PM
Cathy, you read my mind. Almost all the chemicals mentioned are corrosive to some extent. I wouldn't be surprised if Bob just made a better surface for the stains to hang onto.

Bob, that is why I don't bother with them, and I know that is not what you want to hear. chi2

Bobar57
03-02-2011, 06:30 PM
Cathy, you read my mind. Almost all the chemicals mentioned are corrosive to some extent. I wouldn't be surprised if Bob just made a better surface for the stains to hang onto.

Bob, that is why I don't bother with them, and I know that is not what you want to hear. chi2

Too Late Chito:(,it already is to some extent etched by these chemicals.I got a hold of some white vinegar and pored on it,lets see what happens,either I save it or I ruin it.:o

Bob

cgonzaga
03-02-2011, 07:40 PM
Bob, I'm not giving mine up. :evil: :lol:

Bobar57
03-02-2011, 08:39 PM
Bob, I'm not giving mine up. :evil: :lol:
Damnit:envy:!!!!!!I knew it!!!!:envy:

Bob

Bobar57
03-02-2011, 09:42 PM
I will sell it:(..........

Bob

Mayberry
03-02-2011, 10:05 PM
Remember, you don't have a stain in the sense of an organic type substance that you can bleach to white. You have a mineral solid that probably does not react to bleach at all. You need to remove the tiny solid particles of the cadmium pigment, and you want to do it without scratching the enamel. So the idea for removing the pigment particles has to involve either using a liquid to surround the particles and wash/wipe them out (oil or soapy water or something like that), or using a gentle, soft abrasive like the mars eraser to rub the particles off.

Oh, I just found this when I looked up cadmium sulfide in wikipedia:

**** Cadmium sulfide is soluble in (actually degraded by) acids, and this conversion has been investigated as a method of extracting the pigment from waste polymers e.g. HDPE pipes:

CdS + 2 HCl → CdCl2 + H2S ****

That involves dissolving the cadmium pigment with hydrocloric acid to produce cadmium chloride and hydrogen sulfide. The cadmium chloride would be a white powder that would dissolve in water, solving the yellow stain problem. The hydrogen sulfide would be a highly toxic gas, though probably in very small quantities. If you want to go the chemical route of removal, get your hands on some hydrochloric acid and don't breathe the fumes that result!

I don't know if the vinegar will also eventually dissolve the cadmium sulfide. If it does, you would wind up with cadmium acetate and still get the hydrogen sulfide gas. So keep the stuff outside or by an open window.

Of course, you wouldn't want to go through this every time you paint with cadmium paint...

Bobar57
03-02-2011, 10:35 PM
The vinegar dissolved it quite a lot,but then,the other stuff I used and probably the vinegar too,left some marks-even if the enamel is still shiny-so I'm not happy with the results.
It will go to the sales ads for a reasonable price O.B.O.:(

Bob
PS If I use hydrochloric acid I believe the results on the enamel will be worst.

juneto
03-03-2011, 02:13 AM
It sounds like the surface coat has already been removed to porous . I would quit now and be less fastidious with the next one and buy plastic or porcelain in the future .
It is just paint you know .It will take just so much scrubbing
June:( :(

Bobar57
03-03-2011, 02:25 AM
It sounds like the surface coat has already been removed to porous . I would quit now and be less fastidious with the next one and buy plastic or porcelain in the future .
It is just paint you know .It will take just so much scrubbing
June:( :(
Yes June.A hard learned lesson.:o

Bob

Yorky
03-03-2011, 03:15 AM
Do what I do - mix blues in the blue stained area, reds in the red stained area, greens in the green stained area etc. It doesn't worry me, I rarely see the white surface in any case, I let my pigment stay on the palette.

Doug

Bobar57
03-03-2011, 03:30 AM
Do what I do - mix blues in the blue stained area, reds in the red stained area, greens in the green stained area etc. It doesn't worry me, I rarely see the white surface in any case, I let my pigment stay on the palette.

Doug

That is great idea for a palette with more than 2 mixing wells.This one is the "Spanish Paintbox" that we have talked about so much and it has only 2 mixing wells(3 if you remove the paint wells tray,but is pointless since I discovered I paint better standing,so I need the tray in the palette).
I'll sell it and settle for a Holbein model 500(5 mixing wells and 24 paint wells).

Bob

juneto
03-03-2011, 02:25 PM
Would you consider re-enameling it yourself ?
June:) :)

Bobar57
03-03-2011, 03:02 PM
Would you consider re-enameling it yourself ?
June:) :)

June,I will do it if I knew how to do it,but I haven't the slightest idea of how is done(materials needed,how to procedure,etc.)
If some one knows,please PM me with the instructions,I beg you,thanks,

Bob

Marcio C
03-03-2011, 03:36 PM
I had had problems with staining in the past with plastic palettes, but since I moved to metal (both holbein and schmincke) I haven't had any stains. I must also disclose I avoid heavily staining colors like winsor blue anyway, and that may in part explain it. But I wouldn't worry if I got stains--if I could see stains through my mix it would be a sign that the mix is too thin for my purposes anyway.
My suggestion is the homee folding palette, since it has a transparent plastic insert you could use to mix your staining colors in.

claude j greengrass
03-03-2011, 03:38 PM
Do what I do - mix blues in the blue stained area, reds in the red stained area, greens in the green stained area etc. It doesn't worry me, I rarely see the white surface in any case, I let my pigment stay on the palette.

Doug I'm with you Yorky. I've got two cheap white plastic butcher trays. One for darks and one for brighter colours. The only time they get cleaned is when I run out of room to put down some yellow. Most of the time a quick spritz with the spray bottle and I'm good to go.

juneto
03-04-2011, 02:15 AM
Bob , Go to your Local paint store and ask them what enamel would cover metal. They have spray -cans and auto paint ,which probably would work great and all sorts of stuff .
They know all about it . I am nearly sure also, that they will also ask you to lightly sand the palette and wash clean before you do anything , so as to give tooth to the New enamel .
You have nothing to lose by trying.
June

Bobar57
03-04-2011, 07:52 AM
Thanks June:).I already called Home Depot and they told me to stop by and told me too of sanding a bit to the new enamel to have a grip surface.They even told me the number of grits of the sanding paper but I forgot,I'll ask again while there.:)

Bob

PS I will fix it before selling it.Definitely I'm not a man of 16 colors only and much mixing.I prefer a Holbein 500 with 24 paints wells and 5 mixing areas.I already ordered one.

CharM
03-04-2011, 09:08 AM
Someone, I think it was Grainne, made a travel palette from an altoid tin that she enamelled... I'll try to find the thread...

I finally found it and you can Click Here (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=552457) to read how Grainne made her plein air kit. Sadly, I don't think her solution will work for your tin, Bob. She used the enamel touch up for appliances to paint the small surfaces of her boxes.

Marcio C
03-04-2011, 12:51 PM
Too bad, Bob, I would have bought this one from you when it was merely stained. But now that it's been treated with all this stuff, I don't think so... :)
Painters have to learn to live with stains... floor, walls, clothes... it's the seamy side of the job. Good luck with your palettes.

Bobar57
03-04-2011, 01:37 PM
Too bad, Bob, I would have bought this one from you when it was merely stained. But now that it's been treated with all this stuff, I don't think so... :)
Painters have to learn to live with stains... floor, walls, clothes... it's the seamy side of the job. Good luck with your palettes.
Hi Marcio:wave:,what about if I restore it properly,will you buy it?
I have to make up some part for the pocket money lost in the Holbein I ordered.:)

Bob

DN Manel
03-05-2011, 09:08 AM
Sorry about your palette Bob :-(. Just read this thread... What a shame.
Anyway, in the future try plastic eraser first. Works great for me.
Hope you'll be happy with your Holbein.

Johnnie
03-05-2011, 09:18 AM
I have a few palettes that have stained etc etc..
I switched to use an Glass Deviled Egg dish.. Works great has little bumps where the eggs lay to use for different colours , middle part to do the mixing.

Best thing is it does not stain.. Even better is it is so smooth there is no scrubbing of your delicate sable brushes..

You can find them on the internet anywhere. Mine has gold trim so I guess that makes it work better. lol.. I actually got the idea from Susan Harrison Tustain's dvd as that is what she uses. So easy to clean too.

Johnnie

Here is my egg platter.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Mar-2011/21575-deviled_eggs_platter.JPG

Yorky
03-05-2011, 09:35 AM
A perfect solution Johnnie :thumbsup:

Doug

Johnnie
03-05-2011, 11:40 AM
A perfect solution Johnnie :thumbsup:

Doug

Hi Doug

Yes its great. You should try one.. To see what the feel of the brush get one of mama's dinner plates then put a couple of colours on the plate to make a mix. then take your brush and mix the paints then add water or do whatever.

That will give you a pretty good idea of what it is like to use.. The Devil Egg dish is better tho due to it having the spots around the edge where the eggs would sit.. You put your different colours of your palette in each spot... Then use the center to do your mixing..

My dish is a Gold Trimmed FireStone deviled egg platter. Available all over then net. Just do a search.. I could not find one locally.

Works Tickety-Boo !! ; - )

Johnnie

Bobar57
03-05-2011, 12:23 PM
Sorry about your palette Bob :-(. Just read this thread... What a shame.
Anyway, in the future try plastic eraser first. Works great for me.
Hope you'll be happy with your Holbein.

Yes friend,it's a shame.But i has a solution.I was told that I can use spray enamel(sanding a bit the damage are,entire mix well,should be sanded,not just the spots)Then I cover with paper and masking tape the rest of the palette and a thin coat of enamel will do it.That is the solution given to me by the paint experts a the hardware store.
Then I'll decide if to keep it or sell it,since I'm getting the Holbein.I'm already nervous with the Holbein since there are reports of the enamel bubbling due to corrosion of the metal underneath.
Lets see what happens.
I'm now looking at the beautiful monkey and thinking where to take for framing next month.
Thanks a million for such wonderful painting and your gesture.:)

Take care,

Bob

DN Manel
03-05-2011, 01:39 PM
My pleasure Bob.

By the way, good luck with repairing your box. Let us know once it's done.

claude j greengrass
03-05-2011, 02:21 PM
...Let us know once it's done.
I'm certain that Bob will oblige.

Bobar57
03-05-2011, 02:47 PM
My pleasure Bob.

By the way, good luck with repairing your box. Let us know once it's done.

I certainly will DN Manel and Jean.
Here is the pictured of the"damaged" finish.It didn't got worst enough as to etch it,but still I'm not satisfied,I'm picky.;)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Mar-2011/214336-DSCF0868.JPG

Bob

graesea
03-05-2011, 10:54 PM
Have you tried the concentrated version of Citra Solv? It's pretty amazing stuff.

Bobar57
03-05-2011, 11:11 PM
Have you tried the concentrated version of Citra Solv? It's pretty amazing stuff.
No,I haven't.I don't want to use any other chemical unless is proven to no damage an enamel finish.Have you tried it on enamel?

Bob

johnb2
03-06-2011, 12:40 AM
Bob

I feel your frustration! What comes to mind are the Mr.Clean Magic Sponge and some Crisco grease. That's what I use when removing thalos which stain like #%@#. Cut the sponge in pieces to work it over the stain dry. Failing that use a paper towel on your finger tip, dip lightly into can of Crisco and rub off the stain. I never worry about cadmiums but the thalos really get me going.

Bobar57
03-06-2011, 01:40 AM
Bob

I feel your frustration! What comes to mind are the Mr.Clean Magic Sponge and some Crisco grease. That's what I use when removing thalos which stain like #%@#. Cut the sponge in pieces to work it over the stain dry. Failing that use a paper towel on your finger tip, dip lightly into can of Crisco and rub off the stain. I never worry about cadmiums but the thalos really get me going.
I have yet to try the Crisco grease,never purchased it(high cholesterol).
But I do have the Mr.Clean Magic Sponge.
I'll gt the grease tomorrow.

Bob

juneto
03-06-2011, 01:54 AM
The Sponge will abrade the surface again .
If abrades paper, it will do the same to paint .
June:eek:

Bobar57
03-06-2011, 03:05 AM
The Sponge will abrade the surface again .
If abrades paper, it will do the same to paint .
June:eek:
No June,it doesn't.I just solved the problem with "Formula 88" a household and industrial cleaner and degreaser made right here in Miami,more exactly in Hialeah Gardens.I has its own website (http://formula88.com/inicio/).
Don't get fooled,this is powerful stuff,it's hard in your hands,I recommend gloves.I used it without diluting, a quick swept with the Magic Sponge of Mr.Clean and then a had bristles nylon brush.It got rid of even a phatlo blue in one paint well that I didn't mentioned,there is a faint blue in some corners,but who cares?Is the paint well not the mixing well!!!
The mixing well has still some faint shade of yellow in a corner and the shining difference(not confuse with etching) from the anterior experiment is still there.
Well is late,tomorrow I post photos of the palette and the "magic" solution.
Jezzz,I used that stuff years ago while working part-time in a boating and fishing tackle store that got burned.All the savaged merchandise was of couse smoked and some almost black,we separated the ones that could be saved and dipped in Formula 88 they went!!...I don't have to tell you that the owners did a real good garage sale after that.
I ordered already a Holbein 500,this one will go to the Swap Shop for a reasonable price O.B.O.
I'm not much of a mixer and dislike stained mixing wells if they will use another color later,therefore a 24 paints wells with 5 mixing wells make more sense to me.

Bob

Bobar57
03-06-2011, 12:48 PM
Here are pictures of the product used and the results:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Mar-2011/214336-DSCF0871.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Mar-2011/214336-DSCF0880.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Mar-2011/214336-DSCF0881.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Mar-2011/214336-DSCF0882.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/06-Mar-2011/214336-DSCF0883.JPG

Bob

Yorky
03-06-2011, 12:51 PM
It looks spotless to me Bob - almost clinical ;)

Doug

Bobar57
03-06-2011, 01:11 PM
Yep Doug,the Formula 88 did the trick.:thumbsup:

Bob

Mayberry
03-06-2011, 01:15 PM
I like your hake collection! Nice brush holders too.

Bobar57
03-06-2011, 05:46 PM
Thanks Kathy,the brush holder is a nice Japanese vase or cup.I used to have another from W&N,but I tipped it over by accident and it broke to pieces.The hakes are mainly the Ron Ranson type,very cheap at Cheap' Joe's.

Bob

Bob

karenlee
03-06-2011, 06:22 PM
I commend your persistence. It looks like you have succeeded in restoring the palette to its original condition!

Bobar57
03-06-2011, 07:48 PM
Thanks Karen.:)

Bob

Neeman
03-09-2011, 07:23 AM
And the moral to this story is...........

Mix on your paper,
not on your palette........

RogerPf
03-09-2011, 10:05 AM
Didn't somebody say somewhere about using a bit of oil for rubbing a stain off a palette? I can't remember where I read this, but I'm sure I did read it from someone here. I don't remember what kind of oil. Salad oil? Baby oil? ...
HI Mayberry - This may have been me. What I found was that a phthalo stained plastic pallette could be cleaned by viggorous rubbing with a finger. The oil from the skin appears to be able to bring the phthalo out of the plastic. I later found that a tiny tiny dab of lanolin helped this along. But it still requires a lot of effort.

Back to Bobs issue - Basicaly what we now know it that when pallet manufacuters use the work "enamel" they lie. They don't mean REAL enamel, high temp melted glass, as in an "enamel bowl" that can chip easily, but is pretty much unstainable, they mean - "Enamel Paint" - which means 'paint which MIGHT be slightly more restistant to staining that "normal" Paint'.

[Sigh]

Bobar57
03-09-2011, 12:38 PM
And the moral to this story is...........

Mix on your paper,
not on your palette........
Neeman,I normally mix in my paper no the palette,but the mixing wels are used to obtain the right amount of pigment/water mixture I need or the right dilution for the desired value.Understand what I used them for?
Hi Roger:wave:,long time without seeing you.
Yes there is a huge difference in enamels.What I discovered is that there is paint enamel and baked enamel.The enamel you find in butcher trays and some cooking pots is baked.It's a hard finish,not easily chipped,scratched or stained.The Holbein palettes and I suspect the C.Young too are also covered with baked enamel.
This "Spanish" palette isn't,is paint enamel and as such,scratch,chip and stain easily.

Bob

Mayberry
03-09-2011, 02:22 PM
Well, to be totally clear, there is paint enamel, baked paint enamel, and porcelain (glass) enamel ("real" enamel).

Bobar57
03-09-2011, 04:58 PM
Later I want to post a thread about the enamel in the Craig Young palettes and paintboxes,but since I don't have any yet,I feel that is kind of embarrassing giving my opinion or even posting about something I don't have any experience with.
I better wait until I have one and then I will feel qualified to give my opinion,based on experience.

I don't like to post about something I don't even have a clue.

Bob

PS For all about to rock,I salute you:music:

PainterRon
03-09-2011, 04:58 PM
I admit to having ocassionally, over the years, tried to get the stains off my cheapo-crappo palettes and using S.O.S. pads...

Mayberry
03-09-2011, 05:21 PM
Bob, you might want to check out discussions about Craig Young and Holbein palettes on the Painters Online website. For example:
https://www.painters-online.co.uk/forums/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=233&posts=10

Bobar57
03-09-2011, 05:32 PM
Thanks a lot Kathy,I'll check it now.
Ron,it's perfectly normal to palettes to get stained,and is acceptable too...as long as there is daily use (give or take) to it and you are talking of major staining colors as phtalos.But for a single use,with a cadmium yellow and a palette that has only two mixing areas,this is an inconvenience and annoyance.Imagine if were a phtalo blue color?And when you have only two mixing areas and you want to mix on the palette I don't think that a yellowish background will be pleasurable to you if you're mixing,lets say blues.You will, see probably greenish colors instead of the intended one.Get my drift?
I think is a valid point in this specific type of palette.
I will not worry much with the new Holbein 500.Why?Cause it has 5 mixing areas,one get stained blue?Fine,I just mix my blues from now on in that well.I think I'm clear as water and not as mud.

Bob