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Adrienne
02-26-2003, 06:44 PM
A couple of days ago, one of the forums was talking about a gorgeous painting inspired by the song "Nights in White Satin." Another thread was talking about poetry. These got me thinking about the synergy between artwork and words.

Sometimes my artwork is infused with thoughts that come from reading, although nobody but me could ever know that. But on this thread, we can put words with our artwork - either our words or someone else's. I think that together, they can be more than they are apart.

This is a detail from my 2002-2003 WIP currently titled "The Memory of Wind." The painting is dedicated to my horse, Wind River. The words are by one of my favorite poets, Rumi.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/26-Feb-2003/14141-WC-Rumi.jpg

Please join in, any way you can think of - any way you wish!

Peace,

Adrienne

Bobartist
02-26-2003, 09:47 PM
Hi Adrienne,

Made me think of some things I read once in Artists on Art from the XIV to the XX Century. Has some poetry by Michelangelo but also here and there discussions about the relationship of poetry to art. Reminds me, too of when I am painting (not much lately) how it perks up my creativity and I MUST WRITE also... lol.

Yes all these ways to pass around ideas and feelings have to be related, just different vehicles, huh?

Adrienne
02-27-2003, 09:46 AM
Yes all these ways to pass around ideas and feelings have to be related, just different vehicles, huh?
Yes, I think you're right. I read somewhere about artists' need to be acknowledged (viewed or read or heard), and how strong this need is. I was so surprised at the example the author gave. He mentioned that Arthur Rubinstein was so anxious to be heard that it was all he could do to restrain himself from going out in the hallway and paying the elevator operator to come in and listen to him practice. Rubinstein was an acclaimed pianist, one of the most accomplished and famous of our time. Yet he apparently felt the same needs and yearnings as the rawest beginner among us here at Wet Canvas. I used to wonder why we talk so much about our non-verbal efforts (painting, etc.) I think it is partly our need for acknowledgement, and partly the other side of our creativity, the verbal part, that needs equal time. It's interesting that you respond to this need so naturally:
Reminds me, too of when I am painting (not much lately) how it perks up my creativity and I MUST WRITE also

Does this work in reverse too? When you write, do you end up needing to paint?

Adrienne

Rose Queen
02-27-2003, 11:55 PM
I have always had a facility with words, but only recently started to paint. Having gone through The Artist's Way program, I am still amazed at how writing can act to prime the pump of creativity. I don't know why it works, but work it does!

Still, I find myself gravitating to bookbinding and trying to figure out how to integrate words into my books without letterpress or other conventional print means. I'm dipping my toe into altering books, too. This tells me I can't get too far away from words. I like the piece you posted and I hope you will post more of them so we can learn from the way you integrate the two.



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Adrienne
02-28-2003, 12:25 AM
Still, I find myself gravitating to bookbinding and trying to figure out how to integrate words into my books without letterpress or other conventional print means.
Rose Queen, This sounds very interesting. How did you originally get involved in binding your own books? Do you make special papers for that with you artwork on them?

Tell us more,

Adrienne

Adrienne
02-28-2003, 12:26 AM
I like the piece you posted and I hope you will post more of them so we can learn from the way you integrate the two.
I think I may have inadvertently given a false impression here. The details from paintings I've posted in these threads don't, in real life, have words integrated into them. I just added the words in Photoshop, for fun, just before I posted them here. No need for anyone else to add the words in this manner to participate in the thread!!!

Just toss up your artwork, type the words like a regular forum post, and let us share your work and feelings!!! :p :cool:

Thank you Rose,

Adrienne

Adrienne
02-28-2003, 01:14 AM
A few decades ago, when I was in high school, all my charcoal paintings were
destroyed by vandals. They were at the school to be matted for a one-person exhibit at the school. They were all of horses except one of a black child crying, which apparently provided the excuse in my racist high school to smear swear words across all of my paintings. My entire life's work to that time was ruined in a few cruel strokes.

I didn't pick up a charcoal again for 20 or 25 years.

Eventually, I acquired Painter... but was desperately afraid to start over, and paralyzed with fear. A year later I did one sketch (my horse). A year later I did one more (my horse's eye). I gave up.

Fortunately something happened on an art list I subscribed to that changed my life forever. There was trouble on the list. Everyone got along except the owner of the list. Efforts were made to reason. They failed. In protest, one of the other artists' posted the spoken portion of the words from "Nights in White Satin" by the Moody Blues:

...cold hearted orb that rules the night;
removes the colors from our sight.
Red is gray and yellow white.
But we decide which is right
and which is an illusion...

For some reason, in addition to mirroring our feelings about the list owner, those words became a catalyst to me. I drew the freehand study of a Jaguar's eye below in response to reading those words. This seems like such a small step, but it was the first thing I'd ever done in color. Somehow, taking that step thawed years of paralysis and brought me back to a life of creativity - but in brand new directions.

The power of words cannot be underestimated.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/28-Feb-2003/14141-WC-Jag.jpg

Adrienne

Rose Queen
02-28-2003, 02:27 AM
Originally posted by Adrienne Rose Queen, This sounds very interesting. How did you originally get involved in binding your own books? Do you make special papers for that with you artwork on them?

Tell us more,

Adrienne

Well, this may turn out to be an example of TMI (too much information), but about three years ago I decided to retire from my job and enjoy life, only to be blindsided by a cancer diagnosis. Spending the first year of retirement (which I had always imagined would be filled with travel, leisurely lunches with friends, and sleeping in without interference from alarm clocks) in surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and recovering from all three was a pretty sobering experience.

I don't know why, but I looked to art for help in healing; help, really, in not living my life the way I had to date, but finding a new and better way of spending my remaining years. I started taking watercolor classes and, when a local bookstore offered bookmaking classes, I just leapt! I found it instantly satisfying; although I suppose some may call it a craft, the design, selection of papers, covers, binding -- these all seem more art than craft to me. I really don't care which it is, actually.

I have made some of my own papers, but I've wound up using them in collage and I didn't find the experience of making paper compelling enough to stick with. There are so many beautiful papers available now that I'd rather focus on selecting, combining and complementing what's available to make something unique and beautiful.

I was horrified to read the story of your work being destroyed and so sad to hear that it stopped you from creating for so many, many years! What a waste and so senseless. Anyway, I'm glad to welcome another 'recovering artist' to the Creativity forum. Somebody just gave me Photoshop Elements, which I am just as terrified of as you were of Painter, but by damn, I'm going to face it down! Just think of the books I could make...



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Adrienne
02-28-2003, 04:26 AM
Rose Queen,

I was really moved by your story. You are such a brave woman, choosing to bring good from a frightening diagnosis, despite everything you've been through.

Thank you for sharing that here. Remember to drink plenty of filtered water and take your herbs and supplements. 5-8 glasses of water a day has been shown in a couple of studies to reduce cancer reoccurrence by (if I remember correctly) somewhere in the vicinity of 40-70%, which is an astonishing figure. And of course, keep your circulation going with walking and stretching to get the water and herbs into all your crannies (via lymph and blood and air)!!!

Great cancer reoccurrence prevention herbs include turmeric, centella asiatica, gingko, pau d'arco, astragalus, milk thistle, Indole 3-Carbinol, green tea (in no particular order), and even marshmallow, hawthorn and ginger.

A great resource for combined protocols is: http://www.lef.org/ (Life Extension Foundation).

They don't grind the natural ax or the traditional ax. Instead, the protocols they provide on their website emphasis that most cancer survivors are those who intelligently study the issue and gain assistance from both doctors and supplements. The have some very technical, but very specific recommendations regarding cancer, and even provide letters for you to print and carry to your doctors detailing effective protocols, since so many doctors are lazy with regard to both studying and procedures.

One of Deepak Chopra's tapes, "An Ancient Magical Prayer," might be especially meaningful to you as well.

If you are up to your ears in advice, and are rolling your eyes by now, please accept my apology for my forwardness. I don't want to make things worse for you. It's so hard to know how much to say on this electronic medium we share :angel:

You mentioned both watercolor classes and bookmaking classes. Do you have photos of either, or both, that you could post here? I would love to see both of your art forms, if you wanted to share them here.

Do any of your creations relate to your recovery from illness? Do your thoughts about life and death influence what you create?
I was horrified to read the story of your work being destroyed and so sad to hear that it stopped you from creating for so many, many years! What a waste and so senseless.
I have moments where I am still saddened by this. I feel the loss of two of the charcoals especially deeply. But the intervening years were not wasted. They were filled with incredible relationships with my horse and cats, family and friends, mountains and environs... And perhaps my new painting effort would never have taken me to the interesting places it has, if I had continued on the course I was on back then. I believe that in the field of infinite possibilities, I've always been where I was supposed to be.

Peace,

Adrienne

Gisele
02-28-2003, 08:09 AM
Hi Adrienne and everyone, I find this thread very interesting. I feel that in order to paint I need to be connected through the heart. Reading historical biographies has made me feel alive again and gave me the inner knowing of "one day I will be painting people and scenes that will help people heal"...

For me, past life accounts and history have always been a source of inspiration.

Gisele:)

Rose Queen
02-28-2003, 11:02 AM
Adrienne, thank you for your kind concern and your advice, which I know comes from a good place. I am three years out from my surgery and doing very well, certainly taking better care of myself!

Some of my books are shown in this post: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=71010

I haven't got a scanner or a digital camera, so my postings are few and far between on WetCanvas, but here are two of the watercolors I've posted:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/05-Aug-2002/birdofparadise.jpg

and

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Jan-2002/001.jpg



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teresasart
02-28-2003, 11:27 AM
Rose Queen- I was touched by the story of how you came to do art. Life is so strange, how the path can wander in directions we never would have thought we would choose... only to find we enjoy where it takes us. Sometimes bad things can bring about something good. Likewise with Adrienne's experience with her works being defaced.

Sometimes it seems to me that our creative endeavors (art, music, poetry, whatever the medium or form they take) are in many ways an expression of who we really are at the core. I often find that when I am inspired to write (which is actually what I studied to do- now I'm an artist- ha!), I am also inspired to draw, paint, or sculpt... And there are times when I can't seem to get to the right "place" mentally to do any of those things. I compare it to what athletes call "the zone", but the creative equivalent... that mental place where one loses oneself in the act of creating; when one loses all sense of time, and there is nothing but you and your art, and your hands moving to create, as if on their own. I wondered if other artists felt this way, and then I read a quote by Van Gogh:

"Emotions are sometimes so strong that one works without knowing one works, when sometimes the strokes come with a sequence and a coherence like words in a speech or a letter, then one must remember that it has not always been so, and that in the time to come there will again be heavy days, empty of inspiration."

Teresa

erik_satie_rolls
03-01-2003, 05:59 AM
Rose, this is a very thought provoking thread. Once, while I had the flu, I did a post-modern self portrait. It was large, about 20X28 and I think done in watercolor. I put stick notes on it, on which I had written words from an old anonymous haiku:

Leaf alone, fluttering


Alas, leaf alone,



fluttering...





floating down the wind.



I don't usually ascribe words to my work, I even hate titles, but this seemed appropriate to me, given the fact of my feeling while doing the self portrait.

erik satie rollerblading

erik_satie_rolls
03-01-2003, 06:01 AM
Sorry, ADRIENNE - (with submissions from Rose Queen and others) this is a very thought provoking thread.

:-)

erik satie rollerblading

Adrienne
03-01-2003, 09:01 AM
I feel that in order to paint I need to be connected through the heart. Reading historical biographies has made me feel alive again and gave me the inner knowing of "one day I will be painting people and scenes that will help people heal"...

For me, past life accounts and history have always been a source of inspiration.
Gisele,

I was intrigued to read your comments. Can you share some of the lives and histories that have influenced you? And it would be neat to see an example of a painting you've done that was influenced by one of those lives...

Very curious,

Adrienne

Adrienne
03-01-2003, 09:26 AM
Rose:

Some of my books are shown in this post: http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/sho...&threadid=71010
Rose Queen, your bookmaking efforts are really neat. That piano hinge thingamajig one is awesome!!! :D Thank you for posting those watercolors here too. That flower especially grabbed me. Very nice :angel: Thank you for sharing them with us here.

Teresa:

I wondered if other artists felt this way, and then I read a quote by Van Gogh:

"Emotions are sometimes so strong that one works without knowing one works, when sometimes the strokes come with a sequence and a coherence like words in a speech or a letter, then one must remember that it has not always been so, and that in the time to come there will again be heavy days, empty of inspiration."

What I neat quote. I will remember it when I need reminding that many others have walked even the most difficult parts of the same path we are on, so we are never alone. I feel the whisperings of those spirits, still among us, helping us muddle through, reminding me of my connections.

Adrienne

Adrienne
03-01-2003, 09:46 AM
Leaf alone, fluttering
Alas, leaf alone,
fluttering...
floating down the wind.
This is an eerie poem. I'd love to see your self-portrait. Do you still have it? Could you scan it in to us? Do you remember where you found the poem?

Very curious again,

Adrienne

teresasart
03-01-2003, 09:59 AM
By the way Rose, I have always wanted to try bookbinding. There are some wonderful examples from the Middle Ages which are bound in leather that is covered in exquisite repousse designs. I've used the technique, but never tried doing a book.

Adrienne
03-01-2003, 10:09 AM
What is repousse?

Is your cool tinyhead an example of repousse?
Can you post one of your pieces?

Ever curious,

Adrienne

teresasart
03-01-2003, 11:17 AM
Hi Adrienne,

My tinyhead is actually part of a painting I did, of a woman in 12th c. dress standing in an interior doorway of a castle. It's the closest thing I have done to a self portrait.

Repousse (should be an accent over that ending "e", but I don't know how to put it there on a PC, only on a Mac) is a technique commonly seen in leather items from the Middle Ages. Basically whereas normal leather "tooling" (applying surface decoration to the leather when it is damp by making impressions in it) is done from the front, repousse entails also raising portions of the design from the back. They were generally supported by filling the area with something such as leather, gesso, or string to prevent the area from being flattened later through use, so the technique appears often on books, wooden cases covered in leather, fancy shields, and other items where the leather is supported by a rigid material. A good example of this is the Stonyhust Gospel, the oldest surviving example of English bookbinding (7th C.). I can't post a picture of it here (copyrighted pictures). This was done in goatskin, and has a simple vine motif, which is likely supported from behind by string. I have pics of some of my Medieval reproduction work here somewhere, but I use a lot of the same techniques to do my sculptural pieces. There are pics of those on my web site. (The tinyhead painting is there too. If it's a self portrait, I guess I have a tiny head!) :D

I hope I have answeed your question without yakking too much!

Teresa

edited for typos....

teresasart
03-01-2003, 11:19 AM
PS- Found this link which has a pic of the Stonyhust Gospel:

http://itsa.ucsf.edu/~snlrc/britannia/lindisfarne/stonyhurst.html

misslone
03-01-2003, 11:33 PM
Rose, Teresa, Adrienne --great thread....

I've been "rebirthed" to photography after a long absence, through a funny way, like Teresa mentioned; I had taken a mild interest in the changing technology, purchasing my first digital camera a few years ago. The new medium was just starting to make real headway and inroads into the art world, and digital darkrooms were becoming studios of choice. At first, having seen the doctoring you can do in a digital darkroom, I often wondered about the "legitimacy" that digicams were going to have in the marketplace, and how long before I'd have to consider not ever getting one, cause the breeds might go discontinued.

Well, I hung in, and within a few months shy of year two of their debuts, I purchased my first Canon Elph. I've never looked back since that time. The digital darkroom programs have gotten bigger and better, and so have the megapixel wonders (I heard the future looks bright for a 12 mp, as my friend told me) and I can hardly wait.

I even entered a stock photo contest/site for the first time in my life, and have been picked not only for the stock photo album to be published this month, but also based on that photo I have been picked to be featured in their best of 2003 book, which I even checked with some people who I know entered, to really see if they were legit about "we don't ask everybody"....and they don't!

So now, I'm renewed, rejuvenated, and rejoicing in art once again, and how its a medium of pictures painting a thousand words, like David Gates sang about.....:clap:

Rose Queen
03-02-2003, 02:30 PM
Originally posted by misslone ...and digital darkrooms were becoming studios of choice. At first, having seen the doctoring you can do in a digital darkroom...

Excuse my ignorance (I haven't got a digicam, but it's on my 'soon' list...), but what is a "digital darkroom?" Is it those photo manip programs (like Photoshop, Painter, etc.) or something else?

So now, I'm renewed, rejuvenated, and rejoicing in art once again, and how it's a medium of pictures painting a thousand words, like David Gates sang about.

Whatever it takes, we're delighted to welcome another renewed, rejuvenated, and rejoicing artist among us! :clap: :clap: :clap:



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misslone
03-02-2003, 06:42 PM
...yes, Rose, Adobe, Ulead, and other Photoshop type software programs are lumped under the guise of digital darkrooms, saving sans the blackout bulb lighting one has to endure under the procuring of their 35mm film cartridges.

As a budding digital procurer of cropping, editing, colorizing, and other textually effective goodies in the goodie box, I find these programs have really initiated a new realm of art afficionado of a new century......and with all the trappings of the traditional film photographer versus the digital photographer....I think there is still that tiny struggle where the two genres might laugh at each other a little ...but not much...!

I love these programs, because as I have this small visual impairment, it really allows me the functionality to zoom in on one aspect ratio of the shot I took, and see a spot which either needs "cosmetic surgery" or to discover something else in the picture as I'm editing....

...And thank you for being so kind....you are all truly inspirational and energizing....

DeaBella
03-03-2003, 03:08 AM
Quote:

I wondered if other artists felt this way, and then I read a quote by Van Gogh:

"Emotions are sometimes so strong that one works without knowing one works, when sometimes the strokes come with a sequence and a coherence like words in a speech or a letter, then one must remember that it has not always been so, and that in the time to come there will again be heavy days, empty of inspiration."


:eek:
Wow, that is a great quote. Thank you for posting that. I love the theme of this thread. Words and images are so very connected for me. I get most of my inspiration from music. (I listen to both kinds: country AND western :) - old joke, sorry :) I also like other types, especially Paul Simon) Anyway, writing a plays a large part for me. I try to write:
* 3 pages every morning (per Artist Way).
Also, every night I write:
* 3 ideas for my art without judgement (per Cay Lang, author of "Taking the Leap" I love what she said about them: "The ideas don't have to be good ones....within a week or two a pattern will begin to emerge. As you browse your journal, you will notice that some of your ideas aren't so bad, some are truly stupid, and some actually seem deep and important" The relief was that others also have ideas that "are truly stupid" - I love that),
* 3 wishes (just to keep my inner art child happy and dreaming) and
* 3 gratefuls (it really helps open up the cosmos somehow to be grateful).

Anyway, that is my 2 cents. Thanks for the great thread.

--Dea :cat:

Adrienne
03-03-2003, 03:20 AM
Dea,

Those are great ideas. Like daily food for the creative soul or something.

Teresa,

I enjoyed your website and also reading about the Stonyhust Gospel. I had no idea...

Misslone,

Your enthusiasm is very contagious. I just bought a digital camera myself and I may take it in more directions than I expected because of your comments. I've only been using it for family photos - but maybe I could incorporate photography into my artwork. I don't know. My brother is an incredible wilderness photographer and I don't want to compete with him, but still, your descriptions energize my desire to explore.

Wet Canvasers,

Earlier today, I decided to swear off of WetCanvas for a week but here I am back again. Thanks for the wonderful worlds you all keep opening up to me. I love this place,

Adrienne

Adrienne
03-03-2003, 04:09 AM
Here's a close-up detail from my 2003 painting "Nearing the Pond."

The haiku I've added for this post is from junior high or high school days. It's my only poem.

teresasart
03-03-2003, 09:23 AM
This is a really great thread... I am enjoying reading how everyone here approaches their creativity. When I find myself in one of those days "empty of inspiration", it seems to help to have an exchange of ideas with other artists. Before WC this only happened at shows... now I can have that exchange in between too. :clap:

Teresa

PS- Dea, I think the trick is in knowing which ideas are truly stupid...! :D

erik_satie_rolls
03-03-2003, 09:40 AM
Adrienne,

Beautiful haiku and painting!

The haiku you asked about is from a book called Japanese Haiku, from Peter Pauper Press, translations by Peter Beilenson, 1955-56.

Here is another one:


Lady Butterfly

Perfumes her wings

By floating

Over the orchid.



--- Basho



.......A colorful image, yet no hues are mentioned ;)

erik

teresasart
03-03-2003, 10:35 AM
Erik- that does have beautiful imagery. They say that the sense of smell is the most powerful of all the senses- perhaps that is why the poem is so evocative.....

misslone
03-03-2003, 11:21 AM
...DeaBella....
....thank you for your kindness, I really do appreciate that. In fact, I brokedown yesterday, and got myself a very affordable digi-camcorder/digicam....it happens to be able to capture up to a full hour of mpeg4 video, which is all I really wanted to breakdown for, not really feeling a regular videocam was right for my intermittant use for when the greatnephews are around, or for quick capture of those sweet, innocent moments...

I was between that, and the binoculars that are a digicam, but figured I'd wait on the binocs....

...Adrienne...
...truly lovely work and haiku; splendidly peaceful and graceful, with subtleties and minute emergences of hues within color...

....WetCanvas just happens to be the best creative community....!

DeaBella
03-03-2003, 04:42 PM
Teresa

PS- Dea, I think the trick is in knowing which ideas are truly stupid...! :D [/B][/QUOTE]


Teresa:

:D Agreed :D

--Dea

Bobartist
03-06-2003, 06:47 PM
Originally posted by Adrienne


Does this work in reverse too? When you write, do you end up needing to paint?

Adrienne
No.
Because of the paraphenalia involved. and etc. However, writing does make me SEE as an artist. I see color, light, pictoral ideas, instead of objects sometimes.
Hey, Adrienne, you know what does make me paint - didn't think of this before - music. For instance, some piano sonatos make painting kinda natural.

My memory is primarily aural and I paint and get lost in the tactility of it, i.e.: the smooth flow of the brush over canvas. But the visual gives me such a thrill! Cerulean blue, cadmium pale red, flocks of birds as they leave the ground. ?
well,

Adrienne
03-09-2003, 06:07 AM
Erik,

Thank you for your kind comments for Nearing the Pond/Haiku.

I loved the Basho haiku you contributed. Very lyrical. I think I remember that poet from my school days.

Misslone,

Thank you for your generous thoughts for Nearing the Pond/Haiku. I'm very glad you enjoyed them.

How are your digicam and gadget experiments going? Could you post something here from your darkroom, along with a poem perhaps? If you do, please tell us if you used any effects or filters, and about the creative decisions involved in your process. I'm very curious...

Bob,

However, writing does make me SEE as an artist.
For me too. So in a way, it goes both directions but expresses differently in each direction.

I see color, light, pictoral ideas, instead of objects sometimes.
Yes!!! I spend a lot of time in non-object-oriented thought. In fact, I spend entirely too much time daydreaming :D

Hey, Adrienne, you know what does make me paint - didn't think of this before - music.
Someone on another forum mentioned the same thing. They couldn't paint without music on. For me, sometimes I need it on, and other times it gets in the way.

But the visual gives me such a thrill! Cerulean blue, cadmium pale red, flocks of birds as they leave the ground. ?
Glorious imagery... swoon thoughts...

Thanks for your inspiring words,

Adrienne

Adrienne
03-11-2003, 12:52 PM
Hi everybody,
Well, misslone has got me using my camera a bit more. Here's a pic of my cat Howie :cat: along with a poem I wrote to her last night. This is only my second poem in my whole life, so bear with !!!

Haiku for Howie

Joy incarnate, the
moment treasured, loving the
leap, touching the sun.

-- Adrienne Swenson
:cat:

teresasart
03-11-2003, 01:27 PM
Howie looks like he's dancing! Cute poem....:cat:

Bendyweed
03-11-2003, 04:16 PM
Andreinne, Howie looks like a cute little devil. Am finding this thread very moving. Usually I try to bury my head in the clouds when it comes to my own painful memorys, ( obviously Howie is telling me to come down and play!) but reading this has made me think that the things the get me down (people, people & people) should take a back seat when I see that without life and health we cannot experience joy or heartbreak. I`ll leave this now and go back to the clouds. Long Live Wc and all it`s trusty followers!:crying:

Adrienne
03-12-2003, 11:43 AM
Teresa,
:D thanks much :cat:

Originally posted by Bendyweed
Andreinne, Howie looks like a cute little devil. Am finding this thread very moving. Usually I try to bury my head in the clouds when it comes to my own painful memorys, ( obviously Howie is telling me to come down and play!) but reading this has made me think that the things the get me down (people, people & people) should take a back seat when I see that without life and health we cannot experience joy or heartbreak. I`ll leave this now and go back to the clouds. Long Live Wc and all it`s trusty followers!:crying:
Bendy, you're breaking my heart here :crying: I'm sorry this thread made you sad. What can I do to make this thread a safer place for people to share their art and words together? I want people to feel safe and happy here, to know that there's hope and to let go of their despair...

Adrienne