PDA

View Full Version : A question about underpainting


Dea
02-23-2011, 03:16 AM
I haven't done an underpainting before and I'm thinking about giving it a go on my next painting. My question is, can I use any sort of paint for an underpainting on Colourfix paper?
Deanna

Yorky
02-23-2011, 04:50 AM
Hi Deanna, I deleted your six duplicate posts.

Doug

*Deirdre*
02-23-2011, 08:01 AM
Thanks Doug! Dea...I expect you mean acrylic or watercolour rather than oils?
As far as I know you can use either of those.

the drover's dog
02-23-2011, 08:02 AM
Gouche, acrylic and thinned oil paints work fine on the darker papers and watercolour is gorgeous on light colours. Best of all is probably pastels applied and then either wet with water or with turpentine. Brush or spray give different results. I've even used Vodka!

Pastels are, after all, only sticks of pure pigment without the carriers found in wet mediums. Avoid using methylated spirits as it dissolves acrylics and the Colourfix is an acrylic surface over watercolour paper. Just don't get too heavy handed with the gouache, acrylic or oils or you will clog the tooth.

Have fun,

Dale

robertsloan2
02-23-2011, 11:53 AM
One thing about underpaintings that I discovered trying to get a metallic effect background. I used Daniel Smith luminescent watercolors to try to create a soft shimmering metallic background to paint on. It turned flat and matte color after I put the Colourfix clear primer over it. When I washed it over the primer, then it came out fine and did give the results I wanted.

So you should know the Colourfix primer will eliminate metallic effects from metallic paints and adjust accordingly. But metallic watercolor can go right over it without filling the tooth in a thin wash, and if the underpainting was the same color it doesn't take much to bring the shine back.

*Deirdre*
02-23-2011, 01:22 PM
I'm surprised that oil paints are used...they take much longer to dry normally, but I suppose if you use a thinner they would dry quicker... so what would be the rationale for using oil paints as against, say acrylics or watercolour:)

westcoast_Mike
02-23-2011, 01:52 PM
When oil is used, it's thinned out to the consistency of tea. Those who use it do so because they prefer the effect they get with a solvent based underpainting as opposed to a water based one. They are usually letting some of the underpainting show through. The pigment also seems a little more intense to me.

*Deirdre*
02-23-2011, 02:38 PM
Aha...now it makes sense, thanks Mike....although I use coloured papers like Colourfix a lot, I've never really got into underpainting, per se....most likely because my application of pastels is heavy, so the base usually doesn't show through. Now I've started again I think I will do my own experiments with under painting and see what happens.

JamieWG
02-23-2011, 04:15 PM
A related question: If I do an acrylic/watercolor/gouache underpainting, and pastel over the top, with some of the underpainting showing too, is it still classified as a pastel, or does it then fall into the vast Mixed Media category? (I mean for show/gallery purposes, as opposed to the WC forum categories.)

Jamie

DAK723
02-23-2011, 07:52 PM
A related question: If I do an acrylic/watercolor/gouache underpainting, and pastel over the top, with some of the underpainting showing too, is it still classified as a pastel, or does it then fall into the vast Mixed Media category? (I mean for show/gallery purposes, as opposed to the WC forum categories.)

Jamie

Most shows that I am aware of stipulate that if 80% of the work is covered with pastel, then its a pastel. If you are entering a specific show it might not hurt to ask the organizers.

Don

Dea
02-25-2011, 03:15 AM
Thanks everyone, some very interesting things for me to think on.
Thanks Doug, I wonder how I got six posts? Ah, the weird stuff that goes on inside this box they call computer:)
Deanna

JamieWG
02-25-2011, 09:38 AM
Most shows that I am aware of stipulate that if 80% of the work is covered with pastel, then its a pastel. If you are entering a specific show it might not hurt to ask the organizers.

Don

Thank you, Don. This makes sense. I've been thinking a lot lately about the work of Ray Balkwill (http://www.raybalkwill.co.uk/paint.htm), which I love! He clearly states "mixed media". Such a great style!

Jamie