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coolwater
02-16-2011, 12:40 AM
Does anyone have Terry Harrison's books??:confused:

I'm thinking to buy,

1) Brush with watercolour

or

2) Painting watercolour landscape
(this one is considered Brush with watercolour 2)


I already have 'Ready to paint watercolour landscape' from
Terry Harrison.

I was wondering if the book 1 has similar paints
from 'ready to paintbook'.

If so, maybe I should buy book 2.

I'm also plannning to buy some of his brushes.
Does anyone have his brushes?

Niki

Yorky
02-16-2011, 03:58 AM
Terry is a good painter and a successful marketeer. His books are excellent tutorials and he has some videos on YouTube I think. His brushes are made to make painting textures easy, but you can get the same effects with an old bristle brush with the bristles "duffed up".

Doug

Irishman
02-16-2011, 09:04 AM
Hi Nicki,
Terry Harrison's books were one of the first I borrowed from my library when I started painting and I found them to be a great confidence booster in that you learn that if you follow his instructions you will be able to make progress.I subsequently bought "Complete Guide To Watercolour Landscapes" because it is a compilation of three or four of his other books and is good value and the instructions are clear and very good.
I also stopped off at his website shop along my journey and bought some brushes not to mention some of his green paint and shadow colour!! The brushes have been used maybe a dozen times whilst the paint, maybe once or twice.The brushes I bought were his bristle type brushes for grass, stippling etc and also a sword liner.To be fair, they are a good quality brush of that type and will do as they say which is as good as it gets I suppose, but as Yorky mentioned, I now know that there are ways to achieve the same effect with other brushes but if one is feeling lazy......A small downside with the brushes is that his earlier ones were painted wooden handles and the paint would peel off very badly and as I say I only used them a few times.I am not sure I would buy any of his sable brushes when good quality sable are available at good prices in Rosemary and Luxartis.
Looking back, buying these products were part of my learning curve because sometimes you have to learn what you don't want in order to learn what you do want.As Yorky also said, he features quite frequently on the SAA Drawing and Painting Channel which is on Youtube at the same time and if you have certain browsers such as Firefox you can download and save them and the videos are sometimes far better than a book.

gardenart
02-16-2011, 10:01 AM
Hi Niki. A friend of mine has bought me 2 Terry Harrison books, one on flowers and one on landscapes.I can't wait to get them.He has some videos on the Artists Network. You can watch previews of them there. He is a very good artist. Not sure about his brushes, I can't remember what tehy look like but I love brushes so will have to check his website.
Will let you know about my books when I get them.
Sue

coolwater
02-16-2011, 03:25 PM
Doug,

Thanks for your reply :wave:

Since I didn't have 'OLD' brushes, I ended up buying some hog brushes
to make some bristle effects.

Looked OK, but not satisfied.
That's whay I was interested in Terry's brushes.

As for his videos, I've seen a lot on Youtube and other art videos.
Pretty interesting stuffs!!
:cat:
Niki

coolwater
02-16-2011, 03:42 PM
Irishman,

How nice to be able to borrow Terry's books at the library!!
Since I live in Italy, I don't have much chance to find his books at
the local library. :crying:




<"Complete Guide To Watercolour Landscapes"
because it is a compilationof three or four of his other books
and is good value and the instructions are clear and very good.



This is sounds great.
I was checking at this book last night, but I wasn't really sure.
Now your review makes me want to order this book.

I also visited his site several times and I was kind of tempted with
his 'shadow' colour.
I could mix it almost the same, but sadly, my mixing ability is not so good
and it isn't same colour everytime.
It is quite hit and miss.:(

The brushes I'm interested in are....

Foliage,
Golden leaf,
Fan Stippler

but I realized if I get a pack of 5 brushes, the cost is 39,99.
So why not get 5 of them???
Ohhhhhh....What a temptation.....

I love to watch his videos.
Since Drawing and Painting Channel sends me some newsletter,
I go in and look for Terry's videos when I have time.
Surely his demonstration on videos are 5 times better than books.
But still, I'm tempted to buy one of his book.
(Yeah, I like the feeling of having books, too.):heart:

Thanks for your comment.

Niki

coolwater
02-16-2011, 03:47 PM
Sue,

Nice to hear from you.
How are you??:cat:


A friend of mine has bought me 2 Terry Harrison books, one on flowers and one on landscapes.I can't wait to get them.

Two books!!!!!!?????:eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

Sue, I'm jelous:envy: :envy: :envy:
and I can't wait to hear your report.

Take care,
Niki :heart:

Flattwo
02-16-2011, 03:47 PM
Hi

I would advise you not to buy these "specialist" brushes, they are a waste of money.

I would also advise you to develop your own style, learn the basics, experiment and practice, practice, practice...without tutorial books! its the only way to develop and individual method, after all, who wants to paint in the style someone else has done before!

Regards

Henry

Irishman
02-16-2011, 07:05 PM
In my opinion, anything,regardless of what it is, that helps you learn,improve and better your abilities,in any thing, cannot be by definition, a waste of time and that includes finding out what doesn't work for you.If you can cut down the time, effort and indeed expense in getting from where you are to where you want to be, it is hard to see what is wrong with that and if a few brushes and a book saves you hundreds of Dollars/Sterling/Euros in paper and paint, go for it. The first book/tutorial I borrowed from the library was by a guy called Frank Clarke and I learnt how to paint a sky and a mountain, then a bit of sea and a cottage and so on.I don't paint like that today but I learnt.He uses a large hake, the idea for which he might well have got from Ron Ranson and I bought one.Still have it, don't use it but it helped me improve.
There are people who paint with ordinary house painter brushes and do a good job but is it right to say then that sable brushes are not needed?John Hoar paints with two brushes, one of which could be said to be specialist brush and I am sure he doesn't care what people think of his choice of brushes.
If painting with a brush regardless of what it is made of works for you, do it.If getting help from a book or DVD or class, helps, great, do it too.God knows, life is too short to be struggling and if others want to take the long way around, let them off.There is well known saying in the music business that says that anyone taught by themselves is taught be a very bad teacher and I for one will take whatever help I can get from wherever.I learnt a lot from Terry Harrison - don't want to paint like him but still learnt a lot and if it cost me a few brushes that I don't use, so???

coolwater
02-17-2011, 03:38 PM
Hi, Henry. :wave:

Thank you for your comment.



I would also advise you to develop your own style,
learn the basics, experiment and practice, practice, practice...
without tutorial books!


You know......
My husband tells me the same thing.
I know you are right, but I have this wall that
I can't break through.
That's why I like tutorial books I guess.

I have a second thought about his brushes now.:wink2:

Niki

coolwater
02-17-2011, 03:53 PM
My dear Irishman, :)

What can I say, you said it all.



In my opinion, anything,regardless of what it is,
that helps you learn,improve and better your abilities,in any thing,
cannot be by definition, a waste of time and that includes finding out
what doesn't work for you.If you can cut down the time,
effort and indeed expense in getting from where you are to
where you want to be, it is hard to see what is wrong with that
and if a few brushes and a book saves you hundreds of Dollars/
Sterling/Euros in paper and paint, go for it.

God knows, life is too short to be struggling
and if others want to take the long way around, let them off.



I was having such difficult time to learn to paint,
when I finally came across T.Harrison's book.
Following his instruction helped me to improve my
painting.

I started to paint 2 years ago, but I was always frustrated
because I couldn't draw, and my watercolour paints were
really terrible.

When my pleasure time(hobby) became such a stress,
I even wondered if my choice of past time was
the right one.

Knowing Terry's book really took this stress out of me.
I'm learning.
Yes, slowly, but painting time became my relaxing time.
That's the way has to be, right??

As for brushes, I am having second thought.
We'll see :rolleyes:

Thanks again your kind comment.
Niki

shipbroker
02-19-2011, 02:06 AM
Thirty years ago I used to go to a night-school for painting,as no room at home then, and after the first week the lecturer.....a former senior schoolteacher, said 'get on with what you want,when you want and I will offer advice,if and when needed'......This meant we all developed our own styles,for those that had not already got one.....there were no specialised 'fan brushes etc' just a big wash brush,usually a shaving or decorators brush,and a random collection of assorted size normal point brushes....no squirrel,sable just standard art shop stock.....which is what he used himself.

He was very happy if you brought a picture along for a guide and would describe how certain effects could be made.....but no videos (no CD's around then) and no 'how to paint books'....so that is the path I have followed. I do have some books,usually charity shop or Christmas presents..but apart from pastels,which are a disaster to me!...I have not looked in any for at least three year....

In otherwords...I'm with Henry on this....but then I'm quite old now and not up to 'new fangled things'.....

rgds
geoff

coolwater
02-19-2011, 03:20 PM
Hi, Geoff :wave:

Thank you for your comment.

Your story is very interesting.

Come to think of it, it is true that there weren't these
fancy brushes and instructional books available
when 'Big artists' were around.
(I'm talking about Leonardo and Michelangelo, for example)

They didn't even have good quality of papers and paints.
But still, they could paint such wonderful masterpieces.

About the style, I don't think I'm even that level yet.
I would like to have my style one day, but for now
I'm just happy to learn from certain artists' styles and
getting more confidence with this medium.;)

Niki

shipbroker
02-19-2011, 03:52 PM
Whatever you do Niki...enjoy your art and don't suffer for it!!

cheers

geoff

coolwater
02-20-2011, 02:41 AM
Geoff,

Thanks again for your kind words! :thumbsup:
Have a nice Sunday.

Niki