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silvermoss
02-06-2011, 01:33 AM
I am learning about watercolour, and one technique recommended by a botanical artist is to use white gouache for fine detail (tinted with colour if needed). I have heard that Holbein is good, but I am confused by why they have so many different whites:
* Primary white
* Permanent white
* Zinc white
(they also have pearl white, which i think i can exclude).

Which white for what?:confused:

And what is the difference between using white gouache and white watercolor?

Thanks for any suggestions

HarvestMoon
02-06-2011, 10:56 AM
Cath- Holbein gouache is opaque watercolor, and has a matte finish. It tends to be a bit 'chalky' as compared with watercolor. It does not darken, bleed, or crack. Most watercolor is transparent, and it is the fact that the gouache is opaque that makes it useful on top of traditional watercolor, where reserving tiny hairs in a plant with the white of the paper, for example, would be difficult.

Primary White and Permanant white contain Titanium, which is the most brilliant of the white pigments. It is considered the best all-around white. I cannot find my tubes of these this AM to give you any more details, but either should be good for an opaque white.

Zinc White is a semi-transparent white gouache. It would be good mixed with other colors.

Pearl White is a white that has a shiny surface, due to having mica, a natural mineral that is flaky and sparkly in it.

Studio-1-F
02-06-2011, 12:09 PM
Which white for what?:confused:
Cath, here is the quote from the W&N FAQ site (http://www.winsornewton.com/main.aspx?PageID=266&path=products%2fgouache%2fdesigners-gouache%2ffrequently-asked-questions%2f#o2):
What are the uses for the various whites in the Gouache range?
Permanent White is the whitest most opaque white but is not recommended for colour mixing. Zinc White produces the cleanest, most lightfast tints. Bleedproof White prevents underlayers from bleeding through, particularly those colours marked ‘BI’ on the colour chart. And finally, Process White is for photographic retouching, where it will reproduce its true value.

This leaves out "Titanium" white. That's among the whites available from Graham and others. What this is for, I dunno.

Hope this helps. I had this exact same Q a while ago.

Oh, and "white gouache and white watercolor" are the same thing, in my mind.

Jan

Faafil
02-07-2011, 11:31 AM
Cath, great question, and great responses. I didn't know the differences either.


Linda - should this go in the Watermedia Library under gouache??

trapper36
02-03-2013, 11:38 PM
Cath, here is the quote from the W&N FAQ site (http://www.winsornewton.com/main.aspx?PageID=266&path=products%2fgouache%2fdesigners-gouache%2ffrequently-asked-questions%2f#o2):
What are the uses for the various whites in the Gouache range?
Permanent White is the whitest most opaque white but is not recommended for colour mixing. Zinc White produces the cleanest, most lightfast tints. Bleedproof White prevents underlayers from bleeding through, particularly those colours marked ‘BI’ on the colour chart. And finally, Process White is for photographic retouching, where it will reproduce its true value.

This leaves out "Titanium" white. That's among the whites available from Graham and others. What this is for, I dunno.

Hope this helps. I had this exact same Q a while ago.

Oh, and "white gouache and white watercolor" are the same thing, in my mind.

Jan

How about Chinese White?

janinco
02-16-2013, 10:25 PM
Chinese White is the same as Zinc White. I've been doing a little painting with gouache and find that zinc white is best for blending. It has poor coverage over a dark. Titanium white is good for highlights and white areas, but I still find it's better if I preserve the white area on the paper before applying white (like in watercolor) rather than painting over another color.

When I want a really white area, especially if I might want to paint over it, I use Bombay white India ink. Once it's dry it stays put. Bleedproof white is similar, but I have found that it will run a bit and pick up the color underneath.

Jan

Studio-1-F
02-17-2013, 11:55 AM
Thanks, Jan, for the clarification. (It's such a bother to have to keep up with all these marketing-driven color names! = sigh = )

Zinc white = for blending/mixing
Titanium white = for denser areas of very opaque color (nice for impasto-like highlights)

:thumbsup:

Jan