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Keith Russell
02-03-2011, 11:25 AM
I heard someone claim, recently, that a toxic chemical additive is necessary for safflower oil to dry. The claim seems false to me, since I believe that safflower is considered a drying oil (like walnut & linseed oils). I searched Google, but couldn't find any information to support--or refute--this claim.

Can anyone post a link (or cite a book or article) which shows whether this claim is, or is not, the case?

Thanks.

schravix
02-03-2011, 12:21 PM
I heard someone claim, recently, that a toxic chemical additive is necessary for safflower oil to dry. The claim seems false to me, since I believe that safflower is considered a drying oil (like walnut & linseed oils). I searched Google, but couldn't find any information to support--or refute--this claim.

Can anyone post a link (or cite a book or article) which shows whether this claim is, or is not, the case?

Thanks.

Safflower oil toxic? False.

sidbledsoe
02-03-2011, 12:28 PM
Max, he said the additive is toxic, not safflower oil itself. I have read that driers are often added to safflower oil (and in other slow drying oil paints) to speed the drying which is slower than linseed, what those driers are, I don't know, but some driers are toxic, such as those containing lead.
I would consume safflower oil from any grocery store even with anti-oxidants added that may not be listed on the label, but never from any art store where any safflower oil product may contain small amounts of driers, though they also may not be listed on the label.

Mark Sheeky
02-03-2011, 02:43 PM
There's probably no definitive answer. It's probably best to contact the manufacturer of the safflower oil in question and ask them if driers have been added. Cobalt driers are perhaps the most common, added to most house paint.

Mark

schravix
02-03-2011, 03:08 PM
Max, he said the additive is toxic, not safflower oil itself. I have read that driers are often added to safflower oil (and in other slow drying oil paints) to speed the drying which is slower than linseed, what those driers are, I don't know, but some driers are toxic, such as those containing lead.
I would consume safflower oil from any grocery store even with anti-oxidants added that may not be listed on the label, but never from any art store where any safflower oil product may contain small amounts of driers, though they also may not be listed on the label.

I've never purchased any drying oil that had additives in it. I can special order oil with additional drier because they will put it in as an additive. They won't store it that way because of the reduced shelf life. You will be hard pressed to find high-linoleic safflower oil in the grocery store.

sidbledsoe
02-03-2011, 05:30 PM
I've never purchased any drying oil that had additives in it. I can special order oil with additional drier because they will put it in as an additive. They won't store it that way because of the reduced shelf life. You will be hard pressed to find high-linoleic safflower oil in the grocery store.
The raw material binding oil and it's makeup isn't necessarily the end product that the artist uses, it is most often the oil paint itself. I have purchased oil paints with slow drying binding oils such as safflower or sunflower oil (Lukas is one brand) that do add driers. Whether they buy the oil with driers or add it during the process, I don't know, but they contain driers and they do claim it, such as here in this description (http://www.aswexpress.com/discount-art-supplies/oil-paints/lukas.html). You will be even harder pressed to find safflower oil in the grocery store with any toxic driers added regardless of the fatty acid profile.

schravix
02-03-2011, 06:27 PM
The raw material binding oil and it's makeup isn't necessarily the end product that the artist uses, it is most often the oil paint itself. I have purchased oil paints with slow drying binding oils such as safflower or sunflower oil (Lukas is one brand) that do add driers. Whether they buy the oil with driers or add it during the process, I don't know, but they contain driers and they do claim it, such as here in this description (http://www.aswexpress.com/discount-art-supplies/oil-paints/lukas.html). You will be even harder pressed to find safflower oil in the grocery store with any toxic driers added regardless of the fatty acid profile.
No doubt Sid. My official position is Don't ingest art materials
It's my guess, from their product description, that Lukas is using either cobalt or manganese, and perhaps zirconium drier. I don't use any driers in the manufacturing process, it reduces shelf life. I do retail driers separately though, if handled properly they can be useful, especially for primer.