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View Full Version : Bogart Lino : Finished!


Christobal
02-02-2003, 06:19 AM
Jesus! What a work I had :)
Over the nine prints of the first stage, only three were good after the the second print :mad:
Here is the result, with a question : What is the commercial value of such a work, knowing it is 28x37cm (1 inch=2.54cm)

Chris

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Feb-2003/15272-bogart-lino-cut-4.jpg

talkingbanana
02-03-2003, 03:28 PM
I like it! :D I have no idea about the commercial value, though . . .

Hey, at least you got three good prints! I'm lucky to get one good print. :p

Gisela
02-03-2003, 09:52 PM
The finished product is WONDERFUL!! :)

As far as commercial value goes...you might have a problem there. I guessing that you worked from photos that were taken by someone else? I'm guessing that because I'm sure I've seen these particular pictues of Bogart before.
The original photographer owns (most likely) the copyright on these images, or it might be owned by the studios or even Bogie's heirs. Unless you have permission to use these images, you'd be violating copyright if you try and sell this.

A couple of years ago, an artist did a drawing of the Three Stooges and printed it onto T-shirts. The heirs sued his pants off..or maybe it was his shirt?

FYI

Gisela

Christobal
02-04-2003, 04:19 AM
I see...

I had to photograph Boggie myself. The problem is that I wasn't born when he died :D
Thank you for drawing my attention to this problem!
Next time it will be a self-portrait!!!

:D :D :D

Chris

coolartsybabe
02-10-2003, 01:53 PM
When I was younger, I used famous people as subjects in my art all the time. Once I became aware of copyright issues I only used them as subjects for my own "practice" art. I'd never even show them publicly now.

The copyrights on the photos and images of Bogart are most likely owned by movie studios, heirs, photographers, authors of books on Bogart, etc. There may even be a copyright on Bogart's image itself so even if you did go through the time tunnel, you still couldn't use it. Unless you had a licensing agreement.

From time to time I'll do an art piece with a famous person in it for a friend. But I let them know that they can never ever show it outside of their home.

What I'd like to find is a book of public domain photos and images of our esteemed famous favorites.

sassybird
02-16-2003, 03:51 AM
Yes, selling them would be copyright infringement, but giving them as gifts would be a great idea (hint hint) :D Seriously though, using them as a learning experience is not a violation. Sharing them here with all of us, and talking about your trials and errors is good education IMHO. I think you did a wonderful job.

Don't worry about only getting three good prints from the image. I always print at least 10 or 15 of my first color. That way if I screw up in my registration on the other colors I can still come out with a decent number in the edition. If you are having trouble with registration I know a number of tricks that might help, and I am sure other members can offer advice also.

Christobal
02-16-2003, 05:30 AM
Thank you for your comments!
Sassybird, I'd like to know those tricks, for the next time.
Chris

coolartsybabe
02-16-2003, 04:30 PM
Yes, Sassybird! Please, share your block print registration secrets with us. I'm looking at trying three color (black, white, & one other color). The only way I can figure how to do it is to cut and remove the area for the separate color, ink it, then insert it back into place then printing.

Another thought I've had is just being careful in creating my block. To make the different areas easy to ink with a small brayer.

It just seems more difficult to do multi-color block prints than silk screens or etchings.

sassybird
02-18-2003, 05:14 AM
There are several ways to get your registration right.

One is a the technique that Japanese block printers use. On the top and bottom cut a squaring corner, one to the left and one to the right. Make sure that your lino lays in it flush and snug. For the paper draw corners on the paper under the lino as a guide.

You can also use the photographic corner method with the paper as you would with the lino corners. At the corners where you have drawn out your paper template put some of the photographic corners down. They are already sticky, and will stay in place. Slide your paper into these corners. I suggest you use them on all four corners with the paper. You can pick these photographic corners in places like Radio Shack, any photography supply store, and sometimes in stores like WalMart on occassion.

Another technique if you are using a press is to have a piece of plexiglass on the press bed that you can lift and put a template under. I use this for my intaglio prints. I block the size of the paper on a piece of newsprint then place the plate where I want it to print on the paper and trace around it. This gives a simple guide to follow when you are ready to pull a print. It works well for lino and intaglio.