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View Full Version : is thick liquin fatter than thin no liquin?


shawn gibson
08-23-2000, 12:25 AM
I'm building up a canvas and I like the texture/finish etc. of liquin. I have been using a beeswax/liquin medium in my paint, approx 30% medium. On the next layer, I want to get thicker with the paint, and create a less matt surface. I do not want to add oil (don't want it to yellow). Do you think
it is safe to take my standard mixture (as above) and add maybe 25% more liquin, for the top layer? I'm unsure whether this is fatter or not, due to the alkyd...Thanks all for your help...

MetinYilmaz
04-05-2012, 01:19 PM
Although liquin promises glossy finish on its bottle tag, many painters say that it makes paintings matter (and darker in the long run) compared to other mediums. So if you add more liquin, you may get a matter layer contrary to what you expect. I suggest you to try the effect on a seperate surface with test layers and maybe share the result.

dirtysteev
04-05-2012, 01:38 PM
Usually yes, adding higher percentage of the liquin would be fine and follows the fat over lean rule. However, you didn't mention how much wax medium you used in your previous layers, and sometimes painting over wax medium with a non-wax medium can be problematic. I would say your wax-liquin ratio is more crucial than your percentage of liquin as you build layers.
Eliminating the wax from your medium will make it less matte.

dirtysteev
04-05-2012, 01:40 PM
I just re-read your question and I think I may have misread it the first time. If you are simply adding a higher percentage of liquin to your wax/liquin mix for subsequent layers you will be fine.

llawrence
04-05-2012, 07:11 PM
Who knows? :confused:

WFMartin
04-05-2012, 07:26 PM
Who knows? :confused:

Very, very true. Until someone can list the exact contents of Liquin, and in what proportions they occur within that medium (specifically the oil content), how would anyone be able to determine the fatness or leanness of Liquin, in relation to other materials? How can anyone possibly know for sure? I surely don't, at least not enough to make serious recommendations, regarding its use.

Of course its manufacturer will recommend that more Liquin relates to fatter layers. But, also realize that they are trying to sell this stuff.

Alan P. in OC
04-05-2012, 08:14 PM
Of course its manufacturer will recommend that more Liquin relates to fatter layers. But, also realize that they are trying to sell this stuff.

And this also from a manufacturer with an infamous video showcasing a man mixing approximately 12 gallons of liquin into a half-inch squirt of oil paint :lol:

DAK723
04-05-2012, 08:50 PM
In email correspondence with W&N, the response I received was that one could use roughly the same amount of Liquin in each layer. One need not be particularly exact, nor make each layer fatter.

I also realize that they have different answers in various locations on their website.

If I recall correctly, their reasoning was that while more Liquin equals more oil - and thus more Liquin would be fatter and slower drying - the quick-drying aspects of Liquin might equate to more Liquin equals faster drying. Because they have these two opposite characteristics, it is best to keep the amount of Liquin roughly the same. What they really cautioned against was widely different amounts in different layers. Anything roughly the same was OK.

Also, keep in mind that this thread is 12 years old and the original questioner hasn't been around for years.

Don

Ron Francis
04-05-2012, 09:14 PM
And this also from a manufacturer with an infamous video showcasing a man mixing approximately 12 gallons of liquin into a half-inch squirt of oil paint :lol:
Yes, that was amazing to see endorsed by such a high profile company.
That video is burned into my memory. :D

mariposa-art
04-05-2012, 09:25 PM
And this also from a manufacturer with an infamous video showcasing a man mixing approximately 12 gallons of liquin into a half-inch squirt of oil paint :lol:
LOL, I laughed out loud (literally) at your description of "12 gallons" to "half-inch squirt"! It's pretty much close to being true! :lol:

sidbledsoe
04-05-2012, 09:27 PM
another example of why fat over lean is the lousiest rule of thumb ever invented and liquin by no means has any exclusive right to the confusion, driers, various types of drying oils, time between layers, and solvents all continue to confound artists every day. the main thing one needs to consider is that you want to build a foundation that is stable. in layered paintings the layer underneath is the foundation, the layer on top is not. if the layer underneath moves while the layer on top does not move, it will cause the layer on top to crack.
a better way to think of it is flexible over less flexible. now this will depend on numerous factors.
your description of your painting layers is not the same as the question asked in the thread title. in the description both layers are using liquin.
i also would not worry about yellowing, linseed oil is what oil painting is all about, never had any yellowing at all in my decades of it's usage.
and adding 25% more of any medium to a mix that is already 30% seems like too much medium and it will make it even thinner, not thicker.
i don't know what to tell you, i just paint and add a little medium to get the flow i need, if i want it thicker i surely don't add medium, i just use straight paint.
nevermind shawn, you posted this 12 years ago, oh well, just mention liquin and you will get noticed, well it only took 12 years for the first response, must be a record or something!:lol: .

llawrence
04-05-2012, 10:25 PM
another example of why fat over lean is the lousiest rule of thumb ever invented I've got an ally - sweet!

DAK723
04-05-2012, 10:41 PM
another example of why fat over lean is the lousiest rule of thumb ever invented and liquin by no means has any exclusive right to the confusion, driers, various types of drying oils, time between layers, and solvents all continue to confound artists every day.

I know painters like to experiment and try lots of different things, but I think the above statement best exemplifies why keeping your medium simple - and using the same medium throughout the painting - is still the best rule of thumb.

Don

MetinYilmaz
04-06-2012, 10:19 AM
It took me 12 years to figure out the answer. Just kidding of course :)

I'm responsible for waking up the dead thread sorry. Didn't check the date.

sidbledsoe
04-06-2012, 10:29 AM
not a prob, all questions should get an answer no matter how long it takes :lol: we can use all the liquin threads we can get!:D