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View Full Version : What and what equals a bright turquoise?


lillie
01-12-2003, 03:35 PM
My husband likes bright colors and wants a painting using brigth turquoise, bright yellow, screaming red, brilliant orange...
:confused: I don't know where to find or how to mix the 'bright' turquoise..:mad:

I've tried different greens/blues and keep getting grey tones; tried adding white, but that pales the colors down.:(

I use oil paints and have a lot of colors to choose from, but which ones to choose; that's the question!;)

Any help is deeply appreciated. TIA :D

madster
01-12-2003, 04:51 PM
Originally posted by lillie
I've tried different greens/blues and keep getting grey tones; tried adding white, but that pales the colors down.:(

I use oil paints and have a lot of colors to choose from, but which ones to choose; that's the question!;)

What blues and greens are you using? That in itself may play a great part.

Turquoise hues are best done with Cerulean blues, not Ultramarines. I get the best results with Veridian greens also...

Patrick1
01-12-2003, 07:12 PM
Yes...tell us which blues, greens and yellows you have, then you'll get an answer as to which combo will give you the best turquoise.

TPS
01-12-2003, 08:05 PM
This will be difficult to achieve since turquoise is a tinted grayed blue green color. Choosing transparent and bright ingredient colors will get you the brightest mixture. Try these phthalocyanine blue, manganese blue, virdian green, phthalocyanine green, hansa yellow, strontium yellow, zinc white, ivory black. Play around with different combinations of these to see what results. You need to get the right balance of hues to get the turquoise look.

I believe there are some proprietary colors of turquoise, so you may want to look around for it. While Cerulean blue is a close starting color, it is very dense and opaque so may not get the brilliance you're looking for. Then again Cerulean all by itself surrounded by bright red-orange could indeed look like turquoise.

gnu
01-13-2003, 02:39 AM
as said, Ceruleun blue all by itself is a turquoise...
if you mix a red which tends to crimson, not blood red, with a lemon yellow, not a deep yellow, you will get a nice orange.
Crimson red is a nice bright red, and SOME of the medium cadmium yellows are rich and bright too, depends on the brands..
Reeves cad yellow is the nicest, but I can only get it in sets :(
Atelier is dull and not half as nice...
orange is so tricky to mix with limited colours, I'm going to go buy a cool-toned one to make nice peaches/apricots with...
all the best, and fiddle with the Virtual pallette...if you get a colour that's close to ones you have, ignore the name, it will still be close...

lillie
01-13-2003, 02:46 AM
The colors available that I've been mixing are;

Phthalo green
Prussian green
Permanent green
Phthalo blue
Prussian blue
Cobalt blue
Brilliant yellow
Zinc yellow hue
Cerulean blue

I've combined these colors in different ways adding a touch of Mars black or Titanium white; thinning some of the colors with linseed oil before mixing and then trying it without thinnng; but still haven't found 'the' color.:mad:

TPS, I don't have any of the colors you mention.
:( , maybe I'll get some and try those, but would like to find something with what I already have. Help, please....
:) :) TIA

Einion
01-13-2003, 03:14 AM
Originally posted by TPS
This will be difficult to achieve since turquoise is a tinted grayed blue green color
I'm sure Lillie isn't aiming for the colour of the mineral turquoise :D Either one is not hard to mix anyway.

Lillie, Phthalo Blue GS and one of the phthalo greens (the blue shade gives a marginally brighter result) are the commonest colours used in commercial turquoise mixtures, sometimes mixed with white. If you have these then you're all set. The basic mix is very dark so you either need to glaze it over white or mix in a little to be able to see the colour and for maximum saturation. The same blue, mixed with a smidgen of a green-biased yellow, will also give a decent turquoise but not so bright.

If you're using oils or watercolour and have Viridian, this will work in place of a phthalo green but again, the result won't be so bright. There is really no replacement for the phthalo blue if you want the brightest result, but if you have Cerulean Blue and one of the phthalo greens you'll get a decent result of slightly greater opacity.

Einion

Einion
01-13-2003, 03:23 AM
We cross-posted Lillie. You have the two phthalo colours so you should have no problems, did you try a mix of these and if so what did you not like about it? Looks gorgeous to me :)

Einion

BrianWarner
01-13-2003, 10:13 PM
Hi, I have a very good book called "Color Mixing Bible" by Ian Sidaway which gives all sorts of color mixes in all sorts of genre. I suggest this would be a good addition to your library and will help you on any occasion. Good luck with your efforts.

lillie
01-14-2003, 03:05 AM
Thanks all, for your help...

The Phthalo colors come about as close to what he likes as anything . I'll just have to adjust the green/blue ratio a little.
Those two colors are so dark it's hard to tell what the results of the mix is..have been using clean styrofoam meat trays to test the colors on..
;)

Also, will check out that book, Color Mixing Bible, sounds like a good idea to me!:D