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sundiver
12-13-2010, 05:40 AM
47 minutes of video of Sunday's painting demo here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/live-landscape-painting-demo

This is Week 2 of the threads for Johannes Webinar landscape painting and composition lessons!
Please post any notes and screenshots here.

marionh
12-13-2010, 06:29 AM
As this is a new thread, I'll repeat my question which is the last entry of the old thread.

I am trying to find Johannes' website but I don't have his last name so it is prooving difficult. Can anyone supply me with a link to his site?

Thanks in advance.

marionh
12-13-2010, 06:34 AM
Johannes - a question about your oil painting. How long would it take for that painting to dry? and would you varnish it?

OK that's two questions:lol: :lol:

jbercx
12-13-2010, 06:40 AM
As this is a new thread, I'll repeat my question which is the last entry of the old thread.

I am trying to find Johannes' website but I don't have his last name so it is prooving difficult. Can anyone supply me with a link to his site?

Thanks in advance.

Here it is: http://fineartstudioonline.com/johannesvloothuis (http://fineartstudioonline.com/johannesvloothuis)

and

http://www.cyberartlearning.com/

marionh
12-13-2010, 06:45 AM
Thank you jbercx

sundiver
12-13-2010, 07:56 AM
I enjoyed what Johannes did today . Just frustrated with the video thread being cut off and with the commercials cutting in. I set mine to record so i could go to town. Got back and the commercials had bumped me off and all i got was commercials three in a hour. Then the black outs frustrating so everything was chopped up. Shame it couldnt be like webnar. But Johannes paintings was beautifull and soo very interesting what i got to see of them. I so appreciate what he is doing i have learned so much in such a short time. As a beginner i did not know there was so much to doing landscapes. I for sure will be looking at things much different now. I already had been seeing things in a new perspective. I use to ride by and just see a tree. Now i notice everything about the tree. Which his teaching i will even see more. Thank you

I have Ad-Blocker and didn't see any ads. The screen would go black. When I hit "refresh" it would come right back to the demo.

PrimaryColours
12-13-2010, 08:15 AM
I think some of you have missed the last part of the demo. I was fortunate enough to be able to capture some shots just before Johannes ended his demo.
In this one you have Johannes adding details and a close-up to the sky region with all theses lovely melodic lines and negative spaces carving in the trees.
Wonderful demo and a big thank to you Johannes!
We are learning so much! Thanks!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/82429-JohannesDemo-dec-12-web.jpg

Johannes Instructor
12-13-2010, 09:26 AM
As this is a new thread, I'll repeat my question which is the last entry of the old thread.

I am trying to find Johannes' website but I don't have his last name so it is prooving difficult. Can anyone supply me with a link to his site?

Thanks in advance.

http://cyberartlearning.com/onlinegallery

Johannes Instructor
12-13-2010, 09:34 AM
Johannes - a question about your oil painting. How long would it take for that painting to dry? and would you varnish it?

OK that's two questions:lol: :lol:
Well the professional companies say 6 months for normal oil paintings before varnishing. 1 year if it has impasto. Personally I think that is too long. I think they are concerned about being sued if the painting is very valuable so they play it safe. You an use retouch varnish after a month. Some artists in order to get the paintings galleries varnish their paintings with Liquin as soon as it dries, let's say one week but windsor and newton advises against this. Jim Wilcox varnishes them quite early. Practically when they are dry.

Johannes Instructor
12-13-2010, 09:48 AM
Dan it only recorded about 7 minutes
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/11406729

Chrisp47
12-13-2010, 10:10 AM
Johannes really enjoyed your painting demo, it turned out awesome.
Would you mind posting your "Pointers for painting snow" here on WetCanvas?
Thanks for the wonderful instruction.

Grainne
12-13-2010, 10:27 AM
First, let me say that I am not a techie :D

But I have made a DVD of the first 1 hour 26 minutes of yesterday's painting demonstration. I just am not sure of what to do with it now.

I am currently trying to put it in a format that can be viewed on my website through iWeb. So we will see how that goes. It may not be possible. Any pointers out there?

I have viewed it and it looks good. I think the last half hour is available on USstream so that means all of it would be available.


Grainne

Johannes Instructor
12-13-2010, 10:45 AM
Here is the painting I did on Saturday. This photo is more accurate. It is high resolution so you and download it and zoom in.

Johannes Instructor
12-13-2010, 10:58 AM
Pointers for painting snow

1. Snow scenes are usually the most successful paintings because you can have one more value than other landscapes. Also the blank areas create rest areas, therefore enhancing the focal point. However because white is also silence, it can create boredom if the white or the blue snow patches are too predominant. You the artist must be creative to find ways to allow for enough snow yet make it entertaining to look at. Just like waterfalls the white areas should be reduced. Throwing immediate foregrounds into cast shadow will allow for many of the reflected colours to be seen into the “bluish” snow shadows. As I have taught you add a blue cast on top of your snow on some of the planes, especially those that are curved such as hills and drifted snow banks. Just allow whites to show where the sun hits the snow at a 90 degree angle.
2. As with waterfalls and clouds, never use white right out of the tube. Always add warm colours such as orange (cadmium orange), pink (Indian Red) or yellow (only yellow ochre. No cadmium, hansa or lemon yellows). The amount of any of these colours depends on your surrounding colours and the time of day. The later it gets in the evening, the more orangey the snow colour gets until it can even take on a red cast if there is a sunset. Pink highlights usually appear in morning skies, just like in skies. Snow will go from yellow orange to orange in late afternoons and this transition happens in less than 30 minutes. The sky dictates the colour of the snow. If you don’t have red bushes or pink in your skies then there is no point adding red to your snow highlights. Therefore you would handle oranges and yellows. Unless you are depicting a late evening don’t overdo the yellows and oranges in the white snow areas. Your snow can never be warmer than the fluffy areas of your horizon clouds but can be lighter. It is hard to give you a formula to how much warm pigment you should add to your white snow but your intuition will indicate this when you place the first strokes on the bare canvas. It’s got to feel right.
3. Also tinting your canvas ahead of time will allow some of that background colour to glow thru offsetting what would be too cool shadowed blue areas. I use a flesh value of burnt sienna.
4. The shadow part of your snow should never be a stark blue. Gray the blue by adding its complement. What works the best for me is to show variations of violets, grayed blues, oranges and viridian green. None of these should stand out to be easily detected by the viewer. For these subtle colours to be seen you should have to point them out and they would say, “Oh yeah now I see those different colours in there!”. If you have surrounding bushes and trees in the painting these colours should be present in the snow shadows and they will harmonize nicely. You really need to variegate the blue shadows if you want your painting to work. The shadow part of your snow will be grayer than the blue sky. A mid value is usually a good norm for cast shadows. Yet I have seen some good paintings where the foreground shadow is a mid dark to show distance by gradating the values. However I would avoid matching the same value as the sky to avoid a stacking effect.
5. Cast shadows are normally slightly off hard edged if they are produced by surrounding trees. These would be darker where the shadow originates, getting lighter as it recedes. Also the shadow is more defined where it originates and gets blurrier as it projects away from its source. If the shadow comes from a cloud overhead then it definitely would be considerably quite blurred. Plan these cast shadows to create a visual path towards the focal point. Placing a shadow in the immediate foreground, allowing the bright snow patches in the middle ground will make the painting look more inviting to walk into and help convey distance by adding another plane.
6. As an effect you can create the illusion that it is snowing by using a toothbrush and spraying the painting with the dots that come off it. Be careful not to overdo it. Don’t use the hightlighted whiteish snow for this. It will stand out too much. A midtone between highlight and shadow color would be more suitable. A mixture of both is the best which results into a light mid value. That is why Hollywwod creates the illusion of snow with newspaper to the aspect of sawdust. Also splattering in the immediate foreground will show texture offsetting the monotonous flat planes. This would read like wildlife foot prints.
7. Ice does not follow the same rules as snow. It tends to be much more gray, still blue on the colour wheel and you can see quite a bit of mud colour frozen in it if it appears in bodies of water.
8. The farther away the white snow is, the warmer it becomes. It is reversed from normal atmospheric perspective rules.
9. If you have patches of snow on mountains that are not connected, gray the other ones leaving the most predominate one that you choose to glow more than the others. Obviously the furthest one from the main snow patch will be more grayed than the others if there are three or more.
10. When snow is fresh it will be clean. When the snow is old is starts to pick up dust from the atmosphere that settles on it and you will see a burnt umber influence that dirties it. This is very evident on mountains because the snow patches act like sails trapping the dust. It can take months for mountain snow patches to melt and many times can even survive the whole summer.
11. On a personal recommendation I avoid greens in my snow scenes unless they are evergreen trees. It is hard for me to make green grass and snow work together or a green tree with snow on the ground. The season just doesn’t read right that way.
12. Try to connect your white areas of snow as much as you can so the eye does not hop scotch in the painting but flows nicely.
13. Once again as with everything redesign the photo's snow patches so they end up being abstract.

Johannes Instructor
12-13-2010, 11:07 AM
Well the professional companies say 6 months for normal oil paintings before varnishing. 1 year if it has impasto. Personally I think that is too long. I think they are concerned about being sued if the painting is very valuable so they play it safe. You an use retouch varnish after a month. Some artists in order to get the paintings galleries varnish their paintings with Liquin as soon as it dries, let's say one week but windsor and newton advises against this. Jim Wilcox varnishes them quite early. Practically when they are dry.

Here is more info about varnishing:

http://www.winsornewton.com/resource-centre/product-articles/varnishing-oils-and-acrylics

robertsloan2
12-13-2010, 12:37 PM
Wendy, thank you for making a new thread and making last week's thread sticky so that people can find it.

Dan, re old thread, thank you for posting your screen shots along with the reference photo. I agree with you, Johannes's painting is tons better than the photo.

Johannes, thank you for yesterday's great demo! I love the painting, thanks for linking to it so I can study it closer. That came out so beautiful - and I could see how much of it was done at the burnt sienna sketch stage.

I'm going to rework my little gouache painting and then start in on a pastel for the Pastel Spotlight. I'm going to repost the photo reference and the crop I did. The crop has some changes on it too. I did this to prepare for the sketch stage.

Johannes, seeing you alter the scans and photo references in the webinar so many times suggested to me that attacking my reference in Gimp before starting was a good idea as a pre-sketch. Like you said, I do know how to draw already but I'm in the habit of drawing what I see. So maybe mangling the reference before the sketch is a way to get around it?

This is what I did yesterday after class, with your principles fresh in mind:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-December-Spotlight-1-Wildflowers-Chia.jpg
Original reference from RIL posted by Chia, used in Dec. Pastel Spotlight as the challenge.

Several pastelists have done it and cropped out the too-dark tree. I wanted to include the tree, that was my challenge to myself - find a way to include the tree because I thought it was a bit too geometric without the tree. So I cropped it to horizontal, lost most of the flowers mass to bring it into what I think is a good proportion, lightened the tree to what I think it'd really look like and roughed up the mountains to give them a melodic line.

Critiques in the Pastel Spotlight thread - one suggested I made the mountains too jagged compared to the original reference. In the painting I plan on doing the mountains with a softened edge since they're right on the horizon. Please compare and tell me if I over-exaggerated what was already a melodic line or if I have the right idea (provided those big blocks are softened).

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-December-Spotlight-1-Wildflowers-Large-Chia-Crop.jpg

I also considered putting a bobcat into the foreground, knowing that the cat would become the center of interest. The same critiquer suggested that if I put in the cat I should flip him and put him in the lower right so that he balances the tree. Another critiquer voted for "leave out the cat."

I can get the cat's markings and details from references in the RIL, the cat's just a quick sketch for pose. Now that I think about it, if I put the cat on the right he's looking up into the branches of the tree and I could put a bird in there - just a flicker of color following the cat's line of sight, a cardinal or blue jay so the hunting cat isn't just stalking imaginary prey.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-December-Spotlight-1-Wildflowers-Large-Chia-Crop-Idea-2.jpg

Last, I didn't fiddle with the flower placement in Gimp because I know I'll put the flowers in last and do it intuitively. I do plan on massing them though, also moving most of the yellow ones up out of the no-fly zone to mingle them at the edges of the red-flowers clumps and have white and violet ones trail off into the no-fly zone.

All suggestions appreciated! Next stage is a pastel sketch and then I'll be doing it on good sanded paper as a painting.

sundiver
12-13-2010, 12:41 PM
Two things:
1. Sometimes the attachment feature works when the uploader won't
2. I heard thru the grapevine that YouTube has removed the time limit on videos. I haven't verified it but that's good news if accurate.

susanc
12-13-2010, 12:56 PM
Robert--I'm impressed with you for thinking of the mountains in terms of the melodic line. Great mindset to start out with! I'm wondering if maybe the melodic line of the mountain is a little busy? I have a note from the 1st webinar that says softer lines are easier on the brain. Represent without all the detail. A very soft melodic line is easier to read and follow. I admit, this was about evergreens so I could be way off base, but maybe you can have a simpler melodic line on the mountain because a lot of activity there might take some emphasis away from the flowers? For that reason, I sadly vote for no bobcat. (Sorry. I do like animals but it seems to compete with the wildflowers for attention--like 2 center(s) of interest?) I can't wait to see Johannes's recommendations...
Susan

robertsloan2
12-13-2010, 01:23 PM
Susan, yeah. You're echoing what Dan said about the mountain line. I might have overdone it to make the painting too busy - might do better sticking with the original reference for the mountain line so that it pushes back. I look at it and it's not that unmelodic - not straight, the swells are different sizes, the dips don't make triangles.

Thanks for your vote on the cat too. I can always do a different landscape with a cat in it. If you think this'll work with the flowers and foreground as the main focus then I can proceed on that basis with the no-cat version. The cat's just a scribbled idea.

Here's the remake of my Arches Cliffs gouache painting for the Western-Southwestern challenge, after Johannes's suggestions:

Before:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Dec-Western-SW-Challenge-Arches.jpg

After:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Arches-Cliffs-Remake.jpg

I think the violet really makes it pop. Also adjusted the line of the rocks. The texture of the added gouache cutting into the mountain line is a little less obvious in person than in the scan and the colors are a bit cleaner. The lightest level of the peach (rock color used thin in the sky area) is gone, but I tried to retrieve some of it. I used a little violet in the light clouds with it too and brought some of the violet into the dark storm clouds.

Sorry the scan is this lousy, the painting actually looks better.

Dharma_bum
12-13-2010, 03:00 PM
Johannes---Thanks for posting the video that was recorded in the second demo. Could you also post a high resolution picture of the finished painting? I spent some time working on the techniques, but still not ready for prime time yet. I did an underpainting in burnt sienna which I think will work, once I get the rest of it sorted out.

susanc
12-13-2010, 03:11 PM
Robert, I definitely think you have a very melodic line going in the mountains. You've done a great job of spacing out the line, too--varied lengths for each angle, not repeating the same length over and over. I'm sorry if that came across wrong. I was wondering, though, if you could try a quick sample with a simplified version of that melodic line--maybe not so quite many angle changes so that the eye can rest a bit in the background?
All the color in the flowers draws my eye to them so that's why I thought they were enough for a center of interest.

I feel extremely conflicted about trying to offer any suggestions to you because your notes and drawings are far superior to mine. I appreciate all you've done for us with your note taking and wanted to attempt to repay you with some thoughts here. However, maybe I'm not quite educated enough for that step yet! That's why I'm really looking forward to seeing recommendations from Johannes.

I love the purples you got in the cliff shadows. Wow!
Susan

susanc
12-13-2010, 03:22 PM
Years ago, I submitted a (coloring) book manuscript to a publishing company. (If only I didn't have to insert the word "coloring"!) It made it all the way to the final committee, but was finally rejected there. They said they liked the concept and the illustrations, but they felt that due to the holiday theme, it didn't have enough financial potential to be published. I learned that for most companies, the bottom line is their view of the potential bottom line!

If we'd like North to sponsor Johannes, it might help to mention the profit potential that is in it for them.

Odds are, they already feel they have the best online artist community presence on the web with wet canvas. But they now have a cutting-edge opportunity to enhance their reputation as art educators (beating out American Artist magazine, their competitor), create increased good-will for their books and magazines, while also bringing in more revenue from those products.

We've all seen that Johannes knows his stuff composition-wise. He's also knowledgeable in oil, WC, & acrylic, which enhances his versatility and makes him the ideal resource. We know there are people internationally out there who will eat his information up, since that's what we've been doing for the last week or so.

Additionally, there might be an opportunity for a co-sponsorship by Winsor Newton since Johannes can whole-heartedly recommend their paint. (I can't remember the term for this co-sponsorship concept. Is it called "Co-op" money?) Are there other companies who might also co-sponsor Johannes to help North Light offset the webinar expenses? (Upfront, I see these expenses involved: compensation for Johannes, bandwidth & IP service costs, the monthly GotoMeeting fee, complementary copies for Johannes of new North Light books, magazines, and DVDs so he is in a position to recommend them as he teaches, maybe advertising blinkies on WC or an ad in the Artist's mag. Currently, he has growing "word of mouth" going for him during December, a month of great distraction.) IMHO, that's pretty low expense-wise for a start-up proposition!

I have not been real big on art magazines for the last few years because they usually don't go into enough depth to completely satisfy. But what if Johannes had a monthly column in the Artist's Magazine that was possibly supplemented by:
1. A wet canvas thread giving readers the opportunity to ask Johannes questions relating to that article.
2. Homework related to that article.
3. Live critiques of some of the homework.
4. Live painting demos. (Yes, Johannes paints fast. I completely missed out yesterday--it was over before I got before my ancient computer finally booted up!) :)

He is also working on a book, which would be another great cross-platform tie-in.

Does anyone else have promotional ideas to show North Light that they are sitting on a goldmine? The more suggestions for profit or publicity we can think of, the better! I'd love to see this webinar concept become permanent.

Susan

Dharma_bum
12-13-2010, 03:28 PM
Robert---Re: your proposed horizon line in the flower picture, I agree that it seems a little busy. Maybe something halfway in between what you have done and what nature has provided. As it is, it competes too much for attention with the foreground flowers. I find it surprisingly difficult to find the right combination of shapes to make a melodic line both interesting and appear natural. I do see some subtle cloning happening - in the upper line, to the right of the tree there are a couple of meatballs followed by a couple more meatballs in the the next hill. (gotta thank Johannes for the new vocabulary, I will forever be thinking of meatballs, no fly zone, and melodic line whenever I look at a painting :D ). Of the next two hills are both flat topped, one reminds of a semi truck, the next is modified somewhat, but brings to mind a car.

As to the cat, I'd save it for another picture, there is enough going on with the flowers, and it would seem a distraction to me.

Dan

jbercx
12-13-2010, 03:31 PM
Years ago, I submitted a (coloring) book manuscript to a publishing company. (If only I didn't have to insert the word "coloring"!) It made it all the way to the final committee, but was finally rejected there.


Susan

Hi Susan, maybe, this manuscript is something to share with us , so that can learn from this?

edtree
12-13-2010, 03:43 PM
Susan...I think you're on to something. You know the old saying about persuasion: show/tell them what's in it for THEM! So, following your line of thinking...I'm not sure if he's done it or not, but perhaps if Johannes submitted a detailed prospectus along with the request, the target companies would see the potential for monetary gain. Along with the plan, the application materials could/should contain stats from these current events, outlining the success. Wouldn't help to throw in some graphs to show how this has snow-balled. Considering how important this is, if it were me, I would consult a marketing person and perhaps someone who is an expert in business plans and the like.

Just my two cents...for what they're worth.

Elizabeth

edtree
12-13-2010, 03:50 PM
Robert, I like your next project! I agree with the rest on the simpler mountain line and the omission of the cat. I'm thinking too that the flowers should be set up in a way to form a visual path instead of random as they are now. Also, I think the scene would be much more restful with just the lavender flowers and maybe a yellow or two for accent (omitting the reds) but that may just be me. I too look forward to see what Johannes says.

Great job on the revision of the arches cliffs. The cliffs are so much nicer. That purple DOES it and I see you've echoed it in the clouds! Nice!

Elizabeth

Grainne
12-13-2010, 04:14 PM
but perhaps if Johannes submitted a detailed prospectus along with the request, the target companies would see the potential for monetary gain.

While not a written plan, the greatest "prospectus" it would seem would be the wild international enthusiasm and commitment there has been for Johannes' webinar and his threads here in WetCanvas.

It's really rather amazing that there has been such committed attendance at his webinar presentations each day and the video demonstration on Sunday. The viewers keep coming back for more and they "hang" with him for hours, hungry for the "nuggets" that no instruction has either given them before or has not been presented in such a way that it is easily understandable and that creates growth in the receiving artists.

All this in the month of December full of holidays which make such demands otherwise on people's time and attention.

And the word has only gone out from the Landscape forum here at WC in just over a week . . . imagine the much, much broader audience as more and more artists learn of this golden opportunity.

Hopefully, F&W/Artist Magazine will see the opportunity this provides both for them and for the artist community they should serve. After all, this enterprise at WetCanvas should be a two-way street.



Grainne (aka Kaye in the Webinar because we were advised to give a fake name that first day :D )

Johannes Instructor
12-13-2010, 04:51 PM
Johannes---Thanks for posting the video that was recorded in the second demo. Could you also post a high resolution picture of the finished painting? I spent some time working on the techniques, but still not ready for prime time yet. I did an underpainting in burnt sienna which I think will work, once I get the rest of it sorted out.

The photo is in the page 1 of this thread.

robertsloan2
12-13-2010, 10:04 PM
Johannes, thank you for another fantastic webinar! Nine pages of notes tonight. Here's the first batch:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Notes-Dec-13-1.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Notes-Dec-13-2.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Notes-Dec-13-3.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Notes-Dec-13-4.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Notes-Dec-13-5.jpg

robertsloan2
12-13-2010, 10:07 PM
Second batch:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Notes-Dec-13-6.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Notes-Dec-13-7.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Notes-Dec-13-8.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/13-Dec-2010/70184-Class-notes-Dec-13-9.jpg

One of my favorite gold nuggets from tonight is the way to show animals in a scene in motion, the blurring for motion really works. Thank you!

allydoodle
12-13-2010, 10:58 PM
Thank you again Johannes for a fun and informative evening.

I am listing the 10 things Johannes says to think about when painting a landscape:


THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN PAINTING A LANDSCAPE




Are you putting in abstract shapes?
Do you have melodic lines?
Are you grouping masses - shapes/values? (3 masses usually)
Are you echoing colors?
Are you remembering about the no fly zone?
Are you working front to back?
Are you altering corners?
Are you making sure not to repeat shapes?
What can I take out? Ask yourself why is that tree there? If there’s no good reason, take it out and simplify.
Remember to work values from 1 – 7. Value 8 is reserved for accents.I think I will post this right next to my easel, anything that will help me to remember all the "nuggets" Johannes has taught us. All I will have to do is remember to look at it :lol: . I'm visual, I can do it...........................

hewill4giveu
12-13-2010, 11:54 PM
Boy i wish i had not missed a whole week of Johannes teaching. I have been on for the last three days . What i have learned from him has been more than what i could have ever imagined. Things i just did not know at all . I love the webnar i do not know whos idea or why it got started but i could do this every day. Altho im getting nothing done LOL not even any art. I do a pet coarse but if we could get it done like this i think we could really move forward quicker. Nothing is easyby just listening and then doing it but when its explained like Johannes does so much sticks. I mean i dont look at how i take my pictures the same. He taught some things on animals that was sooooo good today would love more of that. Tips for choosing pictures to paint. My goodness i live in Wy and have taken hundreds of pics since coming three months ago. Well now i need to go back out because i know what i need to be looking for in order to paint. He is an ever ready bunny he just keeps going and going and going. I dont know how he does it i get tired watching but his excitment does not taper as the evening goes on which keeps you glued to the screen. I have health issues and im a beginner so this type of teaching is just what a person like me needs. I dont have to sit in a chair or stand for long hours to learn. I can copy this save it and re play at my time. I love he answers questions and then critics work too. What more could we ask for. Bravo Johannes i for one greatly appeciate what you have done. ( all my posts wont be this long guys sorry) OH one more thing someone please video it tommarrow i have to go to denver until 5 my mountain time and i will mess too much. I use Debut video captureing software which is free it copys everything on the screen and voice love it.

robertsloan2
12-14-2010, 12:09 AM
Chris, thank you for the checklist! I have the abbreviated 5 point version in my notes but my wrist and hand gave out after he switched to just general discussion.

I have some arthritis and if I keep going for too many hours, my hands will shut down, especially on cold nights. So thank you for taking down the full version so I don't have to draw/write another page!

Johannes, I would love it if you'd do one session entirely on Putting Animals In Landscape Paintings. Animals are a big part of why I'm doing landscapes - doing animal studies in my sketchbook and doing landscapes without them, eventually to bring the two together.

Tonight's fantastic nugget was the animals-in-motion tip. I illustrated it as well as I could in line drawings - and accidentally drew the best little running cheetah that I've ever done from memory because I needed to. I'd never succeeded in "running cheetah profile" till tonight, but I could do him now in any medium.

hewill4giveu
12-14-2010, 12:30 AM
OH i agree Robert would love more on animals but not tommarrow i will miss it please !!!!!!

Johannes you mentioned dust could you explain how you do dust and how you could blend say acrylics where it would soften the feet to show movement. Pastels would be easy to do that but not sure about acrylics im afraid i would blur them to much or not enough or it would look messy. Oils blend better as pastels.

jbercx
12-14-2010, 01:05 AM
Robert,
thank you again for the notes. Because I am living in Switzerland, it is too late for me to stay away and follow the classes. Thanks to you're notes, I am able to use and learn from these classes.

It would be great if someone could record these classes so that we can download and see these also if you are not able to follow these classes live.

Tattau
12-14-2010, 01:12 AM
Johannes, I'd love to hear of any kind of tips regarding window mullions for buildings. Glass-paned windows (especially distant to mid ground) have always been my arch-nemesis, and have pretty much screwed-up many otherwise decent paintings. I just cant find any structured approach, or rule-of-thumb basics to rendering them convincingly.

marionh
12-14-2010, 02:55 AM
Another interesting webinar. Robert it will be interesting to see where you go with your painting. It's such a lovely reference that speaks to me (flowers in it:lol: ) I might give it a go myself.

Unfortunately I had to leave after just an hour - way past my bedtime:lol:
but everyones' notes are a godsend.

My only problem is that there is a lot of concentration on the pines - which I know feature greatly in American landscapes, but I would love to see some landscapes where deciduous trees are used which would be very useful to me for the English landscapes.

I am looking forward to the waterfall tutorial, does anyone know when that is scheduled and what the topic is tonight.

robertsloan2
12-14-2010, 03:00 AM
Johannes mentioned in class that we'll be doing mountains tomorrow - another subject I'm really looking forward to. I'll probably do a lot of sketching when I take my notes. I love mountains and now that I think about it, haven't ever tried them in anything bigger than a sketch.

marionh
12-14-2010, 03:09 AM
Thanks Robert.

You must be up either very late or very early LOL

appydax
12-14-2010, 08:01 AM
Johannes, I am another who would love to know more about putting animals in a landscape setting. I have only done a very simple one of grass here. I would like to know how to add more of a landscape to eventually do wildlife paintings with the animal as part of it's natural setting. I have only been painting since last September with pastels. You are giving me so much information to work with in the future. Thank you once again.
I am in England and watch the first 2 hours and then have to go to bed so I record the rest to watch the next morning.....Intensive stuff and my husband has nicknamed you Robo-artist.......your stamina is amazing.

Sharronhttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2010/127177-afghanelements_800x600.jpg

jbercx
12-14-2010, 08:24 AM
I am in England and watch the first 2 hours and then have to go to bed so I record the rest to watch the next morning.....

Sharron
Can you explain to me how you record this? Because I have the same issue as you....:) Do you have perhaps the recordings of the previous nights? I am very interested in this, thanks!

Colorix
12-14-2010, 08:50 AM
Johannes is a gold-mine, with not only nuggets, but a rich vein! I'm so grateful!

Robert, adore your notes, informative, accurate, and beautiful.

On Tuesday (yesterday as I type), I sent one in for critique. It was painted/sketched/studied yesterday too. (That is, after soaking up a week of instruction.) I used a tricky ref, and tried to make the study more interesting, taking a risk of total failure. I got the advice to flip it, which clearly made it better. (Had I know the nugget about tic-tac-toe focal point *ranking*, I'd've done it differently, but we got that yesterday.)

I'd love advice from you guys on this. It is a study, very small, only 9x12" (A4), pastel. I *tried* to think of everything... I wonder if the 'sugarcubes' look to contrived, and what to do (suggestions were flowers, tractor tracks). I also wonder if the front to back balance works (might not, were some typed comments on that).

Hazy sunny day "Harvest Dice"
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2010/117343-Harvest_Dice_S.jpg

Me too -- what recording program works on pc?

appydax
12-14-2010, 09:12 AM
jbercx I am using on my Mac the IshowU software and I understand that for pc you can use www.nchsoftware.com/capture/index.html (http://www.nchsoftware.com/capture/index.html)
I missed the first couple as I was unaware it was on. Johannes did say that he would try and find a way so that we could get the recordings. I am useless with computers and for some reason I had video but no sound last night yet altered nothing :crying: Luckily I watched about 2 and a half hours of it :clap:
No idea how to do anything with them other than keep them on a removable drive to keep them safe. I have Robert's notes on there too....thanks again Robert :thumbsup:

Charlie, I love that painting. It evokes a feeling of warmth, tranquility and lazy days. Love the tic-tac-toe thing that Johannes explained too, I didn't realise there was anything like that......makes sense when you think about how your eye reads though. Charlie the one thing I kept feeling was I would have liked to shove that front hay back a bit, I felt a little crowded if that makes sense, and wanted to get *in* a bit first....maybe different with a mount around it though.

I haven't painted a thing since Johannes webinar......my poor little brain is whirring away as I don't have the experience that many of you have, I am starting from much farther back.

Sharron

jbercx
12-14-2010, 09:31 AM
Thank you Sharron, that is just what I needed!

@Colorix, that's a beautyfull painting!

Michaelmcg
12-14-2010, 09:50 AM
Hi Charlie,

I don't see any balance issues in this. But one thing which struck my eye when I first saw it was perhaps that there may be a little too much chroma in those mid-distant trees. I think if you dull them a little it will make the painting even better.

Isn't all this just the best thing to stumble across!

Michael

susanc
12-14-2010, 09:56 AM
Johannes fried my brain to a crisp last night, as usual. Thnks?!! :D My husband is stunned by all the energy in J's voice, even after talking for 4 hours. I also enjoyed visiting all the artist sites afterward. My eye is getting a re-education, along with my brain. My taste is changing some, I think for the better. (Sorry. I did feel a guilty pleasure looking at one of my favorite painters this morning--I think you might consider her work garish. I know that So Cal painters have a rep in NY for being "too colorful", and I'm still drawn toward colorful paintings despite that.) We both agree on Clyde Aspevig being the best, though!
Chris, that is a great list to use for self-critique after painting, too. I'm glad you posted it (especially in bold so it's easy to find!), and Robert--as usual your effort is beyond value. Thanks to everyone for making this such a great experience. :angel:

Grainne
12-14-2010, 10:07 AM
Really enjoyed yesterday's session as usual!

Just when you think there couldn't possibly be any more to learn, more of Johannes' golden nuggets come tumbling out :) His passion for painting and his enthusiasm for sharing and helping other artists maximize their work are inspiring traits that energize me.

I cannot believe that I have spent this many hours glued to my computer and yet am eager each afternoon to do it all over again :D I am not going to waste this opportunity for sure!


Grainne (aka Kaye in the webinar)

Colorix
12-14-2010, 11:46 AM
Sharron, thank you! The bale bothers me too, might work if further into the pic (and less contrast). I'll check the pc software!

(this is the third effort I've done this week, the previous ones are in the round archive...)

jbercx, thank you!

Michael, thanks! I tried to 'layer' the bg... Oh, Michael, as you know, it is so hard to get exact colours on screen (uploading to WC changes them too), and those trees do look too chromatic here, but are better IRL, they just stand out a wee bit more but belong to the 'clump' of trees. Agree, this is fantastic, nobody else teaches *all* the secrets! Johannes is absolutely great!

Susan, thank you, I'll try it! (Teenage sons can cook, so mommy can watch paint dry!)

And, yes, I'm a colour junkie... :-)

robertsloan2
12-14-2010, 11:55 AM
Sharron, your dog is rendered beautifully. Johannes hasn't mentioned specifically when he'll do waterfalls or if he'll do one on animals in landscapes. Tonight's class is on mountains, something else I love and hope to improve on. I finally got it that when he says "rocky mountains" he means any rugged mountains, not just The Rockies in the western USA.

Charlie, he's improving on gorgeousness with his critique. There's a snaking streak of gold that comes down from the clump of trees and trails off toward the hay bales. I think if you strengthened that line and continued it along the S-curve of the bales it would help to connect them in that visual path. Of course flipping it would take redoing it, but this one is so lovely as it is that I'd hang it on my wall. Given his suggestions I'd redo it flipped but definitely make this one available somehow, whether I can afford it or not someone's going to love it and be happy with it for life.

I like the sugarcubes, they're different. They're not overly harsh and they are also the title, the point of the painting. I think it'd be dull if all landscape artists painted the same things - always round hay bales, always evergreen trees, always a particular type of coastline or field. I'd give the bales a point for originality and I can see yours as an elegant example of taking a geometric subject and rendering it with harmonic lines.

You jazzed them up. Set them at various angles, pulled tufts of hay out here and there without making them look like they're falling apart, they look natural and appealing. Also your corners never, ever match. I sort of got the "don't match corners" thing in your class in a way because you talked so much about hue shifts and gradations within masses.

Last night it boggled me his mentioning the priorities of the four "rule of three" points. It made sense but I sketched it twice in my notes because it's such a useful thing. I had no idea some of those points were better than others.

I went up and voted for Best of WetCanvas this morning. I wound up looking at all the paintings by Johannes's criteria and it was an eye-opener. The one I liked most wasn't in the lead at all though. I wonder which of those five paintings Johannes would like best?

susanc
12-14-2010, 11:56 AM
(Teenage sons can cook, so mommy can watch paint dry!)


I knew you had a great sense of humor, but this is actually no joke--it's a very good idea! Thanks!

cubrit225
12-14-2010, 12:16 PM
Johannes, yesterday was my first webinar also watched you painting on Sunday. Thank you for your amazing teaching. All the information you are giving us that we cannot find in books or they are not clearly explained is a great thing but for me the best is the way you teach, you put so much passion in it and you are able to communicate it. You motivate a desire to be a better painter no matter what it takes.
As others have expressed I would also love to see how to add a landscape to birds or wild animals. So far I have painted water birds in water, now I am trying to add landscape in the background or foreground.
I am a realistic painter but I want to learn how to add a loose landscape when I paint them. After your teaching I am trying to modify a painting of a White Ibis with a pond and vegetation behind it. Now I notice the meatballs and lack of melody; I didn't now what was bothering me, now you made me "see" it.
I just did a drawing of my new version in Paint software. I have to find out how to attach the original photo and the drawing to a post. Thank you again.
Irma

appydax
12-14-2010, 12:26 PM
Thanks Robert, it was done a couple of months ago before I had any idea, although I think the grass I did instinctively, which I am pleased about after listening to Johannes and the seeing versus photograph :confused:

All the subjects of mountains, trees, buildings, grass, etc. all go along with what I would like to do eventually. I love landscapes and I love animals and to combine the two would give the best of both for me.
I am not in the least bit knowledgeable about any form of art so don't know what to ask as I don't know what I need/want to know :confused:
I don't understand how to combine references together to make a successful painting. It can't be as simple as just painting a landscape and plopping an animal in.....can it :crossfingers:

So if you have time Johannes ..:lol:

Sharron

fishpimp
12-14-2010, 01:04 PM
Got to first class last night and enjoyed it immensely. I am having a tough time finding the thread on evergreens...he showed the palette for them along with highlight colors, there were notes from someone who attended the class... Help?

Davkin
12-14-2010, 01:40 PM
Got to first class last night and enjoyed it immensely. I am having a tough time finding the thread on evergreens...he showed the palette for them along with highlight colors, there were notes from someone who attended the class... Help?



It got stuck into the hall of fame sticky at the to of the forum;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=11775321#post11775321

BTW Phil, I'm in "Yootah" as well. Maybe we could get together for some plein air painting next summer.

David

susanc
12-14-2010, 01:54 PM
We both agree on Clyde Aspevig being the best, though!

Gasp! What kind of witless person would write something so foot-in-mouth? :o
Oh yeah, that would be me. Is it OK if I still come to the webinar this afternoon?:crossfingers:

I have to admit, I've been hopelessly in love with Clyde since the early 90's. (Hopeless, because I'll never be able to afford his work!) I don't understand the reason why I like him so much, but I think Johannes has revealed a few subconscious reasons why.

I've never read a book or had a teacher that even remotely approached what Johannes has shared. He has crammed a lot of important info into an incredibly short time frame. I finally understood the term "refraction" because of something he said in a webinar last week. The books that tried to explain it never made sense to me until now.

(Maybe I'll just register under a different name from now on.) :)
Susan

Johannes Instructor
12-14-2010, 02:04 PM
Johannes--I should have added that I love the colors in the snowscape you posted earlier and in your painting demo. When you said the beauty of color is in the mid-dark values, it was a revelation to me. I thought I'd have to put in darks to make the color stand out. So maybe there's hope I can see garish as garish one day!

Oops maybe I misspoke. The beauty of colors shows up well in the MID VALUES.

Johannes Instructor
12-14-2010, 02:10 PM
I thought I would share this televsion report they did on my classes. Sorry about the ego trip but my wife says I don't promote myself enough. Click on link below:
This is from CTV which is Canada's most important national TV station.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFQGSoGUNmA

robertsloan2
12-14-2010, 02:20 PM
Johannes! Thank you for posting the TV clip. That's very cool. They did a good job of showing your energy, enthusiasm and incredible teaching skills in a very short time. I saw how good your students were in it. I looked at the background a lot of times to see good paintings on every easel - made me wish I lived in Edmonton and could just hang out at your house being mentored.

Climate works against me on that. I think it rocks what you're doing up there though and I'm glad they gave you this publicity.

Today I did the pastel sketch. I might return to this subject again, not 100% satisfied with this one and it's not on sanded paper. It came out tons better than I thought it would though, after your suggestions! I had to attach it because the uploader decided not to work.

susanc
12-14-2010, 02:21 PM
I thought I would share this televsion report they did on my classes. Sorry about the ego trip but my wife says I don't promote myself enough. Click on link below:
This is from CTV which is Canada's most important national TV station.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFQGSoGUNmA

Yes, glad you listened to your wife. IMHO, wives are always right! :thumbsup:

:cool: Great clip. I agree with Robert--it made me want to move up there, too. BTW, what else have you been hiding from us?

jbercx
12-14-2010, 02:25 PM
I thought I would share this televsion report they did on my classes. Sorry about the ego trip but my wife says I don't promote myself enough. Click on link below:
This is from CTV which is Canada's most important national TV station.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFQGSoGUNmA

Johannes, thank you for sharing this one. Good promotion of youself. I love it.\
Any planning to come overseas (Europe/Switzerland) for some classes?

Here is one of mine paintings, Mostly mountains The frame is maybe a bit over the top, but my son made this frame at school, so I keep it as it is.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/14-Dec-2010/83731-Zinal_Rothorn.JPG

Devonlass
12-14-2010, 02:32 PM
Great video Johannes. Looks like you're just a softie at heart!!

fishpimp
12-14-2010, 02:33 PM
It got stuck into the hall of fame sticky at the to of the forum;

http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?p=11775321#post11775321

BTW Phil, I'm in "Yootah" as well. Maybe we could get together for some plein air painting next summer.

David
Yessir, whenever you want...gotta throw some fly fishin in there, too! Where you at? I'm in Syracuse. Thanks, Phil.

wcjan
12-14-2010, 02:36 PM
Johannes,

Thanks for the YouTube clip - now I finally know how to pronounce your name!!

- Jan

Colorix
12-14-2010, 02:40 PM
Sharron, can't believe I didn't see your beautiful dog until now. FWIW, I think he works well as is, basically a vignette portrait, the grass giving a context of outdoors. Maybe bounce some of those greens into his fur? And some of his browns into grass? Delicately. Beautiful dog, we call them Afghan... they're big in looks, but not the Einsteins of doghood.

Dharma_bum
12-14-2010, 02:52 PM
Charlie---One suggestion to help bridge the distance to the trees would be to enhance the texture farther into the picture plane. The texture as it is now is going at a strong diagonal, which is actually leading out of the picture, though it stops before it gets there. If you altered that, and showed the darker sort of burgundy lines going into the picture instead of out it would lead toward the trees and the other smaller hay bales. Most mowed fields have a pattern of rows produced by the mower, you could use that usher the viewer back there. I think I have an image from the library which will illustrate, though it is a cornfield, and what you see is bass of the stalks that were left, you can see how powerful the linear perspective can be to direct the eye back. Well, the image won't upload, but just Google "mowed field" and you will get many examples. You can make the effect as strong or subtle as you want.

As for the bales themselves, they do look like cubes, whereas most no round bales I've seen have been more rectangular, which should be more interesting to look at than a cube as well as giving more surface to paint, if you see what I mean. Though I suppose these could be rectangular, but showing square due to perspective.

I love the color in this one, and the texture in the foreground is wonderful!. Robert may be right though, pastels are difficult to do reworks and get the same magic, so you might start over rather than trying to revise. The only other thing I would suggest for this one is that you might move the second clump of bales back a little farther, and add another, closer group on the right side, so that the eye would go there first, then to the ones that you moved, and then to the trees. That would be the easiest way to fix this one I think.

Dan

appydax
12-14-2010, 02:57 PM
Thanks Charlie, it was for my Pet Portrait course on the dreaded velour a couple of months ago. I am just pleased with the grass agreeing with Johannes method of seeing...out of focus and then into the painting ...as I didn't know about that or placement of thirds or anything. There is not a lot of instruction unfortunately. Be lovely to be able to do a stunning landscape with perhaps a wild animal in a natural setting using Johannes techniques.
Mountains, trees, river or lake, dramatic sky, foliage, etc. :lol:

Johannes, that clip brought a tear to my eye. You are not only generous with sharing your knowledge you seem to genuinely enjoy your students success.
I can relate to that.....you must get as much of a buzz as your students :thumbsup:

Sharron

ScottCooper
12-14-2010, 03:00 PM
I get the feeling (in fact I'm pretty sure) that many of you are typing comments directly to Johannes during the webinars, but I don't see anywhere in the viewer to add comments or ask questions. Anybody feel like pointing out the solution to an inept Canucklehead?
Scott

robertsloan2
12-14-2010, 03:13 PM
When the webinar is open there's a tiny little widget that floats next to it and on top of it. Click the little arrow on the top that points to the left - it's white on red or red on white, it's a red arrow. That opens up a chat box where you can ask questions of the instructor.

It will collapse if it's ignored for a while and you need to expand it again. I didn't see it the second time I went in, but figured it out eventually by closing everything else on my desktop to see what was left.

Minimized, it's maybe an inch long and a quarter of an inch wide.

Talley
12-14-2010, 03:17 PM
Scott, in the webinar application, make sure you've selected from the top menu, "view control panel". a small panel will open on the right hand side of the main screen. you can type questions in the box at the bottom. but you can't see others' questions . took me a while to realize that.

Johannes, I just wanted to add my thanks and appreciation to the chorus. last night was the first webinar I attended but I did see the wonderful demonstration on Sunday. i feel as if I've already gained a wealth of information in a form that I am much more likely to remember vs. just reading it in a book, if it were even available. seeing paintings improve in front of my eyes with a few changes is a really remarkable experience. thank you, thank you, thank you.

crazywoman53
12-14-2010, 03:24 PM
In the upper right hand corner of your screen you will see a little orange/red arrow pointing to the left. some people are saying it is red but on my screen it looks orange. Click on that and it will open another smaller screen where you can see the place to type in your question.To close that screen click on the arrow that should now be pointing right. It took me awhile to figure it out too so don't feel bad.

crazywoman53
12-14-2010, 03:32 PM
Opps forgot what I wanted to post... Johannes could you post the list of what to do to select a photo to paint from you showed last night please. I got the first three written down before my screen froze and when I got it back it was gone. Thank you.. enjoyed the class last night and am looking forward to tonights!

sundiver
12-14-2010, 05:57 PM
Was the webinar over early tonight? I got an error message with the emailed link, and a "This Webinar is over" message with the old link in the first thread, and that was at 5:35 EST.

Colorix
12-14-2010, 05:59 PM
Wendy, it is ongoing. Find it through his cyberartlearning.com, the school-buss Icon in the left column.

oldradagast
12-14-2010, 08:53 PM
While all of Johannes' lessons have been very helpful, today's lesson on mountains was particularly useful for us "flat-landers" who generally don't see mountains in person. Here's my notes on the subject:

Mountain Pointers

· Bring the peak of the mountain up to the edge of the canvas, but don’t skim it, and don’t get it too close (framing problems.)
· Primary mountain peak should not be at the center and avoid “saw tooth” effect.
· Mountain does not always have to be the huge, dominant part of the painting.
· Avoid “pasted on” mountains – make sure they have a shadowed area to look 3-D.
· Never let a tree, foreground hill, or anything else stand taller than the mountain, unless the painting is about the trees, not the mountain. To make the mountain majestic, keep everything else at about 1/3 the mountain height, max.
· Never let a tree (evergreens are the worst for this) to line up with the mountain peak. Stick the tallest trees away from the primary peaks.
· Avoid triangles near the edges as the peaks slope down, especially near the edges of the painting. Tweak the shape or put the background mountains in the distance.
· Clouds covering peaks – particularly similar peaks – is a good way to fix repetitive peaks.
· Don’t forget to add cracks, grooves, and details in the value planes on your mountains unless they are very far away. It adds a 3-D effect.
· Don’t let the mountains exit both sides of the painting at the same height.
· Large, rocky mountains should appear relatively hard-edged in most cases.
· Use the brush angle when creating mountains – you’d rather have a blocky look vs. a curvy look for rocky mountains.
· Connect your bright snow patches (either directly, or with smaller snow patches) or you’ll get a spotty look. Darker snow patches in shadow don’t need this treatment.
· Don’t overuse white in your snow – add a bit of color to it.
· White snow + white clouds = confusion. One or the other should be the focus.
· Putting shadowed snow next to white snow adds a 3-D effect – no “pasted on” snow.
· Design snow patches with abstract shapes – don’t just slather it on and hope for the best.
· Use clouds as a way to darken the snow in areas that are not the focal point.
· Mountain peaks placed against white clouds add to the drama.
· Adding more red to the mountain color is usually a good idea. Don’t let the mountains end up as pure blue + white since that is boring. The added color is particularly true near sunset, but even early in the day, pure blue mountains are boring subjects.
· Don’t over simplify your mountains – show the little details to make it look like a mountain, not a small rock.
· Raw Umber in the white snow is appropriate for older snow, which makes sense if there isn’t much snow left on the mountain.
· Using a snow patch to create the division between a foreground mountain and a background mountain is a clean way to separate close value planes.
· Orange-pink highlights against blue-violet shadows works well. They share a common color – red. Remember to share your hues in your painting.
· Mountain tips should be a bit lighter in value – they are a long distance away.
· Trees on the mountains should be connected, abstract shapes of green, not detailed zigzags, and should be of similar value to the mountain.

kathylbell
12-14-2010, 09:10 PM
Great note taking Matthew, thanks!

allydoodle
12-14-2010, 09:12 PM
Thank you Matthew!:thumbsup: From a fellow flatlander! :eek:

robertsloan2
12-14-2010, 09:19 PM
Matthew, thank you for your notes! I took 13 pages of mine tonight and this is going to get trippy posting them!

The uploader isn't working so they're all attachments.

robertsloan2
12-14-2010, 09:20 PM
Second batch:

robertsloan2
12-14-2010, 09:21 PM
Last three pages:

oldradagast
12-14-2010, 09:34 PM
Wow, Robert - great notes, as always - I'm amazed at how much you got in there!

hewill4giveu
12-14-2010, 09:54 PM
Your very welcome to those who have the debut video capture software. i love it if i get on line on time i can video the whole thing even when there are phone distractions .

To the person whos computer crashes maybe your puter is older im not computer savy. I have about a5 year old computer and its vista so wouldnt know about any other. I tried to use ask and record for videos but the commercials kicked it off each time they came on so just gonna use my debut. Just cant be playing around with other things or it will cut Johannes and record what your doing on screen.

Boy i wish with Rodger and Sharron Johannes would do some more on animals. He has so much info im totally soaking in each morsell.
Will have to leave next monday and tues watch him do it then i would be so upset. Cause altho notes are so great and so appreciated. I love his picture exampes to he uses. Like the icing on the cake. But Rodger i want you to know i appreciate your notes i missed a lot at first and thanks to you i have notes at least.

hewill4giveu
12-14-2010, 10:09 PM
Johannes nice to see the tv clip and to be able to put a face with the voice. You have a love for what you do and it shows in your teaching. I am so thankfull a friend told me about your teachings. Everyday i am glued to each and every thing you are teaching. My love for art is growing everyday. I just started probably a year and half ago. With what you are showing me i cannot wait until i put it to work. Shame there is no way to get critics after this is all over. Hopefully i will be able to afford one of your classes where i can send in work. Right now i am so into the teaching i dont have time to paint anything. Thank You, Thank You ,Thank You I dont know how this got started but you are one of a kind. Teresa Howell

winecountry
12-14-2010, 10:33 PM
thanks Johannes another pack jammed session...I love it

and Robert how funny, I did the same sketch you did for the 3 kinds of soft edges using a purple pastel too!

allydoodle
12-14-2010, 11:10 PM
Johannes,

I have watched the news clip, and I have to say, my goodness. You are special, and it is apparent that you get great joy in sharing your knowledge with anyone eager to learn. Your generosity this past week has been so heartwarming and appreciated in a way you will never know. I work in pastels almost exclusively, to the point of obsession. For the first time in my life I am considering an alternative medium. When the time comes for me to acquire yet another medium, I think it will be oils. I know this is because of your approach; you have sparked yet another interest for me to pursue. Thank you for sharing so much of yourself with all of us.

allydoodle
12-14-2010, 11:32 PM
I'm wondering if anyone has a list of pointers for trees - not evergreens, but deciduous trees. I live on Long Island in NY, and we are pretty flat here, with no mountains, and not too many evergreens, but lots of deciduous trees. I think the Webinar for deciduous trees was one of the first ones, and I missed part or most of it.

Thanks to anyone who might have it!

rugman
12-14-2010, 11:54 PM
For Chris an anybody else who missed.

Deciduous trees:

1. branches grow like hands on a clock
2. right and left sides need to be different
3. tree needs to be asymetrical abstract shape
4. think sky gaps, not holes, usually in middle part of tree
5. whatever part gets 90 degree direct sun gets highlight
6. cool very top of tree, which will make it rounder (top will reflect a bit of sky color.
7. paint back and forth from positive to negetive shape, carving out stage
8. dont have to paint sky first
9. whatever darks you put into lower area, dont carry up to top of tree
10. carve out accents near bottom of tree
11. use drybrush technique for closer details
12. dont do pruned look, think clusters of leaves
13. use hit/miss (soft and hard) edges going around tree foliage
14. make sure negetive spaces are different
15. dont take tree brach to top of tree
16. vary the angle at which branches and/or trunks grow
17. weaken value of branches as it gets to peripheral
18. think front to back, darker comes forward
19. oval shaped trees are more appealing than round trees
20. if both sides are the same, take "bites" out of them

That should be most of it. May need to refer to Roberts notes for nice diagrams.

Mary Y
12-15-2010, 01:57 AM
Johannes,
Thank you for the excellent "nuggets' you are providing through the webinair, like many other people on wetcanvas I feel I have hit the motherload.Your method of teaching constantly reinforces the pertinent points.
I have been trying for several years to paint in a realistic manner so now I will have to try and get my head around abstract shapes and do some exercises to try and improve my understanding of values.


Robert ,
Thank you for your note keeping , I have had to leave for work on a few morning and thanks to your sketchbooks been able to read what Johannes has discussed.

Ron,
Thank you for the list on deciduous trees I missed the first due to work and the second because I was unaccustomed to Webinair.

I have read the earlier posts in this thread and someone mentioned capturing screen pictures from the webinair If possible could someone tell me how to do this as I cannot find where it is in the earlier thread.

hewill4giveu
12-15-2010, 02:19 AM
OH my goodnes ugh im listening to Johannas class i recorded today. I recorded it with the debut right. Well to anyone who is recording with debut be carefull . Here im thinking all im getting is what he is saying. NOT i was also getting my yak , yak and hubbys too yippie skippy. So dont talk or say anything you dont want recorded while doing a recording of the class while using deput. LOL see told ya i wasn't very computer literate ugh. Now i haveto try to listen over this gabby woman talking while johannas is talking(me) how rude LOL>

marionh
12-15-2010, 04:03 AM
Another wonderful tutorial and thanks for the additional notes Robert and oldradagast - certainly helps a lot as I always miss the last parts.

hewill4giveu - I have a fairly new laptop with Vista which is normally good for most things, so I can't understand why I have so much trouble.

Rugman - thanks for the notes on the deciduous trees, I missed many of the first ones and had not realised that he had already done deciduous.

To watch the tutoriall, I get a new link everyday in an e-mail. The initial link was specific for that tutorial, I think.

sundiver
12-15-2010, 05:40 AM
Was the webinar over early tonight? I got an error message with the emailed link, and a "This Webinar is over" message with the old link in the first thread, and that was at 5:35 EST.


Wendy, it is ongoing. Find it through his cyberartlearning.com, the school-buss Icon in the left column.


Thanks, Charlie! It was the only way I could get in. Anyone else have that problem?

Colorix
12-15-2010, 08:03 AM
Wonderful class on mountains, thank you Johannes! (We have no mountains here, but some bedrock cliffs I've been at a loss to portray, and this really helped!)

Access: If you sign up for the webinars, you'll get a live link in your email every day.

Robert, excellent beautiful notes as usual. Your red mountain really got lovely and melodic and zinging with the changes! The poppies did benefit with less tree! Would be cool to see a version based on J's advice, too, it'd be getting several paintings out of one ref! And last but not least, thank you for your very kind words on my study. Too kind, but I love you for it!

Dan, thank you! Really like your idea of taking texture a bit further in, and making the mowed lines clearer. These bales were cubes, truly, (title's a hint) which is why I yelled "stop the car" to my husband, grabbed the camera and shot a quick pick between rushing cars. So unusual, I mostly see the white-wrapped stuff. Oh, I'd definitely start over, and Bigger, this study was to work out problems -- or to find out the risk-taking didn't work.

Hope I didn't miss anyone's comment. Wooly head from having it so densly packed with so much info!

allydoodle
12-15-2010, 08:07 AM
Ron,

You are the man - Yeah! thanks very much!

susanc
12-15-2010, 09:40 AM
Oops maybe I misspoke. The beauty of colors shows up well in the MID VALUES.

Unbelievable! Johannes is quoting me! I'm famous! Sadly for the wrong reasons...Anyway, no--it wasn't you. I initially wrote MID VALUES when I wrote that post, but didn't trust my memory so I checked my notes, which turned out to be wrong. I remember when I wrote those notes, I was frantically scribbling away, trying to catch up with what you were saying at the time so I must have short-circuited and put down the wrong value name. But since "mid values" is what actually stuck in my memory, I'm sure that's what you really said. But nice of you to phrase it that way...

susanc
12-15-2010, 09:46 AM
Don't worry about the recordings. You will be able to get them in a couple of days.

What great news. Can't wait! But I will pretend I didn't see this because I really adore the concept of my son fixing dinner while I'm watching TV!

susanc
12-15-2010, 09:57 AM
What was the name of that magazine Johannes pulled up that showed Frank Serrano doing a plein air painting demo? I think it would be perfect if that magazine did a full feature on Johannes' Cyberartlearning site. It would definitely be a kind of cross-advertising possibility if things work out well with North Light. I would have been all over cyberartlearning if I'd seen it featured in a magazine and read students' opinions like the ones expressed in the news clip video.

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 10:24 AM
What was the name of that magazine Johannes pulled up that showed Frank Serrano doing a plein air painting demo? I think it would be perfect if that magazine did a full feature on Johannes' Cyberartlearning site. It would definitely be a kind of cross-advertising possibility if things work out well with North Light. I would have been all over cyberartlearning if I'd seen it featured in a magazine and read students' opinions like the ones expressed in the news clip video.

Thanks my friends for all your support and wonderful comments. I believe the time is ripe for these online classes. What is common knowledge is that more and more people are getting their information from online sources now and fewer people are reading. Quite a few newspaper and magazines have suffered such as Newsweek that sold their company due to low subsciptions and newspapers filing for bankruptcy. Universtities are giving online classes all over the world. As we have all seen this teaching method is working so well and I am still getting full rooms in the webinar. I got three webinar messages already during the classes that people were rejected due to capacity.
Almost everyone has a computer now. Now every middle class home has a computer and are as common as TV's. In fact statistics show the internet is getting more viewing than TV. The baby boom generation is on the verge of retiring. What I hear from you is that you would rather be watching these webinars much more than TV. I believe that's why there are 225 people signed up for these webinar classes and has been increasing steadily every day. Also the TV content has gone from bad to worse. I read that Larry King is being laid off because of the huge drop in ratings. What suprises me is why the TV stations have not smartened up and put better content on instead instead of those shows that try to make us think we are dumb.
One way or another we will continue together. There is so much ahead now. The next step would be to give you exercises and monitor you as you progress as well guide you to strengthen your compositions. I am so positive that those of you who are highly interested in this will be such good artists. I believe in you. I see it. You have passion and that is what it takes. Most of you can sit there for 4 hours in class. Once the frustration of the insecurity is gone and you will have tools to work with. It is such a wonderful joyful experience to paint effortlessly like ballerinas and skate dancers. I believe in you because of how you express your motivation. So let's keep on truckin!!!
As I finished typing this message I checked CNN of course on line and saw this.
http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/0,28757,2036683,00.htm?hpt=C1

I already see bonding happening in this group.

Sorry Susan I don't remember the magazine about Frank Seranno.

susanc
12-15-2010, 11:05 AM
Sorry Susan I don't remember the magazine about Frank Seranno.

Oh no! Don't tell me I made that up, too! Well, at least I get an "A" for creativity, then.

I know that American Artist magazine has a sister mag called something like "Workshop for Oil and Acrylic Painters" that I feel would be an excellent place to feature cyberartlearning's workshop style. I thought maybe the Artist's magazine had a similar type magazine when I thought I saw the Frank Serrano cover. I'll keep looking but don't anyone be surprised if I can't find it, I guess!

I actually found it (http://serranofineart.blogspot.com/2010/11/be-sure-to-get-you-copy-of-painting.html) but, of course, I was wrong. It was also published by American Artist. Too bad--wrong company!

mcbru
12-15-2010, 11:29 AM
Johannes,
I don't know who I can and can't speak for, so, only for myself right now. The thanks are to you. Everything time one sees a jump in any sort of industry, whether it's teaching, social networking, engineering, whatever, it's because someone stood up and said "I have an idea". You are such a person. Many thanks, we'll see you this afternoon.
John Brubaker

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 12:00 PM
Johannes,
I don't know who I can and can't speak for, so, only for myself right now. The thanks are to you. Everything time one sees a jump in any sort of industry, whether it's teaching, social networking, engineering, whatever, it's because someone stood up and said "I have an idea". You are such a person. Many thanks, we'll see you this afternoon.
John Brubaker
Yes, and companies like people in charge that come out with new ideas in their board meetings even if the idea isn't good but at least it shows they are thinking and are involved not just drawing a pay check. I am thinking big here. Why does face book have 500 million people? It is our nature to be in contact with others. Imagine we have the chat option where you can chat with others during classes as well as getting the intruction. I can see students using small video cameras that cost no more than 39 dollars to put on their paintings while I am watching to guide them along. Oh my gosh I see huge potential with this! All this happening live! I am seeing myself doing a painting while the rest are following. Of course I would use something better than the social video streams so the students can get a whole screen fill up.

beejane
12-15-2010, 12:02 PM
I know that American Artist magazine has a sister mag called something like "Workshop for Oil and Acrylic Painters" that I feel would be an excellent place to feature cyberartlearning's workshop style.

I have(had) a subscription to the Workshop magazine, but my last issue had an insert that said this will be the last issue as the magazine will no longer be published. Another victim of our move to online learning perhaps.
I sent this letter to Jennifer, which hopefully will make some of these magazines realize that their magazines are failing, not because of lack of interest but because we have found a better way of getting our information.

Dear Jennifer,
I understand that the Wet Canvas forum has become associated with the Artist's Magazine. This sounds like a well thought out match. Through the wet canvas forums, I have been taking the online classes with Johannes Vlouthuis. Even though I have many CD's, books and magazines, and have taken various workshops, nothing has worked as well as the cyber classes for making an idea sink in. It must be the combination of critiques of our work, or other students works, examples from best artists, photoshopped changes in real time, and the instructors abilities to quickly change from written words, paintings, sketches, and photos that helps with our learning.
As a former teacher, I can recognize teaching and Johannes can teach. He has the knowledge and the ability to make things sink in. I hope that somehow we won't lose this resource and that through the wet canvas forums, or through your magazine, we can continue these lessons.
The former magazine world is changing and art magazines must change with them. The online world is going to become our way of learning.I'm sure there must be someway of working out a system so that on regular basis we can log on and for a set fee take part in a class. There isn't anything else out there for people like me who live in small rural communities.
Barbara Jack
Canada

susanc
12-15-2010, 12:04 PM
Right before I stumbled across the Clyde Aspevig thread, I watched a dvd called "Nuts and Bolts" by Quang Ho. He teaches at the Art Student's League in Denver. He said he has seen people painting there for several years whose work never improved even though they were there, week after week, painting steadily away. They paint the same apple, the same way, over and over, never improving. I would have probably done that, too, if Johannes hadn't stepped in to educate us. Even then, old left brain habits die hard and I'll probably blow it from time to time. Painting yards of canvas is good, but it's far better when someone shares their insights with you and you open yourself up to those new possibilities. Otherwise, that will be us, painting those same apples over and over again. That sounds like such a waste to me! (Although I'm sure it was fun, it wasn't very productive.) I can't thank Johannes enough.

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 12:11 PM
Right before I stumbled across the Clyde Aspevig thread, I watched a dvd called "Nuts and Bolts" by Quang Ho. He teaches at the Art Student's League in Denver. He said he has seen people painting there for several years whose work never improved even though they were there, week after week, painting steadily away. They paint the same apple, the same way, over and over, never improving. I would have probably done that, too, if Johannes hadn't stepped in to educate us. Even then, old left brain habits die hard and I'll probably blow it from time to time. Painting yards of canvas is good, but it's far better when someone shares their insights with you and you open yourself up to those new possibilities. Otherwise, that will be us, painting those same apples over and over again. That sounds like such a waste to me! (Although I'm sure it was fun, it wasn't very productive.) I can't thank Johannes enough.

Yes, Susan and that's why this must continue to help all of you break out of those habits and to paint with authority. I know that as long as all of you have the interest and the drive we will make it happen together. One way or another!

sundiver
12-15-2010, 12:26 PM
Access: If you sign up for the webinars, you'll get a live link in your email every day.



Oh, I get the emails. But the links don't work in my case. All I get is an error message.

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 12:50 PM
Oh, I get the emails. But the links don't work in my case. All I get is an error message.

This does not work?
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/186041342

Adriana Meiss
12-15-2010, 01:15 PM
Sundiver,
I simply run the program (yellow flower icon) from my desktop and it connects me to the webinar.

Colorix
12-15-2010, 01:16 PM
Johannes, thank you so much for everything!

Are you about to post the photo we're to crop in 3 different ways?

susanc
12-15-2010, 01:39 PM
I've tried to use this over the last couple of nights but it just freezes up my computer.

Marion, I'm sorry that program freezes up your computer. I felt good recommending it because I have it on a new laptop and on a 5-year old clunker that I gave up on in July because it was decimated by a malware attack (son-induced, of course!). I was finally motivated to resurrect that computer so my son could do his homework while I kept watching the webinar. The only "problem" I had on either computer was that the recordings are pretty huge unless you change the settings. I never tried it in timer mode...

It must have been so frustrating to have it lock up your computer! Unfortunately, my computer fix-it advice is limited to "run many, many, many different malware scan programs (especially one that does a scan during boot up)", which undoubtedly has no bearing on your problem with this software!...I really wish I knew how to help you with it. Again, sorry!

oddman99
12-15-2010, 02:12 PM
This message sent to Johannes this AM, which he requested I post here.

Hi Johannes,

First off, let me add my congratulations and gratitude to those already expressed by so many others at WC for your Webinar presentations. They are appreciated. I caught the CTV interview, too. For this I commend you, as it portrays you as being a genuinely fine person, a far higher compliment, in my opinion, than one who presents webinars.



Now, I have a question for you about your position regarding the plein air vis-a-vis the studio painting. My premise in my question is that the plein air exercise is one where the painter reconoiters the site to investigate, evaluate and gather information on and of the scene, generally for use as reference in the working up of a larger and perhaps, more finished painting. Much of the essential information recorded by an on-the-spot painting cannot be obtained satisfactorily by a camera. What has to be done is to choose a good vantage point, compose the masses and leave out EVERYTHING that does not contribute. Paint what is there, not what is not there. Capture the essence of the scene, the spirit of the place, and work efficiently. Time and timing are of the essence for, the lighting changes, the weather changes, it rains, it snows, it's cold, it's hot, black flies may abound, etc.



Under these circumstances, wouldn't it be better to do any re-invention in the studio? There, with the plein airs at hand along with other sketches, photos and reference materials the artist can best make any needed adjustments and inventions. Melodic lines, design of abstract shapes, re-scaling objects, reversing the actual lighting on selected objects, introduction of fantasy items, colour harmonization, etc., can all be handles in comfort and leisure.



You mention that none of the painters you admire, except for Jim Wilcox, consider their plein air studies as prime candidates for sale. Oh, they may sell on here or there, but they consider them as references and not of sufficient quality to offer for sale.



Could you please clarify whether it is that you advocate the enhancement of the scene be done on the spot, or back in the studio on the final work up. Or, did I misunderstand and the plein air sketch is actually intended to be the final painting? In this case, of course, everything necessary should be done to perfect the painting.



Again, many thanks for the excellent lessons. I look forward to your response by return e-mail or on tonight's Webinar.



Best regards,

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 02:30 PM
[quote=Colorix]Johannes, thank you so much for everything!

Are you about to post the photo we're to crop in 3 different ways?[/]
As mentioned yesterday here is the photo, The homework is that you come up with three different compositions using what I taught you. Please post your results in the wetcanvas thread. as you discuss with each other. See you tonight.

Ruthie57
12-15-2010, 03:12 PM
I'm going to have a go at this. Johannes, do you want photo crops or thumbnails or both?

I stayed as long as I could last night but I get headachy when I'm overtired and I'm not a late night person. Your sessions start at 10pm here in the UK.

I really appreciate the time you're giving to doing this! I think I've already learnt a lot....just a case of putting the theory into practice now.

oldradagast
12-15-2010, 03:12 PM
Not sure if we're supposed to post the cropping compositional homework here or not, but here goes:

(Unfortunately, I cannot get either the Uploader or even the file attachment tool to work, so I'll just have to try to describe the compositions in words. Sorry... if the system ends up working again, I'll post what I have.)

CROP 1: Focus on the trees on the left and push the mountain in the background. The central mountain may not even be in this composition.

Problem: Aside from the typical need to add melodic lines, notice the tree that rudely lines up perfectly with the left mountain peak? That'll need to be fixed.

CROP 2: Focus on the mountain itself. Basically, zoom in on the central mountain and the distant shoreline, but keep the mountain away from the center of the painting. Put its peak near the edge of the painting, but watch the abstract shapes and negative spaces.

CROP 3: Focus on the sky above the mountain. Zoom out from the right side of the photo, leaving plenty of sky above the mountain. Again, the mountain will be left of center, but it will feel smaller beneath the majestic sky.

Problem: What majestic sky? It's as blue and boring as it can be! Need to add some clouds, light, and action here to avoid a dull painting.

beejane
12-15-2010, 03:43 PM
Here are three crops. I don't have any experience with mountains and find them a bit scary, all tall and pointy like. Rather rough looking creatures, dominating anything around them. They do make nice backdrops, though.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/99014-crop_one.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/99014-crop_two.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/99014-crop_three.JPG

I reversed the first one, trying to create a left to right entrance, and put the trees in the most valuable spot.
The second one doesn't work as well. It's too straight, so would need lots of changes to find some harmonic lines.
I like the third one best, because you can enter and move into the painting

LynnM
12-15-2010, 04:08 PM
Thanks, Johannes, for this opportunity. I guess we should be trying to keep the images pretty small, there'll be a lot here...are these too big?

Well, here goes.....

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/97813-Crop-1.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/97813-Crop-4.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/97813-Crop-3.jpg

The first one concentrates on the mountain and the possibilities for a nice melodic line in the shoreline. The second is rather like trying to ignore the elephant in the room, but has possibilities. The third gives the mountain the full treatment.

Adriana Meiss
12-15-2010, 04:10 PM
Hi Johannes,
Here are the possibilities I see.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/41853-WebinarHWcrop1sm.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/41853-WebinarHWcrop2sm.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/41853-WebinarHWcrop3sm.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/41853-WebinarHWcrop4asm.jpg

Adriana Meiss
12-15-2010, 04:15 PM
I forgot to add that I find this kind of homework extremely interesting. I think any person considering plein air work would benefit form it.

marionh
12-15-2010, 04:18 PM
Here we go

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/42113-johnanes_copy_1_640x480.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/42113-johnanes_copy_2_640x480.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/42113-johnanes_copy_3_640x480.jpg

Ruthie57
12-15-2010, 04:24 PM
Well, I've tried everything but can't upload at the mo. How annoying! I'll try again later............

robertsloan2
12-15-2010, 04:28 PM
That explains why I didn't see it - I get Artist's Magazine but not American Artist. Used to get both years ago but instead have been subscribing to all three F&W ones.

edtree
12-15-2010, 04:28 PM
I can't upload or attach either. I share your frustration and disappointment.

appydax
12-15-2010, 04:29 PM
Here are mine
Sharron

1) I would reduce the height of the l/h tree.
621361

2) Simplify the foreground grasses.
621371
3) Cut in the front/right land mass more.
621381

robertsloan2
12-15-2010, 04:48 PM
I came up with five crops before I realized I was overdoing it. I'm bad on the math. The photo is so full of information I could get a dozen different ideas. I could have easily kept going zooming in on this or that interesting feature, peak, clump of trees, reflection etc.

All five of mine are attached. Each has a different theme and point of interest. The fifth one happened almost by accident and made the mountain look huge, the center of interest would probably be that snow patch in the four-star spot.

Oh that is annoying! The upload for attachments failed too. I can't add images in any way. But I got five crops out of it.

#1 just balanced it with the main peak as theme and center of interest but included half of the island with tall trees.
#2 composed around that island or peninsula with tall trees at the left.
#3 themed on the reflection of the main peak.
#4 showed none of the island but focused on mountain as theme again.
#5 zoomed in close on the mountain and made it loom dominating the picture, with the trees to the right of the island the only ones in it.

They all looked pretty good to me, but I can't post them. I am so annoyed!

Talley
12-15-2010, 04:49 PM
Here are my possible crops. I really need to learn how to use the Photoshop Elements on my computer.
621401

621421

621411

Colorix
12-15-2010, 04:50 PM
Had so much fun with these I almost forgot to go to the webinar! :lol:

And now the #@& uploader doesn't work, nor the attcher. :mad:

aolaranora
12-15-2010, 04:51 PM
OK, here is my version.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/177144-DSC02238_copy.jpg

this would be perhaps my favorite panoramic view. I would modify, however line of mountains before painting it... just a little.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/177144-DSC02238_copya.jpg

This is my second favorite crop. I stayed away of pines on a left and made a waterway "entrance" to the painting. I would slightly modify this and that here... mostly- mountains.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/177144-DSC02238_copyb.jpg

and this is a "portrait of the mountain". Doesn't have to be modified much before painting. however this one is not my personal favorite.

luvs2paint1
12-15-2010, 04:53 PM
I woke up this morning so excited for class and to do my Home work. I got distracted finding the pic and got caught up in tweeting, sharing on FB and blogging about the interview, that I ran out of time b4 I finished the 3rd composition. This is my blog http://brendathour.blogspot.com I hope it's ok Joe. Love ya!

Dharma_bum
12-15-2010, 04:58 PM
Here are my crops.

In the first, I would knock that big tree in the middle down a bit, and knock down the mountain on the right side.

#2 I would downplay the lone dark pine lining up with the peak, and maybe put a few small clouds on the right side to break up the sky. Also gumbyize the sides of the mountain so that they don't create triangles, or exit the painting at the same point.

#3Gradate the sky to make the expanse on the right more interesting, and again, play down that one really dark tree on the left.

wcjan
12-15-2010, 05:25 PM
Missed the first few minutes of the webinar - did Johannes update on his discussion w/Jen at F+W?

sundiver
12-15-2010, 09:12 PM
This does not work?
https://www3.gotomeeting.com/register/186041342

It worked tonight. (Came home late, surprised to find you still on after 4 hours!)
Nothing worked last night except clicking on the school bus.

Grainne
12-15-2010, 09:35 PM
We just finished another great 4 1/2 hours . . . this is getting addictive! :D

Grainne

lam
12-15-2010, 09:41 PM
I have really enjoyed listening to Johannes' advice and lessons on landscape art. Thanks very much, Johannes!

Barbara01
12-15-2010, 09:49 PM
Another wonderfully informative session tonight, and after only a few classes I find that I'm completely addicted to Johannes landscape webinar's. They provide lots of inspirational material and review for me that is just the kind of thing that I need after being away from art of so long. It's great to see so many talented artists submitting their art for critique, it reminds me of those art school days, only better I think.

robertsloan2
12-15-2010, 09:49 PM
Eight pages of notes tonight, I hope the uploader works now. At least for attachments.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-15-1.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-15-2.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-15-3.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-15-4.jpg

JTMB
12-15-2010, 09:50 PM
Hi folks,

Here are my three crops. I opted to do one that was basically a square format, one a wide landscape format and one somewhat vertical.

621641

621651

621661

luvs2paint1
12-15-2010, 09:53 PM
What a great class that was! Even though I get so tired, I just can't leave when Joe is teaching. I am so happy that I have a laptop because when I do get tired I can take my laptop with me and lay down, or sit in the recliner.
I worked on the homework. It definately isn't as easy as I thought it would be. So lets see if I can attach mine. Wish me luck.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/58166-BrendaTcomp1.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/58166-BrendaTcomp2.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/58166-BrendaTcomp3.jpg
:clap: Yah, I did it!

*Deirdre*
12-15-2010, 09:53 PM
I have really enjoyed listening to Johannes' advice and lessons on landscape art. Thanks very much, Johannes!
I must say I was not into landscapes very much as a subject - but I have listened to a few of his webinars now and find them very good. His obvious enthusiasm and knowledge of the subject is infectious! :thumbsup: Thanks for the heads up Paula!

robertsloan2
12-15-2010, 09:55 PM
Four more pages:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-15-5.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-15-6.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-15-7.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-15-8.jpg

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 09:56 PM
I'm going to have a go at this. Johannes, do you want photo crops or thumbnails or both?

I stayed as long as I could last night but I get headachy when I'm overtired and I'm not a late night person. Your sessions start at 10pm here in the UK.

I really appreciate the time you're giving to doing this! I think I've already learnt a lot....just a case of putting the theory into practice now.

Only crop the photo for the time being. You should end up with 3 distinct compositions.

Esmeralinda
12-15-2010, 09:56 PM
Fantastique ! thank you for another great session !

Robert, your notes are absolutely wonderful, thanks !

Thank you to all the other members that share as well :wave:

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 09:59 PM
Missed the first few minutes of the webinar - did Johannes update on his discussion w/Jen at F+W?
F&W and I are talking. Hopefully we can have an announcement in a few days.

Violetta
12-15-2010, 10:08 PM
Johannes, you webinar is fabulous! I have only caught bits and pieces but each one has been a gem. I haven't been painting landscapes lately but I'll need to do one soon after all your inspiration.

BTW, do you only paint/teach landscapes or might you do something on portraits too? Hmmmmmm? That's my current passion.

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 10:16 PM
Johannes, you webinar is fabulous! I have only caught bits and pieces but each one has been a gem. I haven't been painting landscapes lately but I'll need to do one soon after all your inspiration.

BTW, do you only paint/teach landscapes or might you do something on portraits too? Hmmmmmm? That's my current passion.

Yes I plan to give a lecture on professional tips for portraits eventually.

hewill4giveu
12-15-2010, 10:29 PM
This is an awesome way to learn from someone. I know i post everyday seems but every day just when i think what can he come up with next i mean he has spent hours upon hours so far. Yet he finds something else to share that is invaluable to everyone. This method of teaching is far better than trying to understand it in a book or dvd. I prefer dvd over book or paper. With it live you not only get questions you think of but questions others bring up about how to fix issues or what to do with each painting presented. You do not get that with a dvd or book. There is so many things i would love to hear him talk about. Because im a beginner basics such as color theory, values, hues, etc the basics for beginners even. But even as a beginner the things he is teaching to me covers all levels of artists. Its done in a way that anyone can understand. I may not remember it all when i sit down to paint. I know tho as time passes i will apply more and more of what he is teaching. Thank you Wet Canvas for encouraging this type of teaching. Thank you yet again Johannes for everything.

Johannes Instructor
12-15-2010, 10:34 PM
This is an awesome way to learn from someone. I know i post everyday seems but every day just when i think what can he come up with next i mean he has spent hours upon hours so far. Yet he finds something else to share that is invaluable to everyone. This method of teaching is far better than trying to understand it in a book or dvd. I prefer dvd over book or paper. With it live you not only get questions you think of but questions others bring up about how to fix issues or what to do with each painting presented. You do not get that with a dvd or book. There is so many things i would love to hear him talk about. Because im a beginner basics such as color theory, values, hues, etc the basics for beginners even. But even as a beginner the things he is teaching to me covers all levels of artists. Its done in a way that anyone can understand. I may not remember it all when i sit down to paint. I know tho as time passes i will apply more and more of what he is teaching. Thank you Wet Canvas for encouraging this type of teaching. Thank you yet again Johannes for everything.
Gosh I wish I could remember everything I am teaching as well while painting. At least I would not have to go back and fix my errors. LOL

hewill4giveu
12-15-2010, 10:42 PM
Well i tried to upload my three clips for the class but it wont let me put them in here . I know there not to big too ugh. This is what i get

Ack! There was an error copying your file - email us ...

robertsloan2
12-15-2010, 10:52 PM
Time to try again with my crops:

Square format:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Photo-Crop-1.jpg

Emphasis on trees:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Photo-Crop-2.jpg

Emphasis on reflections:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Photo-Crop-3.jpg

Crop 4 rectangular but similar to first one:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Photo-Crop-4.jpg

Crop 5 major emphasis on mountain, majestic mountain:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Photo-Crop-5.jpg

I could do a series of a dozen paintings on this one reference and not run out of cool things to paint, especially zooming in on particularly cool peaks or tree clumps or other elements.

Violetta
12-15-2010, 11:03 PM
Johannes wrote:

Yes I plan to give a lecture on professional tips for portraits eventually.



Thanks! That will be wonderful! How will we know what lectures you will hold and when? Do you have a sign-up sheet or an email list?

Dougwas
12-15-2010, 11:04 PM
In the past eleven days, I have learned more about painting landscapes than I have in the past four years. Johannes makes these sessions so informative, and when you add his enthusiasm, it makes for a great learning experience. This is what I have been looking for. There is nothing like this anywhere else and I am so greatful to Paula Ford for letting us pastel painters know about Johanne and the webinars.

Johanne is a born teacher. You can hear the joy in his voice when he is explaining some new "golden nugget." And you can tell he doesn't know how to tell time. I think the shortest of his "one hour sessions" lasted three hours.

Johanne, I am so glad you decided to make us part of your life. I am greatful beyond words.


Doug Wasilieff

hewill4giveu
12-15-2010, 11:08 PM
Gosh I wish I could remember everything I am teaching as well while painting. At least I would not have to go back and fix my errors. LOL

OH i am so glad im not the only one. Going out of town next week so wont be able to put this into practice on canvas right now . But i am going to take photos i have and do my abstracts of them. To get use to seeing my photos in abstracts. As well as seeing things i need to change. So when i do get to come home and paint i will be ready to go. Rest asured your teaching will not go to waist with me.

allydoodle
12-15-2010, 11:19 PM
Okay, I've done my version of two crops. Here they are:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/93075-webinar_homework_1.jpg


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/93075-webinar_homework_4.JPG

When the uploader is working again, I'll do the third.

susanc
12-15-2010, 11:40 PM
Oops, it worked! (I didn't have a lot of time. You guys got my hopes up when you said it wasn't working! If I have more time, I'll try again.)

Apparently, court is now in session!

I should have pretended I was in Gumbyland but instead, I looked for a focal point for each one on the 1/3, 2/3 principle, tried to make sure the corners were different, especially at the bottom (failed with the one with sky all the way across but can probably do a gradation of some sort). I tried not to divide the sky and land perfectly in half. I did manage to get a pine tree almost smack dab in the center of the little island scene, but since this is Gumbyland, it can be moved, right?

I remember Johannes saying something about a mirror water image being boring so I probably shouldn't have done that :o But I liked it better than that grass in the foreground...any excuse to get rid of some green.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/1697-cropping_trees.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/1697-croppingmtns2.jpghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/1697-croppingtrees3.jpg

It's interesting to see what everyone has done with this! (Mine are too close to Chris'--I think I like hers' better but I don't know why.:confused: ) Robert, you crack me up! Thankfully, this is not about math. Though I might have been better off if it were...

Dharma_bum
12-16-2010, 12:24 AM
All right, I'm going out on a limb here, because this breaks a lot of the rules, having a lot going on through the center of the picture, but I still like it, find it very restful and stately. I like this better than my third crop, which just feels unbalanced, so I'm going to substitute this one. . The one thing I don't like is the way the mountain leaves the left edge of the picture, that could be gumbied up somewhat. I would probably alter the line of the dark shape on the left side of the mountain so that it didn't run down out of the picture. At any rate, I'm curious about what "the boss" has to say about this comp. :D

Dharma_bum
12-16-2010, 12:36 AM
I am really enjoying this class, the specific nuggets of technique, the comprehensive composition strategies, and the critiques, which help to drive everything home. The language used is memorable. Meatballs, no fly zone, pizza crust, melodic line, and abstract shapes are now permanently etched into my brain. :D

Dougwas
12-16-2010, 12:54 AM
Here are my three crops.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/102199-Crop1.jpg


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/102199-Crop2.jpg


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/15-Dec-2010/102199-Crop3.jpg

Doug

painterly_peg
12-16-2010, 01:37 AM
Wow...nice to see this link. I have taken classes by Johannes. I learned much from him and if he is around...Many Thanks!

hewill4giveu
12-16-2010, 01:42 AM
http:// (http://wetcanvas.com/forums/)http://thumb7.webshots.net/t/82/182/8/56/8/2386856080106166367mbEVzX_th.jpg (http://wetcanvas.com/forums/http://thumb7.webshots.net/t/71/171/1/2/93/2937102930106166367DXGKHR_th.jpg)


http:// (http://http://thumb7.webshots.net/t/71/171/1/2/93/2937102930106166367DXGKHR_th.jpg)http://thumb7.webshots.net/t/71/171/1/2/93/2937102930106166367DXGKHR_th.jpg (http://outdoors.webshots.com/photo/2937102930106166367DXGKHR)


http://http://thumb7.webshots.net/t/82/182/8/93/80/2950893800106166367YAmqMQ_th.jpg
Of coarse i love the whole full view of the pic but with a number of changes like the land mass on the front right. The trees on the left need the lightining on top and some lightened in the back for depth. I dont like the little tree either it goes or moved something. The straight line on the far lake shore needs a melodic line. The peaks on the mountain i think should have more shapes to straight . I Dont like the little mountain in front. Either it needs to have some shape change or something to me its distracting from the big mountain. Im guessing at all of this i have never done it before. Trying to remember some of the things that Johannes suggested. LOL probably wrong in every way but i tried LOL

winecountry
12-16-2010, 02:56 AM
My 3 crops

It's late I chose then did some moving of things, trying to break up the reflection of the mountain, I like the square formats crops people have put up.

one with mountain, one with lake, one with trees


sorry uploader is not working at all, will have to try later

sundiver
12-16-2010, 05:43 AM
Well i tried to upload my three clips for the class but it wont let me put them in here . I know there not to big too ugh. This is what i get

Ack! There was an error copying your file - email us ...


That's what I'm getting, too. I'll sure be glad when the techies get it figured out.

appydax
12-16-2010, 06:06 AM
Great to see all of these crops.
I love panoramic and square formats and as I use pastels I mount/mat them myself so I never have a standard 800x600. I came up with 9 crops and much preferred the panoramic, no surprise there :lol: but decided to give myself the extra challenge of trying to get them into the standard 800x600 to see what I could come up with. I posted them last night.

Curious if people paint to size of what they have available in canvas/paper or do you go and buy in especially for the crop you have in mind.:confused:

Really enjoyed the first half and off to watch the rest now...I am in the UK and can only stay up so long plus I would rather take in the information from Johannes while I am as fresh as a daisy, too valuable to waste on a tired brain. :smug:

Thank you Johannes once again and here to more of those :music: lines.
Thanks you Robert again for those notes.....your hand must be aching.

Sharron

Colorix
12-16-2010, 06:42 AM
Had to give up early last night, wasn't feeling too well (sitting up all nights takes a toll on me, but I do it as much as I can, which shows how much I value these webinars). So the great value of Rob's notes are extra evident today!

Trying the uploader... Nope... no working.

marionh
12-16-2010, 06:50 AM
(sitting up all nights takes a toll on me, but I do it as much as I can, which shows how much I value these webinars).

:thumbsup: I have extra matchsticks at hand. :lol:

I haven't lasted for the whole time yet.

allydoodle
12-16-2010, 08:10 AM
Okay, the uploader cooperated :evil: , so here is my third crop:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/93075-webinar_homework_2.JPG

robertsloan2
12-16-2010, 09:02 AM
I enjoyed seeing everyone else's crops. I didn't look at anyone else's till I'd done mine, didn't want to be influenced. One thing about mine - I knew that in each of them I'd have something to Gumby - one of my favorites has the mountains entering and exiting at the same height, but in general I like it and thought positioning the peak was more important.

I hope he lets us do this as a painting. For one thing it'll be fun seeing it done in so many different mediums, some pastels, some oils, some watercolors and so many different styles.

Yesterday it occurred to me that Pan Pastels would let me work much closer to Johannes' oils style - with the added advantage that it stays "wet" indefinitely and can accept changes. The colors mix like oils if you layer them and the wedge sponge acts like a flat or bright brush for type of stroke.

appydax
12-16-2010, 09:13 AM
Robert, I am from the UK so could you tell me what is *Gumby* I have heard it mentioned quite a lot.
Thanks.
Sharron

Colorix
12-16-2010, 09:17 AM
Yippee! Uploader deigns to do its job!

Massive Mountain:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/117343-Mountain.jpg


Tree 'island', mountain as bg (would not have crevice shadow line up with tree, though):

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/117343-Tree.jpg

Water, w reflected mountain:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/117343-Water_w_Mountain.jpg

And for fun -- what would happen if mountain got smaller?:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/117343-Trees_w_S_Mountain.jpg

No, I can't count.... :rolleyes: Could do many more...

susanc
12-16-2010, 09:28 AM
Ouch. Last night was a tough night. I already knew that I stink at painting trees and grass and that I'll undoubtedly show Johannes the first ugly painting he's ever seen...but I thought I could at least design pretty well. Now that's blown, too.

So, anyone who is hanging back from submitting your crops, you've seen mine. You have no excuse--I don't think anyone could do worse. Jump in and join in so you'll get even more out of this opportunity! That's what's keeping me going--hoping to improve, and my addiction to the smell of paint and how it feels under the brush and the yummy palette color mixes that I :heart: even when my paintings don't turn out...

I'm going to try to buckle down today so I can finish my commission in the next couple weeks or so :crossfingers: :crossfingers: to finally put more time into this.

*Deirdre*
12-16-2010, 09:48 AM
Robert, I am from the UK so could you tell me what is *Gumby* I have heard it mentioned quite a lot.
Thanks.
Sharron
Could it be the same as our Morph? An inanimate piece of plastercine that is moved and reshaped to form something else...

appydax
12-16-2010, 09:53 AM
Ah, never thought of it like that Deirdre, but putting together what I have heard from Johannes I think it is like our Morph.
Thanks.
Sharron

LynnM
12-16-2010, 10:28 AM
Here's a little video introducing Gumby

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AcoKEsaoa6I&feature=related

Takes me back to when my kids were little!

ZanBarrage
12-16-2010, 10:47 AM
In the season of giving, I think Johannes is our Santa :clap:. There are so many that would have kept all this information to themselves or at the very least teased us with some and then found a way to make us pay for the rest. That would not be unfair mind you. There is value to everything. Johannes is not that kind of man. He gives from the heart and wow what value.

I have to admit that at first I really thought that Jo would eventually slow down and, having created interest, he would (fairly) ask for us to put some monetary value to keep things going. A week passed and not a sign of slowing down. As a matter of fact the sessions kept getting longer and longer and more and more valuable and full of golden nuggets.

I am now at a stage that I am worried about HIM. His love for the art and his generous nature remind me that giving has its own karma. Some how, some where, this man will get back the love that he has given all of us. From the heart. I am learning every second during the sessions, and while I am enjoying the heck out of all of this, I am starting to feel guilty that we are piling up a debt of Karma similar to the one my family is piling on my credit card :eek:. Jo, somehow we will all repay you your deep and caring and generous tutorship. For now, God bless you for what you are doing SantaJO!:wave:

Ruthie57
12-16-2010, 10:51 AM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/189061-1.jpghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/189061-2.jpghttp://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/189061-3.jpg

There, at last!! Daren't write much in case the pics disappear lol. My Favourite is no.3 and I would put a little more green in the RH corner but no detail and the value would be similar to the water.
Phew, I've been trying on and off all day to upload!

Chrisp47
12-16-2010, 10:51 AM
Nice little video, Lynn. The point is Deirdre; we can push, pull, bend, stretch shapes to what ever we like. Just like Gumby.

appydax
12-16-2010, 11:04 AM
Thanks for the clip, it confirms it is the equivalent of the UK's Morph.
Sharron

oldradagast
12-16-2010, 11:11 AM
Another excellent webinar yesterday, with a focus on critiques. It was amazing how a good painting could be improved in various ways by applying the concepts Johannes has taught us. Often times, it was a subtle change - something that one woudn't see at first - that made all the difference.

Lynn 592
12-16-2010, 11:15 AM
Hello everyone,
I want to thank Johannes for giving us his time and expertise. He is a gifted teacher. I'm usually a lurker here on WetCanvas, but not any more!

Thank you again!
Lynn 592

Davkin
12-16-2010, 11:20 AM
I am now at a stage that I am worried about HIM. His love for the art and his generous nature remind me that giving has its own karma. Some how, some where, this man will get back the love that he has given all of us. From the heart. I am learning every second during the sessions, and while I am enjoying the heck out of all of this, I am starting to feel guilty that we are piling up a debt of Karma similar to the one my family is piling on my credit card :eek:. Jo, somehow we will all repay you your deep and caring and generous tutorship. For now, God bless you for what you are doing SantaJO!:wave:

I've been feeling the same way. I do kinda feel guilty for receiving all this wonderful instruction so freely and easily, (of course putting it all into practice is another matter) but Jo is building up a huge balance in his Karma vault for sure and will be repaid in many ways I'm certain. I just hope some day I'll be in a position to "pay it forward" so to speak.

David

ZanBarrage
12-16-2010, 11:32 AM
Sorry for the messy stuff. I am doing this on my lunch hour at work and no PS here :)

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/86381-jo1.JPG http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/86381-jo2.JPG http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/86381-jo3.JPG

ZanBarrage
12-16-2010, 11:34 AM
Scratch #2 it has too many problems including similar corners and a bad crop at the bottom right.

susanc
12-16-2010, 11:35 AM
Great posts! But I'm really disappointed that no one has come forward to stink with me yet. (Hmm. Maybe I'd get better results if I rephrased that?) Please, someone--anyone, have pity! Don't let me stink alone. Come on, lurkers, it's time to get real. (Uh huh, I'm looking at you!) This isn't just for the WC rock stars (I hope!) I'm loving these crops and look forward to seeing more. We're here to get better and the best way is to participate. No pain, no gain? Etc...(Mom would be so proud!) No matter what level you think you are, please keep the crops coming. Johannes has something here for all of us, no matter what level we're at.

winecountry
12-16-2010, 12:17 PM
looks like the uploader is working now...my 3
Mt, lake, trees

susanc
12-16-2010, 12:21 PM
Jo, somehow we will all repay you your deep and caring and generous tutorship.
I agree with everything Zan said. Right now, IMO the best way we can repay Joe is to point people here if we're in a local art club, and commit to do the exercises he gives us, which is a way of showing that we really do value his time and instruction. I might be mistaken, but I hope our energy level in this thread will help keep him vitalized and reinvigorated. I have to admit, I was a little hesitant to talk him up when the webinar room registration was almost filled to capacity (and I always have to arrive late to the webinars so I was worried I'd get shut out one day), but since he's not selfish, I couldn't be, either. This has been an unbelievable experience. Thank you!

P. S. Still looking for someone brave enough to stink with me! :wave:

LadyMadonna
12-16-2010, 12:33 PM
I wish to add my accolades to this unique and amazing forum of learning. I have sat by my computer night after night with my headset taking notes ..listening and watching to Mr Johannes reveal his secrets to helping us become better artists each in our own unique way.I am very new to all of this and my brain is like a sponge and I am enjoying all of it.
This is my Christmas gift ..so thank you so much !

Grainne
12-16-2010, 12:35 PM
P. S. Still looking for someone brave enough to stink with me! :wave:

Not sure I know what you mean by this . . . :confused: :D


Grainne

winecountry
12-16-2010, 12:50 PM
the karma I feel most is to make better paintings....if I can realize my potential then I think he will feel paid back in full....and I will have something to give to others from my experience, remembering how generous he was to me.

Also a note that he is giving to those who have passion to do it, maybe the key that is unlocking the flow to us.

Johannes Instructor
12-16-2010, 12:55 PM
I am painting in my studio and figured I would just turn on the webcam if anyone wants to watch. Here is the link to see the video. Sound is muted.
http://cyberartlearning.com/webcam/webcam1size.html

robertsloan2
12-16-2010, 01:08 PM
Zan, Johannes mentioned that during one of the classes. What he wants us to do in return is to do the same when we get the opportunity - share our skills, teach, help others. Pay it forward. It's a principle that completely makes sense to me and whenever I run into someone who holds that idea, I feel good inside.

You're right about his karma. He deserves something wonderful to come into his life, unasked and unexpected, something as life-changing and happy as this course has become for me. I think that'll come to him, life works that way. Thanks for posting what you did.

I love all of the crops. I know I could analyze them and on many, maybe most of them to do a good painting would also take stretching or shrinking or changing what's in them. Charlie, I like the "more distant mountain" one you did, you took it a step further with that one.

Anyone else realizing sudden changes in how you do things? Usually on challenge paintings I'll choose an element and crop but still pretty much stick to the reference, but the farther I go in this course, the farther I go from my references. When I do my next version of the meadow with poppies, I'm going to work from my pastel study rather than from the photo. I don't need the detail if I'm going to keep it impressionist but with the sketch I already worked out which colors and which pastels to use, as well as some of the textures.

Colorix
12-16-2010, 01:09 PM
A couple of us have encouraged people from our society to attend, and I think we're now some 6 ppl! A drop in the ocean, maybe, but as we give on... if each gives to 6 new people, and they give... soon the whole world will be involved. Or nearly. :-)

I so believe in giving forward. And, as Johannes said, the best way to learn is to teach. I mean, if we don't teach it too, who'll appreciate the melodic line we make? ;-)

This kind of knowledge cannot be lost, it has to be taught. The secrets should not die with the masters, the secrets must become common knowledge!

Some of it is in Carlson, which I can see now that it is explained to me.

winecountry
12-16-2010, 01:11 PM
the web cam thing is way cool!

VladK
12-16-2010, 03:02 PM
Thank you Johannes for every lesson(I managed to attend). All are great experience and since the first one I started to revise my works and found a lot of problems. Still working on them.
It'll take months or maybe years to make it work automatically, but still it worth it to learn to be able to do it right. I'm a beginner, read a lot of books on art, but your instructions are very practical and obvious. I always have that feeling that I knew it, in my subconscious mind, but would not be able to express. Only great teachers like you can give it to knowledge starving others. So thank you for sharing that knowledge.

And special thanks for Robert, with his great notes. I've created a PDF file from first couple of lessons, and even printed in black and white it looks great.

Unfortunately, I was unable to upload it - the size limit for this forum is 1MB. If anybody needs it shoot me an email ([email protected]) and I'll email it to you.

Oh, my homework:)
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/204616-Johannes03.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/204616-Johannes04.jpg
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/204616-johannes_02.jpg

ZanBarrage
12-16-2010, 03:07 PM
Hi Vlad,

I am sure Jo will mention this but I have seen it in a few crops so far so I thought I would start the ball rolling. In your last two crops, you fell in the trap of keeping the pine tree right under one of the peaks, repeating the motion :)

You are not alone LOL.

SonyaJ
12-16-2010, 03:09 PM
Here are my three versions (hoping the uploader works finally :rolleyes: ). I don't have PS Elements, so anything that is fuzzed out in the photo indicates I'd alter it in some way. I'd also add some type of clouds - the sky just seems too flat without them.

Emphasis on Mt. Moran and its reflection:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/187416-teton-crop01.jpg

Emphasis on the abstract shapes of the trees and their reflections, and a square format, to boot:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/187416-teton-crop02.jpg

The whole scene, cropped to remove some sky and foreground (which I would probably keep, but alter). I also found the strong contrast of the darker area of Mt. Moran to be distracting, so I'd probably soften the edges or close in the values there:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/187416-teton-crop03.jpg

VladK
12-16-2010, 03:13 PM
Hi Zan,
I might be not right but I would call it musical repetition, for it does not go directly in sync with the first (mountain) melodic line.

But these trees give us an important point in foreground, based on which viewer can judge the depth.

susanc
12-16-2010, 04:04 PM
Not sure I know what you mean by this . . . :confused: :D
Grainne

Grainne! Thanks so much for playing, but sadly you don't qualify at stinking. In case it doesn't translate well into other languages or cultures, I'm looking for someone who feels that they're not as good as all of the WC painting rock stars we've seen critiqued so far, and would like the moral support of someone in a much lesser league (me!) I kind of stink at painting--and design--right now. Actually, really bad. I hope to get better, but you never know! If that gives anyone some comfort to join me in here, please do. Right now I feel a little bit alone.

And by the way, sadly, I haven't learned my lesson and am about to recommend some more free software! If you don't have any cropping software, I know that Irfanview (http://www.irfanview.com/) will do it. In Irfanview, just make a selection box on the photo with your mouse, then hit Ctrl + Y to crop.

Can anyone else recommend a good free program so maybe we can get more participation? I think someone mentioned Gimp (http://gimp-win.sourceforge.net/stable.html)? I've never tried it but it looks like it has a lot of features similar to Photoshop.

appydax
12-16-2010, 04:12 PM
The thing for me about what Johannes is doing is not a *do this and do that* approach on it's own. He is going deeper than that and giving us the ability to read our references and paintings. Creating thought patterns and processes which in time with repetition will become automatic. At first it seems as if we will never hold all the information, but I can see in this thread already that the knowledge is being put to use bit by bit. I know that he is only just scratching the surface of what he is sharing so willingly. Let us all hope that we may be allowed to continue working with Johannes.

Looking forward to tonight, not long to go. :music:

Sharron

Ruthie57
12-16-2010, 04:16 PM
Hi Vlad,

I am sure Jo will mention this but I have seen it in a few crops so far so I thought I would start the ball rolling. In your last two crops, you fell in the trap of keeping the pine tree right under one of the peaks, repeating the motion :)

You are not alone LOL.

But not everyone has photoshop! My crops, and maybe several others, are straight crops of the photo. Of course, when it comes to translating that photo to a thumbnail, then a painting, these anomalies will be ironed out :)

Susan, I'm relatively new to landscape too and I know I'm not as good (yet) as many of the people whose paintings have been critiqued in the webinar. I'm not prepared to accept that mine are "stinkers" though, just the work of someone who still has a lot to learn and will enjoy every moment of that journey :) . Don't put yourself down either!!

winecountry
12-16-2010, 04:23 PM
Susan how you feel now is a place we have all been at one time no matter how good you think we are now. Also at least for me this "susan" self still resides inside, even tho I've won awards at the highest level, have shown with artists like Bateman, had my work in top end galleries etc. For some this little "susan" never goes away, for others it was never there, and the ego was so strong they thought they were great even when they started and weren't:lol: ....

The trick is not to give this part of you much attention, it is not where the art comes from anyway, and even the very best artists know a great painting comes with a flow that can't be duplicated. In spite of how you feel or what the voices inside are saying, just keep working, if you do you will get better and better. You have the drive, and now you have the information that will guide you along, with or without mentors. Even when you do really good work, a year later you have learned so much that seeing last year's work could make you go...OMG what was I thinking....Try not to look at the results as being the goal, look at the journey you are on as the sweet place. For myself, I try to be detached from completed work after its done good or mediocre ,( except for a very very few say 1 in 300 or so) and put my attention on what I'm going to do next, that's always where my greatest passion is.

Don't compare yourself with others, there will always be greater ones than you and always worse, what matters is finding what you are, and having the courage to step out.

I can tell you with all my experience, starting landscape is just like starting over, I'm as disappointed and "stinking" as you are right now....but I will not let this affect me, I intend to master this to at least being competent so I can give my animals a place to live, and maybe sometimes even paint a good landscape. I hope this does not sound like a lecture, it is meant to say I am with you at the same place you are not stinking alone:thumbsup:

Colorix
12-16-2010, 04:39 PM
There are no 'stinkers'! There is just knowledge, and mileage = hard work for years, so, Susan, if you've painted your first landscape a week ago, you have a wonderful exciting journey ahead of you. Think! -- you're getting the right tools from start, and do not have to re-think and re-learn, not to mention 'un-learn' ingrained bad habits. And, at some point in time, everyone here was a week from their first landscapes, and remember how hard it was.

Grainne
12-16-2010, 04:50 PM
My "homework" . . . with a "titch" of VERY rough Photoshopping :)
Trying to implement some "nuggets" about composition that I have learned.

#1
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/28471-Crop_1.jpg

#2
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/28471-Crop_2.jpg

#3
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/28471-Crop_3.jpg


Grainne

crazywoman53
12-16-2010, 06:21 PM
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/137465-JOHANNES_PHOTOcrop1.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/137465-JOHANNES_PHOTO_crop2.jpg http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/137465-JOHANNES_PHOTO_crop3.jpg

Here are my three. Obviously there are things that would need to be adjusted in all three of these. While you guys are getting into this with Johanne I am sitting here drooling over the computer cause I can't connect to the webinar tonight.. slow internet service. If this class does what everyone is hoping it will I guess I will have to invest in something to solve this problem. I feel like a junkie who can't get to her "stuff". I may have DT's by tomorrow..

Chrisp47
12-16-2010, 06:52 PM
Some of you are wondering how to post questions and comments during the Webinar.
You can't be heard unless Johannes gives you the mike.
You can't normally see other peoples questions/comments.
To question/comment find the little red/orange arrow, press it. The screen will change, you can type in question/comments in the box shown.
To be able to use the mike press the little hand up. It will change to arrow down. When Johannes acknowledges it, he can give you the mike.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/165919-webinarquestions.jpg

robertsloan2
12-16-2010, 11:32 PM
Chris, thanks for the screen shot of the little red arrow me and everyone have been describing. That'll help so many!

Before I post my notes, here's two landscapes I did today. Both are up for critique. Also to test my self critical skills, in my view the December Landscape Challenge is a botch with a few hits in it and the sepia monochrome is tons better even though it's so simple and careless. I think I got a lot more right brained playing with the sepia:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-December-Landscape-Challenge-Watercolor-Sm-Moleskine.jpg
December Landscape Challenge
3 1/2" x 5"
Daniel Smith watercolors on pocket Moleskine watercolor journal
photo by Paula Ford

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-A-Winter-Memory-sepia-WC.jpg
A Winter Memory
3 1/2" x 5"
From memory/imagination, sepia Daniel Smith watercolor on pocket Moleskine watercolor journal.

Photo of A Winter Memory:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-A-Winter-Memory-sepia-WC-photo.jpg
Color is way off but more of the light values show. Also more variations in the darks show, values are much more accurate in the photo.

susanc
12-16-2010, 11:32 PM
The crop critique was not at all painful. There were a lot of submissions, so it didn't get too personal and individual, which is fine with me. Joe just talked about the correct principles. All in all, I got some things right, and I got some wrong, like the mountain was probably too close to the top of the frame. He even showed us one of his painting goof-ups afterward. My conclusion--there's hope for me. No one should hesitate about doing the assignments. If you're a beginner like me, you won't feel like quitting afterward! You'll feel like you're actually starting to "get it".

robertsloan2
12-16-2010, 11:56 PM
Susan, I'm not a beginner but felt like one again from the first five minutes - in a good way. I know I had things wrong with all my crops too and you're right, it wasn't painful. Nor was it painful how he critiqued my pastel sketch. His critiques always show how it can be better - and he said there's no such thing as a bad painting, just that they can be made better.

I paint better than I used to and not as well as I will.

That's been my motto for years and I think it's true of every artist that keeps learning and growing - including Johannes. He said something like that in class several times, how he looks back and sees the changes in his work when he learns these things.

Here's tonight's notes!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-16-1.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-16-2.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-16-3.jpg

robertsloan2
12-16-2010, 11:59 PM
Second batch:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-16-4.jpg
Johannes asked me to fill in the areas a little more solidly in my sketches, so I'm trying to do that. It isn't always easy though when I'm trying to draw fast and keep up with the lecture while doing the illos!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-16-5.jpg
The diagram at the top for No Fly Zone is a new little nugget expanding on an old one. Not all sides of the No Fly Zone are equal. Clouds chasing off the top are nowhere near the problem that things jabbing in from the bottom are and the sides aren't as important as that "first step into the painting." I hope that diagram helps make it clearer!

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-Class-Dec-16-6.jpg

hewill4giveu
12-17-2010, 12:33 AM
Robert i dont know how you keep up and still watch what he does. Im so glad that i tape them. Was going to send it to one of the members until i realized it was recording every sound in the room . My mic was on but daughter told me where to go and turn it off. Windows cuts it up in smaller chunks. LOL some of his talks are 5gig . Im having to clean my computer off and my external hard drive to hold them all. But putting them in WMM to splice it in smaller parts for cds. I just wanted to say thank you for your notes i was going threw the 1 week which i missed all of it. But your notes are wonderfull. So i just copied them all for good measure should something happen to my videos.

Flo5548
12-17-2010, 01:37 AM
As this is a new thread, I'll repeat my question which is the last entry of the old thread.

I am trying to find Johannes' website but I don't have his last name so it is prooving difficult. Can anyone supply me with a link to his site?

Thanks in advance.

Johannes Vloothuis

Dougwas
12-17-2010, 02:07 AM
Here is a site with Johannes' work. http://www.artplace.ca/index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userprofile&user=97&Itemid=62

Doug

Ruthie57
12-17-2010, 05:15 AM
Oh, shame, I missed the critique of the landscape *homework* crops. Must've been after I dragged myself off to bed!
If someone could put a summary of the discussion about cropping that picture in here I'd be very grateful.

marionh
12-17-2010, 06:06 AM
Oh, shame, I missed the critique of the landscape *homework* crops. Must've been after I dragged myself off to bed!
If someone could put a summary of the discussion about cropping that picture in here I'd be very grateful.

Me too:lol:

marionh
12-17-2010, 06:12 AM
Robert, once again wonderful notes.

I understand the 'no fly zone' now. I missed all the earlier webinars and missed this. I know Johannes mentioned it a lot and I sort of guessed what it was, but your notes make it crystal clear.

Question - would this 'no fly zone' be a applicable to still lifes and florals to some extent?

marionh
12-17-2010, 06:15 AM
Doug thanks. It's a wonderful body of art, isn't it?

One of the things this is doing is opening my eyes to American painters that I had never heard of, and discovering their art.

noge
12-17-2010, 06:32 AM
Super :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
Thank you for sharing this :thumbsup:

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 09:06 AM
Robert, once again wonderful notes.

I understand the 'no fly zone' now. I missed all the earlier webinars and missed this. I know Johannes mentioned it a lot and I sort of guessed what it was, but your notes make it crystal clear.

Question - would this 'no fly zone' be a applicable to still lifes and florals to some extent?

yes, we are to paint the way the human eye sees. The stronger part of your painting is to agree with the fovea of the eye.

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 09:08 AM
Johannes Vloothuis
http://cyberartlearning.com/onlinegallery

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 09:11 AM
Here is a site with Johannes' work. http://www.artplace.ca/index.php?option=com_comprofiler&task=userprofile&user=97&Itemid=62

Doug

This is more complete

http://cyberartlearning.com/onlinegallery/

Colorix
12-17-2010, 10:02 AM
Johannes's good crops, screen-clippings thereof

Flat blue is booooring, the marked area will 'kill' your painting (as will that much sky):

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/117343-Flat_blue_is_boooring.JPG


Mountain

A better crop of a mountain view:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/117343-Mountain_a_better.JPG

THEN do a thumbnail, to design it even better. Left mountain moved behind main mountain:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/117343-Mountain_good_thumb.JPG

ALWAYS do thumbnails after cropping, do design the picture, you will discover problem areas.

Water

A good start-crop -- do not leave triangle of fg grass, re-design or remove:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/117343-Good_water_crop.JPG

Thumbnail (This should be on top of Water section, don't dare to mess with the uploader to move it up...):

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/117343-lake_thumb.JPG

If this much water, make *very* sure that the water is interesting. The marked area cannot be flat blue. Put in reflections, ripples. He didn't like this one, but it illustrates how to shrink the mountains to give the water the most square inches, as a mass.


Lenghten the left tree-reflections = nice lead in:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/117343-Works_long_tree_mirror_is_lead_in_plus_cloud_reflect.JPG

More cropped:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/117343-Works_better.JPG

I missed some of the variations, but main thing that stuck with me was the importance of leaving at least a little bit of sky somewhere, "so the bird can fly out of the painting". If no sky, it feels to caged in.

Colorix
12-17-2010, 10:06 AM
Finally, Trees:

This is the surprise crop, going in real close:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/117343-Tree_crop.JPG

NorWestPainter
12-17-2010, 10:14 AM
This was actually really fun to do, I should do more of these.

Colorix
12-17-2010, 10:18 AM
Ooops, wrong forum, please disregard.

Ruthie57
12-17-2010, 11:18 AM
Thanks for that Charlie!

LynnM
12-17-2010, 11:19 AM
Yes, thanks, Charlie, I missed it too.....hard to organize things at this time of year to watch every evening....but I'm trying!

susanc
12-17-2010, 12:52 PM
I know Johannes didn't want to get into philosophy(?) last night. (He might not want to get into it on this thread, either! Sorry if that's the case--it's so personal, we undoubtedly will disagree about it.) For the most part, he seems to be teaching us competency. But I think he touched on something else that also raises a painting above the others. I think a great representational landscape must be painted both competently (the assertive, confident brushwork, beautiful shapes and lines, and eye comfort) + also have magic (the dancing, the mood, the drama, the feel of capturing a fleeting moment, like it is about to breathe. Maybe the assertive brushstrokes belong here instead? Oh, well.) For me, competency and magic (something special, timeless, that touches the soul) is what sets Clyde Aspevig apart.

Last night, when Johannes did a close up on one of his barn paintings, I felt magic in the cornfield, like a breeze was about to gently wave the vegetation and the glimmer of the sun would ripple along the edges. I couldn't take my eyes off it. It was incredible. I also felt magic in the waterfall that his son likes, where the lower part of the fall was running and burbling, and I could almost feel the little mist droplets and hear the rush of the water. Those things made my jaw drop. And isn't that watercolor he posted stunning?

IMO, Johannes already has every tool necessary to stand head and shoulders above the majority of landscape painters out there. So, why is he spending time on teaching us? That boggles my mind. But maybe because of what he is doing, landscape painting won't become a forgotten art one day, like some oil medium recipes from the past. Maybe we can help raise the reputation of landscape paintings if there are less amateur paintings out there because of the information he has shared? I didn't think it was possible, but I am even more stunned than ever with this gift he has given us.

Thanks for recommending him to others, and for participating on this thread. I love seeing comments from lurkers finally speaking up, from those who are just joining us, and of course, from all my new friends who have participated in this journey from early on.

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 01:33 PM
This was actually really fun to do, I should do more of these. That is not bad at all. You have created some real good abstract shapes. Just make that shape less round at the right and you have a composition that is pleasing.

robertsloan2
12-17-2010, 02:07 PM
Charlie, thank you for posting those screen shots! They're great. All those points including Johannes's sketch - which was much better than my corresponding sketch in my notes. Of course it should be, he's that much better at landscapes!

Susan, I think it's not so much fewer bad or forgettable landscape artists. More that every new good one will draw attention to the subject and encourage growth for everyone.

susanc
12-17-2010, 02:37 PM
Susan, I think it's not so much fewer bad or forgettable landscape artists. More that every new good one will draw attention to the subject and encourage growth for everyone.

Robert, excellent point! I like that mindset better.
Also, thanks to everyone for their encouragement. It's rare to find talent & kindness combined (usually you get divas instead). I just want to point out to the lurkers that this is such a great group of people. Don't be shy--jump right in!

Zan, you might not relate to this painter's style, but to me she paints landscapes in a very abstract way, playing with color--Lisa Joyce Hill (http://www.lisajoycehill.com/galleries/)

Also, when Johannes talked about squaring round shapes in a couple of places, that reminded me a bit of Carol Marine's (http://carolmarine.blogspot.com/) still lifes. She really squares off her rounded shapes, and now I have a better idea of why. This isn't quite what Johannes was talking about, it's taken to more of an extreme. I just thought she had a unique approach, and of course, I love bright color!

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 02:51 PM
Robert, excellent point! I like that mindset better.
Also, thanks to everyone for their encouragement. It's rare to find talent & kindness combined (usually you get divas instead). I just want to point out to the lurkers that this is such a great group of people. Don't be shy--jump right in!

Zan, you might not relate to this painter's style, but to me she paints landscapes in a very abstract way, playing with color--Lisa Joyce Hill (http://www.lisajoycehill.com/galleries/)

Also, when Johannes talked about squaring round shapes in a couple of places, that reminded me a bit of Carol Marine's (http://carolmarine.blogspot.com/) still lifes. She really squares off her rounded shapes, and now I have a better idea of why. This isn't quite what Johannes was talking about, it's taken to more of an extreme. I just thought she had a unique approach, and of course, I love bright color!

Very good observation Susan. This is an example of design. Round shapes are boring. Though Carol's paintings take this to the exteme which is her style but when the concept is applied more subtlely even in more realist renderings the shapes will approve. I will talk about it more in a few hours.

DGrau
12-17-2010, 03:39 PM
Last night I asked Johannes a question pertaining to the size of a no fly zone area in terms of percentage. This was asked because a 1 inch border would be different in appearance on a 8x10 compared to a 3'x4'.
No one heard this question, though you may have heard his reply which was a suggested approximate of the margin of lined notebook paper as a consideration to start from.
Therefore if your painting expands or decreases, the approximate no fly zone would also expand or decrease proportionally..thought this may be of use to some of you

I wish to thank many of you for all of your notes, since it is rare that I am able to attend, and of course to Johannes from which these notes would never exist

Johannes~ you mentioned at some point that there were around 150 rules/concepts concerning landscape. You are doing so much that I feel presumptuous asking, but if you have a list of these which you could copy and paste I would very much appreciate it. If this would require a good deal of time on your part assembling them, then I would not ask you to go through all of the trouble, since you are devoting so much time already.
thank you
dg

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 03:48 PM
Last night I asked Johannes a question pertaining to the size of a no fly zone area in terms of percentage. This was asked because a 1 inch border would be different in appearance on a 8x10 compared to a 3'x4'.
No one heard this question, though you may have heard his reply which was a suggested approximate of the margin of lined notebook paper as a consideration to start from.
Therefore if your painting expands or decreases, the approximate no fly zone would also expand or decrease proportionally..thought this may be of use to some of you

I wish to thank many of you for all of your notes, since it is rare that I am able to attend, and of course to Johannes from which these notes would never exist

Johannes~ you mentioned at some point that there were around 150 rules/concepts concerning landscape. You are doing so much that I feel presumptuous asking, but if you have a list of these which you could copy and paste I would very much appreciate it. If this would require a good deal of time on your part assembling them, then I would not ask you to go through all of the trouble, since you are devoting so much time already.
thank you
dg
Many of them are posted in this thread and the previous one already.

DGrau
12-17-2010, 04:31 PM
thank you Johannes, I am getting through them slowly.

susanc
12-17-2010, 04:39 PM
The company that published Scott Christensen's 1st book made a pdf of the 1st 33 pages. (I think.) It's here (http://www.adrnet.com/portfolio/pdf/Pages1-33.pdf).

It's more philosophical than technique-oriented, but it also contains a few prints of his work to study. I made a list of master painters who inspire him and it might have come from this pdf. You can usually count on John Singer Sargent to be on a list of faves, and often Anders Zorn and Joaquin Sorolla.

My guilty pleasure is Jennifer McChristian (http://jennifermcchristian.com/). I think she captures a feeling of sunlight well, she has color bouncing all over the place, which of course, I love. She often paints with loose brushwork, too. (Looser than me anyway!) Her architectural forms feel like they're rock-hard, solid. I also admire her for doing gritty scenes of LA--that's probably not the easiest thing to sell. Her paintings capture the feel of LA perfectly for me. (Southwest Art) (http://www.southwestart.com/articles-interviews/featured-artists/in_plain_sight-2) J. probably won't like the red/pink she uses to warm up the sky, the super-sonic monorails everywhere, possibly the dark values...and maybe other things I'm too naive to notice yet! Am I wrong?!! :)

appydax
12-17-2010, 04:52 PM
I have a question about seeing values.
I work in pastel and have decided to group them into individual values and then again into colour. I have done colour swatches and greyscaled them but I still don't find it easy to see the differences in value.
Sure sounds simple but it isn't for me.:(

I know I mix on the paper too, but I still would like to see values.

Sharron

susanc
12-17-2010, 04:58 PM
Sharron, values are hard for me, too. My art teachers didn't spend much time on them and I think they're so important. Maybe Joe will give us some exercise suggestions before the webinars are over?

winecountry
12-17-2010, 05:00 PM
I have a question about seeing values.
I work in pastel and have decided to group them into individual values and then again into colour. I have done colour swatches and greyscaled them but I still don't find it easy to see the differences in value.
Sure sounds simple but it isn't for me.:(

Sharron
IMO you can only go so far in mechanically doing the sorting, values depend on surroundings too, and on the colors mixing from underneath. For instance I find starting with a darker value than it is and building to light works far better than just putting down the mid and working on that... and the colors sing more and the eye has a more delightful time, than just selecting the one value and putting it in...then there are all the warm cool pushes and those to depend on surroundings....I do group in 3 values in my box light med and dark, that also keeps them cleaner.

Colorix
12-17-2010, 05:06 PM
Sharron, squint, gently, look through the roots of your lashes, and you'll see value differences without so much interference of colour, it works for sticks in box, and dust on paper... or for that matter a landscape, or a still-life, or whatever whenever wherever!

hewill4giveu
12-17-2010, 08:44 PM
I am soooo bumed my computer shut down on me then i tried to get back in and the room was full ugh ugh ugh not happy not happy. I have so many gig of videos of his lessons on the compter it fussed and had to go threw a bunch of junk to get it back on . Now i will miss tonight so upset. I keep trying but keep getting the room is full . Having second thought about telling everyone about it lol

AlaskaDan
12-17-2010, 09:20 PM
I would love to have Johannes critique a painting or two, anyone know how I send them to him?

Thanks

Dan

Grainne
12-17-2010, 09:22 PM
Another great night tonight!

I learned so much about reflected light that I had never understood before. Can't wait to try to put it into practice!

I think quite a few people kept "knocking on the door" but couldn't get in. :(

Hopefully, Johannes will be able to get a bigger venue after the holidays. :crossfingers:


Grainne

Lynn 592
12-17-2010, 09:48 PM
Thank you Johannes, I've learned so much. I can't wait for tomorrow's webinar!

Lynn 592

robertsloan2
12-17-2010, 09:51 PM
Chris, thanks for the screen shot of the little red arrow me and everyone have been describing. That'll help so many!

Before I post my notes, here's two landscapes I did today. Both are up for critique. Also to test my self critical skills, in my view the December Landscape Challenge is a botch with a few hits in it and the sepia monochrome is tons better even though it's so simple and careless. I think I got a lot more right brained playing with the sepia:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-December-Landscape-Challenge-Watercolor-Sm-Moleskine.jpg
December Landscape Challenge
3 1/2" x 5"
Daniel Smith watercolors on pocket Moleskine watercolor journal
photo by Paula Ford

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-A-Winter-Memory-sepia-WC.jpg
A Winter Memory
3 1/2" x 5"
From memory/imagination, sepia Daniel Smith watercolor on pocket Moleskine watercolor journal.

Photo of A Winter Memory:
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/16-Dec-2010/70184-A-Winter-Memory-sepia-WC-photo.jpg
Color is way off but more of the light values show. Also more variations in the darks show, values are much more accurate in the photo.

Johannes, these are the two little landscapes I asked you to look at. I think the sepia study is better than the green one. I'd appreciate critique on both and some idea from you of why the sepia one looks better to me.

Thank you for devoting so much of your time and energy to teaching this class. Tonight's class was fantastic!

I've got 8 pages of notes to post. Reflected color makes an enormous difference in a painting - it can be the difference between it looking nice and looking ka-zam true, truer than realism.

Unfortunately, the uploader isn't working for me tonight. So I'll try again later if I'm still up, in the morning if I'm not. Usually it seems to work by the time class is over, but today I'm out of luck for posting them.

I will post them on Facebook tonight though, so here's a link to my profile page (http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1340283783) where you can see them in my photo album. I have several albums but one is listed as Johannes Vloothuis Landscape Class, so it should be easy to navigate. The eight newest posts are today's notes.

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 09:52 PM
Sharron, values are hard for me, too. My art teachers didn't spend much time on them and I think they're so important. Maybe Joe will give us some exercise suggestions before the webinars are over?

Remind me in the webinar tomorrow and I will.

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 09:53 PM
Johannes, these are the two little landscapes I asked you to look at. I think the sepia study is better than the green one. I'd appreciate critique on both and some idea from you of why the sepia one looks better to me.
Sorry Robert this one escaped me tonight.

Johannes Instructor
12-17-2010, 09:55 PM
I would love to have Johannes critique a painting or two, anyone know how I send them to him?

Thanks

Dan

For the time being email your critique submissions here:

[email protected]

AlaskaDan
12-17-2010, 10:14 PM
For the time being email your critique submissions here:

[email protected]

Thanks Johannes, I have forwarded some paintings for your consideration.

Dan

robertsloan2
12-17-2010, 10:15 PM
Emailed them! Wish I could've posted my notes. I'll try again just on general principles. Nope, upload failed both as an upload and as an attachment. This is getting so frustrating!

mtnrunner
12-17-2010, 10:34 PM
wow, Johannes, that was maybe the single most enlightening 60 min. I've ever spent regarding painting. I mean that.
I can't thank you enough.. you gave me so many great ideas to carry forward... and hopefully improve. What a difference the reflected color made.. and edges are always so important, and so easy to overlook. I'm learning.
And you were most encouraging too.. just want to again say thanks.
A gal in our plein air email group posted a notice about this webinar, and I jumped in thinking that it would at least be
something to occupy my time here while I'm recovering from the accident. I never dreamed that the instruction would be of the quality and benefit that it has proven to be. We are really fortunate that you are giving so much of your time and knowledge so freely. Thanks so very much.

luvs2paint1
12-17-2010, 10:49 PM
Wow, tonight's class was once again full of useful information explained and demonstrated in such a way that you can't help but understand. It's wonderful to learn in this unique way. Things that I knew but didn't quite click are now all falling into place, especially connecting and bridging your accents, and then attaching them to the frame on one side. I am understanding more about values masses and not jumping values and stacking. I can't wait for tomorrow's waterfall webinar. I am going to try my best to get some painting time in, in the morning. I need to work on my trees, and I am finally ready to take the bull by the horns and do that. So thank you Johannes, for your time and willingness to teach. I am actually excited about landscapes again. I will not do a painting without doing thumbnails and designing and paying attention to the abstract shapes in both the positive and negative shapes. I will not paint directly from the photo, and now I understand why.

luvs2paint1
12-17-2010, 10:52 PM
Did I mention that Johannes rocks?!!:thumbsup:

winecountry
12-18-2010, 12:19 AM
wow, Johannes, that was maybe the single most enlightening 60 min. I've ever spent regarding painting.

yes tonight he had such a superb painter he could go into the very top level concepts that make even a very good painting just go to the top of the mountain. The next time I have a very good work, I now have the little things that fine tune it beyond anything I've done ( not likely to have a good work for a while as long as I'm wading in landscape:lol:) but I have the tools in my tool box when I get there

He spoke of 2 important "secrets of the Masters" one reflected light the other carving the edges of round objects.

You all jump in here if I get it wrong or leave out something.

Reflective light only happens in shadows, in full light they are washed away by the sun. In the example he showed us of the still life he took the space between the orange and the blue and white pattern bowl and reflected the orange IN THE RIGHT VALUE into the bowl and on another orange put blue reflected IN THE RIGHT VALUE light on the orange. He took great care to get the value right and missed a few times using photoshop, but he knew what he wanted and when it was right the orange suddenly just glowed with life.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/103030-orange_reflection.jpg

it may be hard to tell he glazed a warm orange over the shadow on the bowl, and I don't have the screenshot of the orange with blue in the large picture

but here is the painting, the line is how the eye moves through the lights
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/103030-deb_oranges.jpg
BTW she's only been painting 5 years and is as good and better than a lot of gallery artists I've seen, she painted this from life

hewill4giveu
12-18-2010, 12:50 AM
Does anyone have the one of the horse my compter crashed and i never could get back in. Im getting ready for tommarrow.

winecountry
12-18-2010, 12:56 AM
I have the one where he was showing us about not centering the animal or person so exactly, and it could be improved by giving the horse more room to walk into.http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/17-Dec-2010/103030-debs_horse.jpg

hewill4giveu
12-18-2010, 01:29 AM
Oh thank you, i appreciate this so much. Getting my computer ready for tommarrow no crashes again (i hope) i had withdrawls tonight LOL

Barbara your work is wonderfull . So many great artists on here. Cant wait to get to painting.