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View Full Version : Can anyone assist me with a first-buy, Bob-Ross style?


MrBThatsMe
11-30-2010, 08:28 PM
I've been watching Bob Ross episodes before bed for ages now, as it helps me relax and fall asleep. With christmas coming up, the only thing that popped into my head when I was asked if there was anything I'd like was 'Bob Ross painting kit', as it's been something i've fancied giving a try for a while now but being a poor student I haven't had the funds.

After doing a bit of research, I've found that the Bob Ross official sets seem over-priced, likely due to the brand name. After asking around on Yahoo answers, I've had mixed results, so I thought I'd try a dedicated painting website.

Basiclaly, I need a set of oil paints (I've kinda chosen Winsor & Newton, as they are the most commonly appreciated brand according to a survey I seen), brushes/tools, and an easel.

1. I was set on buying a standard set of W&N Artists or 'Student' oil colours, but have since been told that Bob Ross used water based or water mixed oil colours (can't remember the specific term used). Is this true, and is it key to success when painting in his style, or will any of the W&N oil paints be ok?

2. I need an alternative to liquid white for the base coat, although I could just buy a tin of the Bob Ross branded stuff, but if there is equally good paint out there that is the same for a lower price, I'd prefer that option.

3. For an easel, is there any specific type of easel that I need when working with pre-stretched canvases or do they generally all have appropriate fixings to hold it in place?

Finally, if anyone is familiar with the Bob Ross painting methods and/or has experience in doing so, is there anything else you think is important to remember when buying everything?

I know his methods are frowned upon by some, but he's the reason I've found the inspiration to start painting so I definitely want to experiment with it :)

Thanks, Colin!

NancyMP
11-30-2010, 08:59 PM
Colin, for a very basic set of tools to get you started, here's a bare bones list. Get your primary colors first, and W-N is fine. Titanium White, Ivory Black, Cadmium Red Light, Cadmium Yellow Light, and Ultramarine Blue. You can add the secondaries later, but these colors will help you mix oranges, greens and violets with your new palette knife. You'll need a small portable table easel, brushes from small to large. As opposed to starting with a small amount of oil colors, you'll want as many brushes as possible so that you'll have a clean brush in the middle of painting without having to stop and clean one. I would recommend a firm #6 filbert for both small and larger works; tiny round brushes for detail; and flat brushes in 2, 4 and 8.

You'll also need turpentine (or OMS) and hand soap for cleaning, as well as a palette and pre-stretched, pre-primed canvases. Make sure you're painting under a good light, and TRY AS HARD AS YOU CAN TO PAINT FROM LIFE! Start with a still life, and you'll be amazed at what you'll learn to see!

If you are going to learn the wet into wet method that Bob Ross uses, you can use regular oils without medium, just be sure to pay close attention to the way he does it.

Almost forgot: paper towels and clean cotton rags for cleaning up!

stapeliad
11-30-2010, 09:38 PM
Hi Colin,
welcome to WC and the oils forum! :wave: You'll love oil paint, it is highly addicting and very fulfilling.

I really have to say this before I address specific points in your post- I do not think the Bob Ross style is a good way to learn to paint. Why not? It does not develop your artistic eye and will not give you a base knowledge in many of the things so important to painting: values, composition, color theory etc. I honestly don't mean to sound discouraging because I think you should definitely paint, I am saying you will have better results with working in a more traditional manner.

Working from life is the BEST way to learn. And that doesn't have to be complex- start with simple, single objects you find around the house (or grocery store).

1. I was set on buying a standard set of W&N Artists or 'Student' oil colours, but have since been told that Bob Ross used water based or water mixed oil colours (can't remember the specific term used). Is this true, and is it key to success when painting in his style, or will any of the W&N oil paints be ok?

No, he did not use water-miscible oils... watch any of his shows and you'll see how he bangs his solvent filled brush around. His own line of paints is formulated to suit his technique- I have never used them myself but hear they are stiffer than normal oils. You are best sticking with WN; it is good paint.

2. I need an alternative to liquid white for the base coat, although I could just buy a tin of the Bob Ross branded stuff, but if there is equally good paint out there that is the same for a lower price, I'd prefer that option.

If you absolutely *have* to paint BR style, please do a forum search on "liquid White". People have posted their recipes.

3. For an easel, is there any specific type of easel that I need when working with pre-stretched canvases or do they generally all have appropriate fixings to hold it in place?

Your easel will depend largely on your needs and budget. You can start out with something small and relatively inexpensive, like a table easel, or look through various easels and see what you like, what your budget is, and how much space you have.

Lastly, hang out here in the oils forum; you'll learn a lot. And please check out the FAQ at the top of the page.

:thumbsup:

DAK723
11-30-2010, 10:06 PM
In my opinion, if you want to paint in the Bob Ross style, then use as much of his material as possible. If you are new to painting, then his brand of paints should be good enough and considerably cheaper than the artist grade Winsor & Newton.

While you can replicate to a certain degree a liquid white substitute, it will be far easier to just get a jar of his liquid white. To reproduce the brush effects, you will need the same type of wide brushes that he uses - which in a couple cases are basically just your typical house painting brushes.

I notice that Dick Blick sells the Bob Ross Master Set for about $52, which seems like a good price for 8 tubes of paint, a jar of liquid white, 3 brushes, one knife and a DVD.

If you start painting a lot - then after a while you can begin to replace these items with higher quality materials, such as the W & N paints, etc.

As has already been mentioned, The Ross paints are not water mixable paints, but traditional oils. Ross used an Odorless Mineral Spirits to clean his brushes.

The Ross method will teach you the basics of painting - blocking in the larger shapes, working from dark to light, working from back to front, using as large a brush as possible, to name a few, but as others have mentioned, it is quite limiting. I learned oil painting from Ross's predecessor on PBS, Bill Alexander, so I can't argue against the techniques. What I would strongly recommend after you have done a few practice pieces, is to paint from life or from photos. In this way, you will learn to paint specific things rather than stereotypes, and will practice observation, which is the key to painting, in my opinion.

Don

monkhaus
11-30-2010, 11:26 PM
I'd agree that Bob Ross is not really a great way to learn to paint... but... if it brings you to painting then go with what makes you happy. If you really enjoy it you'll start looking at better, more traditional methods that will bring you further.

The Bob Ross Master Set does seem like a fine deal and he did use fans a fair bit so you might want to add one of those to your list. My, though, his brushes are expensive for the quality you get. So, on the Blick site pretty much any of the Artist grade brushes will be fine. Maybe start with Princeton or W&N because they are not too pricey and perfectly good to great brushes.

MrBThatsMe
12-01-2010, 12:58 AM
Hey thanks for the speedy replies. I know the Bob Ross method is often frowned upon by artists but I do really want to give it a go. I got into pencil sketching last year but find this painting style intriguing. One obviously important detail that I forgot to mention is that I'm from the UK so the cheapest I can get the master set for is £80 ($140 or so I guess). The Windsor newton paints bought separately along with other tools will surely work out cheaper.

Thanks for answering my questions though. I'll try to compile a list today and then pop back tonight and see what you think of my choices. :)

cremo
12-01-2010, 03:08 AM
Hi! I began painting after I saw several episodies of Bob Ross. I am now moving from wet in wet and trying different subject, but if it weren't for Bob Ross I would have never began painting.

So, in my opinion it worth while to give it a try. I never bought a single product of the official line, I was given some suggestion to substitute the roducts and now I am giving them to you:

1 - Liquid White is obtained by using Titanium White with 10%-20% of Stand Oil, it has to be at a "creamy" consistency.

2 - Black gesso can be obtained form normal acrylic gesso with some black acrilic color.

3 - The Winton color line from W&N is the most economic thogu the most similar to the BR line, some colors have different name from BR line, I should have a correspondace name, I will look for it and post it later....

That's just for starting, I have collected some material, if you get in touch with me I can send them to you by mail.

Please let me know how it works,
Ciao.
Gianluca. :wave:

dvf1973
12-01-2010, 06:35 AM
I never understood why he would be frowned upon.. IMO he was an absolute bad ass.. I mean I could see how everyone would get frustrated trying to follow someone that makes it look so easy. I cant speak on his products from experience,but you have infinite materials and possibilities in oils, start small and as you find your comfort zone, run with it.

cremo
12-01-2010, 07:59 AM
I can understand your point of view, but if you are a newby, and never tried oil, it is a good occasion to start, and then when tried maybe find some courses or else to learn a different style. In my case I did not have any opportunities to follow art classes, watching BR and trying to emulate him allow me to learn some basic techniques.

I didn't get frustrated, Bob painted a whole painting in one hour, I painted the same in 4 hours but at the end I was happy and ready to learn more.
:wave:

karenlee
12-01-2010, 10:12 AM
If Bob Ross paints are that expensive, and you could buy twice as much paint more conveniently by using Winton instead, well...:) that's easy...I'd go with the Winton, the Winsor Newton student grade paint. Eventually you would probably want to graduate to artist grade paint and leave the Bob Ross brand behind; then you can move up to Winsor Newton artist paints. As already recommended, invest the extra money in brushes. You will use them!
Have fun!

monkhaus
12-01-2010, 01:50 PM
If you're in the UK maybe Jackson's has them? If not then you can certainly get the Winsor Artist at a much better price than here in the states.

Crystal1
12-01-2010, 05:48 PM
Costco usually has an inexpensive plien aire easel for around $50.00 during the Christmas Season. This is a standing easel that can still be used inside--if you want to invest that much money to start with. Also, I'm a returning Artist with about 8 years away from paints and I'm finding it to be nearly the same as a Beginning Artist. Instead of using prestretched canvases immediately, I'm using one of the cheaper canvas pads for practice and trying out new techniques. I'm working on my first portrait now. I've started painting it 3 times, learned more and started with a new canvas pad sheet each time. Now I think I might be ready to put it on a prestretched canvas. It doesn't bother me to keep redoing it...I'm learning a lot each time. I started with using the Bob Ross style too. It's a nice beginning to be able to paint a picture that you're happy with and helps your ego some while starting. Happy Painting.

MrBThatsMe
12-01-2010, 10:00 PM
Hi! I began painting after I saw several episodies of Bob Ross. I am now moving from wet in wet and trying different subject, but if it weren't for Bob Ross I would have never began painting.

So, in my opinion it worth while to give it a try. I never bought a single product of the official line, I was given some suggestion to substitute the roducts and now I am giving them to you:

1 - Liquid White is obtained by using Titanium White with 10%-20% of Stand Oil, it has to be at a "creamy" consistency.

2 - Black gesso can be obtained form normal acrylic gesso with some black acrilic color.

3 - The Winton color line from W&N is the most economic thogu the most similar to the BR line, some colors have different name from BR line, I should have a correspondace name, I will look for it and post it later....

That's just for starting, I have collected some material, if you get in touch with me I can send them to you by mail.

Please let me know how it works,
Ciao.
Gianluca. :wave:

Thanks for that! I really would appreciate any extra info you have at your disposal. I'm not sure if my email address is visible to you on here or whether you'd just PM it to me, but either way I'm interested :clap:

@others - Yeah in the UK the Bob Ross Master Set is £80+ and after looking at alternative brands, it's looking to work out cheaper. Being a 'Master' set I originally thought it would include a tonne of stuff but it still seems very limited compared with the tools Bob would use on a typical episode of his shows. I'll do a search for Jacksons and see what I find. So far I've only really looked on Ebay and Amzon, with the assumption that they'd be hard to beat on price.

Thanks also for the tip to buy Winton. I didn't get a chance to make a list of materials to buy today but will try and get on it tomorrow so you guys can give me an opinion (my g/f came to see me and I also spent a good few hours clearing away snow + making an igloo, so..) :thumbsup:

monkhaus
12-02-2010, 12:19 AM
http://www.artraders.org/

Bob Ross site for UK & Ireland.

JWD
12-02-2010, 12:34 AM
Hello Colin....I was and old friend of Bob Ross and he got me started over 35 years ago to do something that I thought I could not do...paint...He started alot of artist to also get involved in painting... I see many artist using this method and teaching on youtube, etc. I believe it is helpful in all aspects...I believe it gives you some basic knowledge so you can eventually expand into other area's and styles...you will find great information in all of the WC forums...from all well knowledged artist, and the help they can give you is invaluable...Colin, another good supplier for artist supplys is www.aswexpress.com (http://www.aswexpress.com) If your going to paint as a hobby you can use the SoHo brand at a cheaper cost to get you started, then go into the higher quality paints as you advance...I am glad to see you take an interest in Bob Ross.....(Happy Painting)....Joseph:thumbsup:

MrBThatsMe
12-02-2010, 05:52 AM
http://www.artraders.org/

Bob Ross site for UK & Ireland.

Thanks for the link :) I hadn't come across this in my searches.

@JWD nice to hear from you, I agree it looks like a very good way of getting into painting. I watch his shows before bed on a regular basis but until now never really considered buying all the equipment to try it myself. Unfortunately the linkyou gave me is in $ so not much use to me in the UK :( Nevermind though :cool:

dcorc
12-02-2010, 08:12 AM
I'd recommend the W&N trent sketching easel - the best price I've found for one in the UK is here: http://www.therange.co.uk/invt/125340/

The "trent" is also sold in the US as "italian sketching easel" (I think W&N just rebrand it) - its steel, rather than aluminium, so its a bit heavier, which makes it pretty stable, and rigid, but its light enough to be portable - I've got several easels, but this one was recommended to me by David Kassan for the portrait workshop I attended with him, and I really like it as its sturdy but portable.

I'd recommend you go for W&N or Daler-Rowney paints in preference to the BR brand in the UK, on both price and quality. "Magic white" is just titanium white made sloppier with extra oil. and used as what is known more generally as a "couch" - namely a thin lubricating layer of medium to paint into.

www.jacksonsart.co.uk and http://www.lawrence.co.uk/ are a couple of the bigger online art-materials suppliers - and if you are near london, or can get into london for as shopping trip, the Cass Art shops http://www.cassart.co.uk/shops_01.htm generally have a lot of materials at very discounted prices.

I'd also recommend Rosemary&co http://www.rosemaryandco.com/ for brushes here in the UK. These are excellent quality at very good prices and fast delivery.

While BR can be a good intro to basic oil painting, one reason why many of us here are not fans, is that he teaches a formulaic way of painting. What many of us would prefer new painters to do, is that there are more time-honoured ways into painting which provide a solid grounding into methods and techniques which would be better for you to learn at the outset, and which would ultimately serve you far better, get you much further, than the BR approach.

We are very keen to help, and teach, right here at WC. By joining, you are tapping into an enormous resource - large numbers of people who know how to draw and paint, and are very willing to share their knowledge with anyone who wants to learn :)

Dave

MrBThatsMe
12-02-2010, 11:49 AM
Thanks for the links!

Yeah this site seems excellent. I joined a different site and asked a similar question but only got once response in 3 days. My registration wasn't authorised here for about 4 days but it's been worth the little wait :P

MrBThatsMe
12-02-2010, 12:30 PM
OK, I'm compiling a list of things I'm considering buying.

First the paints - W&N Winton, from Amazon.co.uk, in a wooden box. £29.99
•8 x 37ml Winton Oil Tubes,
•2 x Hog Brushes,
•1 x Pencil,
•1 x Wooden Palette,
•1 x Plastic palette knife,
•1 x Sansador Low Odour thinners,
•1 x Putty rubber,
•1 x Double dipper

I'm not sure what the colours are exactly, This is the pic on Amazon:

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/02-Dec-2010/475691-31o8V2H7FsL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

(http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/newreply.php?do=newreply&noquote=1&p=11536191)

I'm not sure how accurate that pic is, or if it includes titanium white or ivory black. It does seem like the best value set out of the bunch available on amazon though, at least from a beginner standpoint. Although, what would I know :o

Alternatively, I can buy 37ml tubes of Titanium White, Ivory Black, Cadmium Red Light , Cadmium Yellow Light, Ultramarine Blue as suggested by NancyMP, for a total of £14.75.

Thoughts?

*EDIT: I just seen a box of 10 37ml tubes on Ebay for £19.50 delivered:
•Cadmium Yellow Pale
•French Ultramarine
•Pthalo Blue
•Viridian Hue
•Permanent Green
•Yellow Ochre
•Burnt Sienna
•Ivory Black
•Titanium White

I'm now thinking that this may be the best option? (sorry for the huge post)

wetbob
12-02-2010, 12:51 PM
I was and old friend of Bob Ross and he got me started over 35 years ago to do something that I thought I could not do...paint...
Bob Ross is a great way to start. HAVE FUN. Show your work and enjoy painting And remember think as the tree.

AngelinaHolland
12-02-2010, 01:19 PM
It depends whether you want to be able to mix Bob's colours as well. Then you need some that aren't in the list and some of the list you won't need.
Bob uses
Van Dyke Brown,
Phtalo blue, (for the sky)
sap green, and also (check this as I always mix 'em up)
something like burnt sienna or dark umber. But I'm quite sure it ain't the burnt sienna. (it's the one that's NEVER in the standard sets, haha. burnt umber??)
Bob is also into yellows:
Indian yellow,
cad yellow (but I get the alternative, which is, if I am correct azo yellow = cheaper) and don't think the light version but dark.
yellow ochre.
Alazarin crimson (he uses that an awful lot)

Bob uses these colours an awful lot. I made do without the Indian yellow, but got me a tube and am very glad I did! You need all these different shades of yellow/orange.

I hardly ever use the ultramarine, Bob didn't often use it either if I remember correctly. For his work the phtalo blue is more important.

Get a large tube of Tit. white, you usually need it a lot and the small tubes white run out a lot faster than the colours.
I never used the liquid white, too expensive. If you find the "recipes" (online) for making your own, you can get away with it. I often simply use titanium white with medium to thin it a bit.

Many of Bob's choices have to do with the transparancy of the colours. Certain colours red or yellow are imperative to obtain the effects, based on them being transparant or not. I'm no expert on this, but he definitely was!
So if you want his effects and have no real knowledge of transparancy yet, I'd say stick with his colours. You'll learn why and how along the way.

Furthermore, Bob often used a fan brush. Very handy and nice to have! You can make froth with it on waves, his famous evergreens, clouds and so on.
I wouldn't go nuts on brushes straight away. Good brushes cost a bomb and sometime you find out that one particular type doesn't suit you. Waste of your money. Get a few and test which type you like to work with. I find this is very personal.
I got 2 good quality brushes from the hardware store for painting things like clouds/sky. Some quite expensive ones but also a few very cheap ones, made in China, 10 for a Euro, lol. I find that sometimes these cheap bristle things are quite handy and I don't have to worry about trashing them.

And do invest in a bar of soap to clean your brushes. They're not expensive and they keep your brushes in pristine shape!

Oh, and of course the diagonal pallet knife! Can't do Bob Ross without it and it is VERY handy indeed! Making paths, mountains and so on. Wonderful tool!

Good luck!

MrBThatsMe
12-07-2010, 03:47 PM
OK I've trawled through various websites and made some decisions about colours etc.

The list I have made, and intend to purchase tomorrow is as follows:

Winsor & Newton Winton, 37ml tubes:

•Phthalo Blue
•Prussian Blue
•Alizarin Crimson
•Van Dyke Brown
•Burnt Umbre
•Sap Green
•Yellow Ochre
•Cadmium Yellow
•Ivory Black

•120ml. Titanium White
•Also, 236ml Bob Ross Liquid White

Brushes:

•Winsor & Newton "Oil Hog Bristle Brush" Fan size 3
•1", 2" & 3" hog bristle brushes
•R.G.M Palette Knife no. 109

Easel:

•Winsor & Newton Ribble Beechwood Tripod Table Easel

Palette:

•Plastic : kidney 17well • 9.5 x 13 3/4 in

Daler Stretched Canvases:

2x: 20cmx20cm
3x: 40cmx60cm
1x: 20cmx50cm

Total cost: ~£82


How does this look for a beginner setup? It has everything that the Bob Ross Master Set has, other than a script liner brush. Additionally, I get an easel (cheap, but will have to do for now), more paints and 6 blank canvases.

Is there anything I've forgotten? I'm under the impression that any white spirit or turpentine can be used as a brush cleaner/thinner, so I can grab a bottle of that for free.

Any comments are much appreciated! Thank you again, Colin :thumbsup:

*Edit: I just went for a bog standard cheap plastic palette because there doesn't seem to be a very wide selection at all. I was unable to find anythng that resembles the one that Bob uses, which is massive.

@Angelina - Do you think I'd be better off substitution say, Prussian Blue for the Indian Yellow? Thanks for your comments. Also, I thought the bars of soap were just for hands lol:lol:

Carey Griffel
12-07-2010, 04:02 PM
Not a bad list at all, good price tag, too. :)

One thing struck me to be aware of...a palette with wells can be a pain to clean when it comes to using it with oil paint. Oil paint is thick enough not to need wells, so you might want to consider something flat instead.

And everyone has their own color selections and ideas about colors, you could get bogged down trying to listen to too many suggestions, but I'll still make one. :p I'd switch the prussian with french ultramarine, I'd ditch the van dyke brown (since it's sort of close to umber) and get burnt sienna instead, and instead of the black I'd get another red (medium or orange-leaning).

You don't say much about your brushes, I'd suggest filberts as the most versatile shape.

~!Carey

karrella
12-07-2010, 10:22 PM
I tried a pseudo Bob Ross for my first oil painting. I'm only on number three now but the confidence gained by finishing a painting in a new unfamiliar medium from start to finish was invaluable! It's not really my style or my art taste, but I find it very compelling to watch for some reason too! Good luck on your first, and make sure you share some pictures!

ParadoxLiz
12-07-2010, 10:35 PM
I would drop the 3" brush. Even Bob Ross didn't use one that big. Also, with canvasses that small, you'll find that the larger brushes are more difficult to use. Take Carey's advice and swap the 3" for a filbert.

WFMartin
12-08-2010, 01:42 AM
BoB Ross' methods are based upon formulae and gimmicks. The way he loads his paint on his brushes, the way he skip-trowels his mountains, the way he blends skies, the way he "carves out" cabins in his paint, and then applies them with a knife.

One reason that he makes it look so easy is because it is; however to be that easy, one must use his tools, and materials, rather than substitutes. Much of his operations and applications are based upon his application and consistency of the liquid white, the stiffness of the brushes, the consistency of the paint (such as having his darker, rough-in colors stiffer than his more final, lighter colors). His entire system has been engineered for success.

Once you have had some experience in performing his many fomulaic operations, you can then begin to search for better or cheaper alternatives, but for a beginner, I would recommend that you stick to his tools, and materials.

The Bob Ross method can provide one with almost immediate success, it is true, but once you learn it, the process will not allow you to improve. It is based upon certain gimmicks, and effects, and once learned, the resulting quality remains virtually unchanged from painting to painting. You simply become "better" at doing it. You then find yourself held "captive" by the tools and materials, and their resulting gimmicks, successful as they may be.

The ambitious painter (beginner) quickly begins to realize that this is as good as it's ever going to get when following the Bob Ross method, and then begins searching for other, more gratifying ways to satisfy his need for improvement. It usually takes about 6 to 8 paintings done with the Bob Ross style to become disenchanted with the prospects of improving by remaining with the method.

But, for a beginner to the system, I believe I would recommend that you stick with his materials and tools, in order to get the true "feel" of the method.

AngelinaHolland
12-12-2010, 08:10 AM
Nice set!
I wouldn't substitute phtalo blue for the indian yellow. If you have to choose, get the ind. yellow later on. After some practise, you'll know from experience which colours you'd like to add :)

karenlee
12-12-2010, 12:28 PM
I think you've done a great job of sorting through the options; your list looks good except for the plastic palette. I agree with Carey, you will be happier with a tablet of palette sheets and/or a coated or uncoated board palette. I believe the plastic palettes are for acrylic paint, which allegedly peels off when dry.
Congratulations and have FUN!
-Karen

Crystal1
12-12-2010, 07:13 PM
If you have to, you can use a ceramic or china dish as a palette to begin with. Just make sure to never use that plate for food again. The brushes you're are talking about sound a bit large for such small canvases. I would try to get a brush that is 1/4" for details. These may make it a bit more difficult to paint Bob Ross style, but it shouldn't take you long to figure out how to paint nice picture. Then you may want to try some other styles and you will already have the tools. Happy Painting.

MrBThatsMe
12-14-2010, 05:32 AM
Thanks for the replies :) I've been trying to get online for a few days now but my phone internet keeps giving in on me.

I'll leave the pallet for now and go with the ceramic plate option :0 Thanks for that tip! As for the canvases, I just chose a few different sizes.. no doubt curiousity will get the better of me and I'll eperiment with them. The larger ones will be for the Bob Ross trials though. Although, I think it's cheaper to buy a batch of 10 canvases on Ebay.

The 3" brush I mentioned comes in a pack with the 1" and 2", so the option to swap it for a filbert isn't really an option :p I could buy extra things myself, but like i said this is a christmas present for myself so I just want to get the basics asap.

Still haven't ordered anything due to the outage of my phone internet recently though :envy:

I guess i'd better go fill up my online shopping cart again! :clap:

MrBThatsMe
12-16-2010, 04:56 AM
Right, despite all the indecisiveness and confusion so far, I've decided to approach this from a different angle :lol:
I read a few things about the bristle types and firmness etc, as well as the stiffness of the palette knives and have decided that as my christmas present, I'm just going to get the Bob Ross official tools (2" Background, 2" blender, 1" blender, #6 Fan Brush, Large Knife), a pack of cheap-as-chips value brushes and the same budget table Easel and a tin of Liquid White.

I'll buy the Winton paints myself with any christmas money that I recieve :) I'd feel way too cheeky if I told my parents that I want them to spend a fortune on something that quite frankly, they don't think I'll be interested in after a month or so. It's looking like http://www.artifolk.co.uk are going to be the cheapest for the Bob Ross tools.

I bet you're all sick of me :rolleyes:

Crystal1
12-16-2010, 02:28 PM
Merry Christmas, and happy painting!

Aires
12-16-2010, 08:06 PM
One more cheapy idea that works great: as a palette use a piece of glass from a picture frame, lay it on something solid so it won't break and it makes a cheap and easily cleaned palette. Even better is the glass turntable from a discarded microwave. It is thick, tempered glass with no sharp edges so it makes a perfect palette. The older microwaves sometimes had retangular trays, they give a little more room for mixing paint and have the same attributes. Try one, you'll like the ease of cleaning. Even dried paint can be removed with the edge of your Bob Ross palette knife or a razor blade. A large ceramic tile is sturdy and is as useful as heavy glass.... think creatively and you'll save yourself a lot of money as you learn what works best for you. I have a number of purchased palettes but much prefer glass which I keep in a plastic paint saver box so I can move it around with no danger of it breaking. Snap on a lid and you can even take it on location with you. Happy Painting and Merry Christmas!!!

MrBThatsMe
12-17-2010, 02:48 AM
Thanks for that tip! :) I'll do some hunting around for a decent 'pallette' :)