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soap
12-06-2002, 08:11 AM
Hello everybody,

I have a question on oil pastels. I am a bit curious about them. Can anybody give me some info on them? Are they any good (which brands?) What is the difference in effect with soft pastels? Can you blend with those things? Does anybody know of a good website where I can see examples of what you can do with them?

Thank you!

Soap

Mo.
12-06-2002, 02:26 PM
Hi soap,

I used to paint with oil pastels a long time ago before moving on to oil paints, I still have all my oil pastels, although they are a little dried out now. They are totally different to dry pastels, very messy to use but very enjoyable if frustrating at times. I suppose the main difference between oil pastels and dry pastels is that they are dust free. They are bound by oil or wax. Caran D'ache do a good range.
Comparatively easy to use, but as I said messy, I used to work from light to dark as I found that it was almost impossible to apply a lighter shade over a dark, so I had to really plan out my work. They can be mixed with turps or paint thinner to make glazes and washes or applied really thick impasto style, when applied thickly you can use the end of your brush to make fine marks into the oils for fine details like grass or feathers. You can blend with your fingers, or a cotton bud, tissue or colour shaper.

They are very colour saturated, so you must be careful to keep them clean or you will transfer unwanted colours around your painting. If you make a mistake, just wipe it off with a turpy rag, just like oil paints, although you cannot mix the two, by that, I mean you cannot paint oil over oil pastels as oil pastels never dry out, but you can apply oil pastels to a dry oil painting. You can apply a fixative to your work when finished, and a varnish but I never used varnish.

You can I believe buy individual sticks, so just buy a few basic colours and have a play around with them, use a fairly thick paper, of about a medium texture.
I loved working with oil pastels, and intend to do some work in the new year with them again.
Hope this helps some, if I remember anything else I'll post again, it's been a long time since I used them. :)

sundiver
12-06-2002, 06:57 PM
Soap, if you do a search on WC! there are a number of threads on oil pastels. You should find some useful information there. :)

ohjay
12-06-2002, 07:06 PM
hello soap, figured I'd join in on this as I too am curious about oil pastels...bought a Daler-Rowney set months ago but only tried them once - figured I didn't know how to use them. The result was yucky, to say the least.

use a fairly thick paper, of about a medium texture.

I tried them out on a canson 60 lbs C grain sketch paper
and 90 lbs wc paper, neither felt comfortable to me - how are those papers compared to what one "should use"? Also tried to blend with my fingers, but ended up with "burns" so I quit. And blending with a paper was pretty hard (compared to blending pencil at least).

Not saying this to try to ruin your motivation soap, just thought I'd add a few questions to your thread and see if anyone's got some tips. Figured we could learn these things together...I'm pretty sure my problem is with me, not the oil pastels :)

Koert
12-07-2002, 06:28 AM
i don't like the caran d'ache oil pastels
i think they're to hard
when i use oil pastels, i use "panda"
they're cheap, have only a very limited amount of colours, and i don't know how lightfast they are
but i love working with them

CarlyHardy
12-07-2002, 07:16 PM
If oil pastels never dry, does that mean they have to be framed under glass? Does that mean you wouldn't want to paint on canvas with them?

How come they never dry? Maybe this is a dumb question!!
carly

Mo.
12-08-2002, 10:49 AM
Originally posted by CHClements
If oil pastels never dry, does that mean they have to be framed under glass? Does that mean you wouldn't want to paint on canvas with them?

How come they never dry? Maybe this is a dumb question!!
carly

Hi Carly,

Not dumb at all, oil pastels contain wax and oil, but not linseed oil as used in oil paints, I think it's a type of mineral oil, it's so long since I used these. So the oil will eventually dry out, but the wax won't, which leaves the surface of the painting still workable.

Two of my paintings are hanging in my friends home, they are about 15 years old and still as fresh as the day I painted them, they were not fixed, but were framed under glass, using spacers as with dry pastels, they can be framed without glass, but a fixative should be used to protect the surface from dust.

The beauty of oil pastels is that you can paint on virtual anything with them, canvas, pastel paper, watercolour paper, board, etc.,
but if using a thin paper, it would be wise to prepare the surface first as the thin paper will absorb the oil from the pastel, I used to use cansons pastel paper.