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jazzm
04-10-2000, 07:03 PM
I'd like to hear some responses to this painting...It was from a plein air session a few weeks ago and I got a little carried away! It's acrylics on canvas board..16"x12"
I use maimeri acrylics.....also sometimes Winsor& Newton......I find oils inconvenient as the climate here in Ireland is so wet and unpredictable....Jazzm
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/User/Surreal_Stream.jpg

jazzm
04-10-2000, 07:10 PM
By the way I forgot to mention the title of this piece is "Surreal Stream"...Jazzm

tgault
04-10-2000, 08:39 PM
Jazz,
I really like this painting. Something about it immediately reminded me of Edvard Munch. I wasn't sure exactly what... it was more the feel than the style. So I did a little looking, mostly because I didn't want to be embarrassed by bringing up the comparison http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif, and came up with <a href="http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/art/19th/munch/munch_adameve.jpg" target="_blank">this piece</a> which I think does have style similarities.

[This message has been edited by tgault (edited April 10, 2000).]

LarrySeiler
04-11-2000, 03:10 PM
Hey Jazzm!!!!

Definitely! When "tgault" put the Munch image up for comparison..it is amazing the similarities.

Only suggestion I'd make here is to aim to work for a more "assymetrical" picture balance rather than symmetrical. Symmetry is the obvious solution, and in the art world becomes by such..trite or boring. Also referred to as formal balance. On the other hand, working to arrange an "assymetrical" balance still arrives at a balance, but at first glance seems to be it shouldn't work. Visually that creates more tension and interest, and holds the eye!

For example....seeing two people of equal mass and weight on a teeter totter balancing is no great feat. Its common place and would not catch an eye of a passerby. (formal or symmetrical balance).

On the other hand...place a 350-400 pound guy on the teeter totter and a 65 pound kid on the other end, and it will catch an eye. The bigger guy has to scoot up closer to center in order for it to happen, but it does in the end balance and provides interest. (informal or assymetrical balance).

take care!

Larry

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"Art attacks can skill!"

sandyartist
04-11-2000, 06:09 PM
Jazzm..Larry is ssooo right about the symmetry issue..at present, the center of interest is smack dab in the middle of the image///a little off-center creates more of a dynamic, more interesting..have you heard of the "golden mean"..old idea that still works, compositionally...if a canvas is divided into fourths..horizontally..the center of interest should be in one of the two inner sections...left, or right of the center...that is what is most pleasing to the human eye...still works for the most part. I really like the feeling of this painting..color and expression..the comparison to the Munch painting is absolutely eerie......not bad company, however......congrats!! S.

jazzm
04-11-2000, 06:41 PM
Thanks for that guys...you are dead right about the symmetry thing...I live and learn....I wouldn't mind I bought the book "Composition in Art" by Henry Rankin Poore. I should read it! especially chapter 1...The importance of Balance!
I must say pardon my ignorance I never heard of Munch but its nice to be in with that class of company..thanks again



[This message has been edited by jazzm (edited April 28, 2000).]

bobsart
04-11-2000, 06:50 PM
I like pieces that have depth. I like to be drawn into the work. You did it.

I would expect to see more green in your Irish landscape. Have you done anything along the rocky coastline? You know, a powerful wave glazed with a frothy foam crashing and pounding, unmercifully, the rocky coast with a hint of emerald green glinting off the distant cliffs? How fortunate you are to have that environment.

bob

Sandi
04-12-2000, 12:49 AM
Wow Jazz, this is so wonderfully expressive! Love your brushwork, colors, mood, contrasts, subject and everything.
It's an easy one to crop towards assymentry also. Looking forward to seeing more of your works. I agree with the Edvard Munch similarities, too. Uncanny.

jazzm
04-16-2000, 02:33 PM
Thanks for your comments Bob and Sandi. Its nice to get some feedback.I'm glad you liked the piece....Jazzm. Bobsart, there is a lot of Irish landscape on the way(green) and when I was doing this piece I was experimenting with an impressionist style and really enjoyed it even though I was caught in a couple of heavy rainshowers! overall it took me 2 hours approx. Thanks again

jazzm
04-16-2000, 02:50 PM
Here is the cropped version. I feel it is much improved compositionally, any comments?....Jazzm


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/User/surreal2.JPG

Allaprima
04-27-2000, 12:58 AM
This landscape really drew me in, it has a powerful emotional presents, The woods and stream seems very much alive and have a somewhat ominous feeling. Very moving !its almost like a scene from a novel
What I love about art is its ability to move and stir emotion and Im envious of musicians and writers sometimes because there mediums seem to be more emotionally direct,, do you know what I mean? Anyway, great job.

mark71565
04-27-2000, 06:00 AM
Nice piece of work.

PS:Munch was the artist who painted The Scream.


Mark

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Humans are visual creatures... I just give them something to look at.
~Mark Ventimiglia

jazzm
04-28-2000, 02:55 PM
Thanks Allaprima I know exactly what you mean.. Mark I read up about Herr Munch since! Isn't this site just the most educational!......thanks Jazz

cagathoc
04-28-2000, 04:30 PM
Much better! now it's DYNAMIC.


cindy