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Jamie4
10-09-2010, 02:19 PM
Hi: I have a few paintings that I really like and people have been interested in buying them. However, before selling them, I would like to make a copy or a few good copies or perhaps note cards out of them. Where do you start to do this. I have called the local copy shops here and will stop in to talk directly to them, but this does not sound like the place. I really don't know what I am talking about here!!! Appreciate any information.

If this is not the place to ask, please put it where it belongs.... Jane/Jamie4

virgil carter
10-09-2010, 02:30 PM
You have several options for reproductions.

If you want to make individual prints, the two most common printing processes are 4-color reproduction and giclee prints. Information on both is available on line. 4-color is only economical for a high count printing run. Giclees are more economical, but most printers ask for a one-time, initial set-up fee.

For cards, you have a couple of choices in addition to the above. You can investigate some of the on-line printers that specialize in business and greeting cards. They do a good, professional job, and can provide envelopes if you want. Another option I use for personal Christmas cards is to take a 15 X 11 original (or thereabout; it's best to have a large original and reduce the image to obtain the card) to a local copy shop and have them copy onto card stock. The reproduction is excellent, inexpensive and quick.

Good luck.

Virgil

Yorky
10-09-2010, 03:34 PM
I have always printed my own, but I recently found that they can be commercially printed at reasonable cost. I used Overnight Prints (http://www.overnightprints.co.uk/products) but I am sure you have similar firms in the US.

Doug

Jamie4
10-09-2010, 03:38 PM
Hi Virgil: Thanks for your help on this. I just checked out your site and love your paintings--wow, they are all beautiful and fun.
Now since I have found you, may I ask what is your favorite red, yellow and blue, basic colors I know, but your colors are all so bright and clear, what I always look for in paintings--any advice. Thanks again. Jane

virgil carter
10-09-2010, 05:39 PM
Hi Jane! Thanks for your comments. Colors are just like people--there are so many and so different!

I tinker with my palette every 6-12 months, but typically use the following primary colors: primary yellow: Hansa PY97; supplementary yellow: Gamboge P&3 & PY42; Secondary red-orange: Cad Scarlet PR108; primary magenta: Quin. Rose PV19; secondary blue-violet: Ultramarine Blue PB29; primary cyan: Phthalo Blue GS PS 15:3; secondary blue green: Phthalo Green BS PG7.

I also have some personal favorites that I keep on my palette, including, among others: Naples Yellow PY35+PY43; Manganese blue PB33 and Andrew's Turqoise PB36+PG7+PW6.

I've used Cheap Joes American Journey and Davinci paints for over 20 years for my studio paints because I like the economy of the 37 ml tubes. When I travel, and use 15 ml tubes to save space and weight, I use paints from many manufacturers.

Good luck. Sling paint!

Virgil

Studio-1-F
10-10-2010, 12:14 PM
However, before selling them, I would like to make a copy or a few good copies or perhaps note cards out of them. Where do you start to do this.
Step 1: Get a REAL good digital scan of your artwork. You'll use this later to make the cards and whatever else you want to put the image on, such as a giclee print or a poster. If you are near Omaha, there is a place called Photographics Imaging that can do that for you: http://photographicsatthehotshops.com/

I am sure there are other, similar kinds of scanning places in town, so check your yellow pages.

Step 2: Find a place that will make the cards. Here you can use online outfits or locals. But the key is that you are able to send them a copy of that super quality scanned image that you had made before you sold your original. :thumbsup:

Hope this helps!

Jan

gmarie
10-11-2010, 01:31 AM
I make sure I've got a really good digital photo. Sometimes for me this means taking many shots, angles & lighting, to choose what's most exact, and I make sure I've got a really good one before letting go of my original.

For me, in making cards, what looks most exactly like my painting, is when I print out on Ultra Premium Photo Paper Glossy.

All this, of course, is speaking strictly "homemade". :)

I print info on the back (bottom) first, then run it through opposite and print the photo, then crease in the middle, and, I add an insert, often parchment.

wabbitt
10-17-2010, 07:35 PM
Step 1: Get a REAL good digital scan of your artwork. You'll use this later to make the cards and whatever else you want to put the image on, such as a giclee print or a poster.

I have my scanner set at 72 dpi to display my art online, really low resolution, but I can get color to match very closely with little to no photoshop tweaking. What resolution do you suggest is good enough for giclee reproduction?

There's a local watercolor artist whom I asked...she uses Costco to print the notecards she sells at the local Farmer's Market.

virgil carter
10-17-2010, 10:34 PM
For high quality print reproduction a minimum of 300 dpi is required by almost every printing and media source. If you don't have a camera that shoots at that resolution, you can always use software, such as GIMP, to change the resolution to 300 dpi.

Then there is the iissue of the minimum size of the file necessary for the size of the desired final print. I don't know the formula for this, but for cards 4 X 6 or 5 X 7 my files typically are 1-3 Mb and seem to work out fine. Bigger prints need bigger files. I'm sure someone here knows what the formual is.

Sling paint!

Virgil

ErnstG
10-18-2010, 06:43 AM
For high quality print reproduction a minimum of 300 dpi is required by almost every printing and media source. If you don't have a camera that shoots at that resolution, you can always use software, such as GIMP, to change the resolution to 300 dpi.

G > Hallo Virgil,
300 dpi ist Minimum für einen guten Druck -
beim Scannen oder Fotografieren beachten.
Die Dateigröße ergibt sich aus der Bildgröße.
Immer genaue Größe verwenden.
Speichern nach Bild-Bearbeitung als JEPG.
Beste Qualität mit Laserdrucker. Tinte bleicht aus!!!
Ich drucke und konfektioniere selbst!

E > Hi Virgil,
300 dpi minimum for a good pressure -
when scanning photographs or note.
The file size is determined by the image size.
Always use the exact size.
Save for image processing as JEPG.
Top quality laser printer. Ink fades out!!!
I print and assemble yourself!

Gruß/Greetings Ernst

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/18-Oct-2010/233001-Klappkarten.jpg

virgil carter
10-18-2010, 11:02 AM
Hi Ernst! Your cards are beautiful! Your paintings reduce well to cards and maintain the same color and clarity of your full-size originals. You are an amazing artist!

I am unsure of your meaning when you say "always use the exact size".

For those following the thread, the analogy in photography is that the quality of the print is always best when you have a large negative and make a small print, rather than vice versa. Similarly, I have always assumed the best electronic reproduction is when your original file size exceeds the minimum size needed for a particular size print. Yes, no? I wish I knew a reference for the miminum size files for 300 dpi reproduction of say, 4X6, 5X7, etc. I know there must be a table or chart somewhere. I'll try to Google it.

Sling paint!

Virgil

Jamie4
10-18-2010, 01:08 PM
Thanks everyone for all the good advice. Keep talking as the more I hear the better it gets. I am still trying to figure out how to do the 300 dpi on the computer, camera, etc. And just called a local store to see what they could do and am going to check Costco also--thanks Wabbit.

GMarie: Do you use a certain size of glossy paper or is it a card-sounds more like paper size to me?? Thanks for your help

Ernst, your cards are truly beautiful and the color gorgeous.
Thanks Virgil for all your help in this.

ErnstG
10-18-2010, 02:28 PM
I am unsure of your meaning when you say "always use the exact size".

For those following the thread, the analogy in photography is that the quality of the print is always best when you have a large negative and make a small print, rather than vice versa. Similarly, I have always assumed the best electronic reproduction is when your original file size exceeds the minimum size needed for a particular size print. Yes, no? I wish I knew a reference for the miminum size files for 300 dpi reproduction of say, 4X6, 5X7, etc.

G > Hallo Vergil,
meine Bilder sind 10x7cm groß = die Auflösung ist 300 dpi = 2,9 MB (TIFF)!
Vorsicht: Starke Vergrößerung oder Verkleinerung macht das Bild wieder unscharf.
Immer Originalgröße (exakte Größe) in Photoshop oder GIMP oder Paintshop oder... erstellen.

E > Hi Virgil,
my pictures are large 10x7cm = the resolution is 300 dpi = 2,9 MB (TIFF)!
Caution: Strong enlargement or reduction makes the picture blurry again.
Always use original size (exact size) in Photoshop or GIMP or Paintshop or ... create.

Gruß/Greetings Ernst

virgil carter
10-18-2010, 05:42 PM
Thanks, Ernst. Now I see your meaning, and that you are referring to TIFF files, rather than JPG files.

My personal experience in digital printing is very limited. Digital photography I know a bit more about (no pun intended).

I guess for anyone following this thread, with an interest in having their paintings made into cards, there are several choices: 1) have someone else do it all; 2) you do it all; 3) or a combination, where someone photographs/scans the painting to produce the digital file, and someone else makes the finished prints or cards from the digital file. All of these will work.

Good luck!

Virgil

dpcoffin
10-18-2010, 07:30 PM
I've been printing cards from my wife's paintings for years, using a bottom of the line Epson inkjet (currently we have—and love—a Stylus C88 (http://www.amazon.com/Epson-Stylus-C88-Printer-C11C617121/dp/B000FSOZE4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=office-products&qid=1287440555&sr=8-1-spell)) and Strathmore's 10x7 Gloss Inkjet Cards (http://www.dickblick.com/products/strathmore-digital-photo-cards/?wmcp=google&wmcid=products&wmckw=11915-1017). I use Photoshop to prepare the image, which comes from a DSLR camera shooting in Raw format, then lay out the card and print in Illustrator, just dragging the Photoshop file into the card file open in Illustrator and adjusting it to fit the space, but any page-layout program would work as well, even Photoshop (or Photoshop Elements) itself.

The C88 is SO much better than earlier generations of inkjets. The inks don't dry out in the printer when not used for a week or more, and we can get several hundred cards from a batch of of inks; I only use Epson inks just to make sure there are as few problems as possible.

dpc

Surfinia
10-19-2010, 11:35 AM
I will add a little to all the excellent advice.

I use a HP Photosmart D5460. The ink is NOT archival. BUT, for cards, it's fine (store-bought cards are not all that lightfast either). Since inkjet inks are not waterproof, I spray the dried cards with fixative, which sets the ink and makes it a bit more durable.

While glossy photopaper DOES make for the best print, I have found that "Presentation Paper" is a good second-best as far as print and color quality.

I have a scanner, so I create my own artwork images (always in TIF). I typically scan original artwork at 400dpi. But images reduced for cards will be 200dpi as I haven't seen any difference in the smaller printed images.

I used to fret a lot over matching colors to the original. It's really hard to do with my equipment, and now I just make the card look as good as it can. I realized that even with commercially produced cards the image doesn't match the original exactly. The purchaser (or the one receiving the card) doesn't know the difference. They like it for what it is (not what it could be).

Carole A
10-23-2010, 12:26 AM
I recently printed up a supply of notecards from some of my photographs. I used Microsoft Publisher to lay them out, two to a sheet of 8.5 x 11 paper. I brought my own paper, which had a texture similar to canvas, to a copy center and printed them up. The copy center cut the sheets into two for me after printing. I purchased matching envelopes and plastic presentation sleeves and figured my costs to be about 61 cents each. I sold them at art fairs for $3 each and at another show where I had to pay a commission for $3.50 each. It was my first experience and I learned a lot and had fun doing it. I have quite a supply left over that I will give for gifts and use for my own correspondence.

I hope this year to have a painting that I will like well enough to use for a Christmas card.

Carole