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View Full Version : Winter Sunset in Alaska / Watercolor


colburn
02-19-2000, 02:01 AM
It needs help, I am lost as what to do next.
Any takers?
Kim


http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/User/sunset.jpg

henrik
02-19-2000, 09:52 AM
Good job.
One thing that strikes me is that the trees close to the viewer are all in shadow, the ground is also in shadow. Considering the position of the sun there ought to be some lightning (backlight) on the trees, some cast shadows (long and soft since the sun is low and not so strong).

colburn
02-19-2000, 11:57 AM
Ok Henrik, how is this? I added some very soft shadows but it still seems to be lacking something.
Kim

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/User/sunset2.jpg

henrik
02-19-2000, 02:01 PM
Hm - are the trees in shadow or not? If not then there should be some rim-light on them, and perhaps some light shining true.

If however the trees are in shadow - then the position of the sun seems wrong.

Sorry - the yellow round thing may be something else - is it the moon? Where is the light coming from?

[This message has been edited by henrik (edited February 19, 2000).]

kayemme
02-19-2000, 05:03 PM
i think what you may be finding difficult is your use of color. the colors are beautiful, and the rgb of monitors does distort it a bit, but you might find that by using complimentive colors can make your strong points stronger.
what time of day is it?
there is a sun (?) about midway up the page to the left, and if that were so, then your contrast would probably be a little higher and your colors would be a little more intense. my guess is that this is around 4pm(this season) where the sun is about to make it's final drop to evening and the colors at pre-sunset are usually much more intense than you think to mix on your palette.
sometimes some of the cadmiums straight from the tube will give the effect needed.
i would extend the sun's color a bit and throw some golds and oranges in the sky to compliment the blues and violets you have in the snow.
good luck to you

------------------
km (http://www.artistnation.com/members/lofts/kmarion/)

kemshmi
02-19-2000, 05:11 PM
I suggest washing out the dark line at the base of your most distant mountains to push them further away..and finishing out the area on the right..

watercolor tip: you can use a brush with plain clear water and paper towel or tissue to remove some paint..or to remove more paint you can use a soft sponge..how much you can scrub depends on the quality of your paper

nice work, keep painting http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif
kemshmi

bruin70
02-19-2000, 10:26 PM
how did i miss the sun.....in that case, i don't see how the foreground can be in light. in fact ,,,we are on the shadow side of ALL the mountains. the trees cannot be in shadow... they must be backlit, AND cast a shadow. this unusual sun positioning means you should use your warms and cools to show what the sun is hitting and what it is not. from what i see, everything from midground to fore should be in light. the only things in shadow are the mountains....milt

colburn
02-19-2000, 10:40 PM
This is the picture that I am trying to paint, the sun is almost non existant.

colburn
02-19-2000, 10:40 PM
This is the picture that I am trying to paint, the sun is almost non existant.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/User/sunsetpic.jpg

kayemme
02-20-2000, 12:30 AM
well, then, that's the MOON! i was confused, thinking it was the sun!
this makes it completely different.
i'd work wet-in wet on this one, and just go to town with a big fat brush and at the end, when it's ALMOST dry, go in for the trees.
watercolor is really pretty amazing. you can really layer it after it has dried and get the most beautiful colors. try blocking in general shapes and working from there. there's very little white in this photo, so you don't have to spare much in your white whites.
good luck!

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km (http://www.artistnation.com/members/lofts/kmarion/)

bruin70
02-20-2000, 12:35 AM
c,,if the mountains are under snow, then i suggest you blue the sky. that the sky is almost white , takes away from the white of the snow. if you blue the sky then you can make the mountain tops clean white. as you have it now , you shaded the tops of the mountains because you were faced with readability problem. the mountains were white, the sky was white, so the mountains didn't read,,,so you outlined them to make them read properly. trees (anything)in shadow casts no shadow,,,except for a vague-ish greying on the ground from reflected light all around the enviroment. at most i feel you should simply make the tree edges less sharp. everything in art is relative.....milt

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"he who thinks he know all and knows nothing is king in a kingdom of one,,,,,or a critic" - the kobe

[This message has been edited by bruin70 (edited February 19, 2000).]

colburn
02-20-2000, 01:04 AM
LOL, well duh! why didn't I think of that as the moon. My mistake,I thought maybe it was the distant sun going down, that is why I tried to get the yellow in there. OK that puts it in a totally different perspective. Boy do I have alot to learn. Thank You!
Kim

Bruce Rohrlach
02-20-2000, 01:23 AM
--- which now means - the lighting on the mountains is correct because the sun is behind you (i.e. opposite part of the sky to the "full moon"), and there is a big mountain behind you casting a shadow. No longer need shadows on the pine trees.

The question is - how do we convey to the viewer that it is the moon we see ?? (maybe by reddening the low horizon sky to give the impression of a sunset (as in original pic!).
Nature never lies. Like the way you impart your own colour scheme (and feel) to this one cf to the photo (makes a big improvement on the original photo/image !!)

henrik
02-20-2000, 03:16 AM
For starters - make your moon white http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

If you look closely to the trees in the photo you see that there is light (very low key) on the trees. Although it is hard to deduce where the sun is, the light on the trees places it behind the viewer and to the right (4-5 o'clock).

henrik
02-20-2000, 10:31 AM
Kim, (just a friendly warning)... I hope you know that you are doing a copyright infringement by copying and using someone elses photo (it looks like it is from a magazine) - I did the same once and now I can't find the photographer to obtain a permission (sigh). Check out the forum http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/Forum25/HTML/000015.html if you want to read more about copyright.

kemshmi
02-20-2000, 01:22 PM
why not take the painting from where it is..as being with the sun??..and not go as dark as the photo!..that would be to much!just try to use some of the suggestions above re: the painting with the sunlight http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif
(you can probably put the photo away at this point and finish out the painting)

kemshmi

kayemme
02-21-2000, 12:47 AM
i thought it was only copyright infringement if you sold the piece or displayed it as your own. for study work, it shouldn't be a big deal. for your benefit, though it may be a good idea to title it "after [such & such]" after your title just for protection later, in the event you become a big art star. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif


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km (http://www.artistnation.com/members/lofts/kmarion/)

bruin70
02-21-2000, 02:06 AM
bruce,,,,,,you darken the sky,,,,and everthing else. it'll also be a good idea to enlarge the moon,,,which it tends to be anyway. that shouldalso be enought not to worry about copyrights


[This message has been edited by bruin70 (edited February 21, 2000).]

bruin70
02-21-2000, 02:09 AM
henrik,,,,,nothing to worry about. there's nothing in the painting that vaguely resembles the photo.

henrik
02-21-2000, 03:05 AM
Sorry taking up copyright again - but do read the info in the thread about copyright. I don't think you are in much trouble here - but if you change this painting to look more like the photo you risk ending up with a derivative.

irene clark
02-21-2000, 11:34 AM
Hi Kim,
I like the 2nd much better than the photo.
That surprises me because I'm just crazy for sunsets and sunrises. I love the feeling of solitude your piece invokes. I also get a feeling there's a brooding mountain behind me casting a shadow in the foreground,adding to the isolation. Also the whiteout misty area, mid rightside seems to me like the toes of an approaching avalanche or at least an approaching snow squall. Ya! that's it, the shadows in the foreground are caused by storm clouds.Am I reading any of this right? It doesn't really matter as long as you the artist can invoke strong feelings in the viewer, concerning your creation, you're definitely on the right track.This piece feels very far away and lonely.
You're doing really well if you give rise to strong emotions. Keep em coming.
sincerely,
Irene Clark with a heart for art.

<a href="http://www.finearts.yorku.ca/kclark/hart/">Heart to H-ART - Irene Clark</a>




[This message has been edited by irene clark (edited February 21, 2000).]

colburn
02-27-2000, 02:38 AM
Hi Everyone,
I haven't had a chance till now to tell you all thank you. I decided to leave the pic pretty much as you last see it, and start on another. Same basic idea but I think I will use more colors this time. It is now time for painting http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/redface.gif)

Henrik, I read the copyright info, thank you. I will keep all of it in mind when using photos and try to just use the basic ideas, and create an original.

I will have another for critique soon....until then......HAPPY PAINTING!
Kim