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Bruce Rohrlach
01-21-2000, 08:13 PM
Hi,
Was wondering if I could get some feedback on this - it's an acrylic (75 x 50 cm) painted from a photograph (6 nights work). The scene is north of Cloncurry in NW Queensland (Australia) near Gregory Downs. The striking colours are real believe-it-or-not (although the redness of the soil is only very slightly over-accentuated by this photo - in the painting it is slightly more orange coloured. The light is very harsh here - typical of the outback (and it's mid-day).
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/User/GulfCountry.jpg

Gisela
01-21-2000, 09:36 PM
Very striking painting, indeed. The colors especially. I'd sure like to there on a painting expedition!
Gisela

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http://www.artistnation.com/members/paris/gisela

irene clark
01-22-2000, 01:52 PM
Hi Bruce, or should I say, Gday Mate,
Talk about unique paintings. This one surely is that. Marvelous colours in the sky, and that red, man that beautiful red soil makes for a truely wonderful contrast.
I just love paintings of far out of the away places in nature. How fortunate you are to have access to such a magnificent landscape.
I have the feeling there are many many more to inspire the fine artist in you. Keep them coming. I for one love Australian landscapes.
Sincerely
Irene Clark with a heart for art.

llis
01-22-2000, 02:19 PM
Wonderful painting! I like the road in the backgroud and the furrows leading to the road. Keeps the eye moving. Maybe the trees in the background need to lean toward a deeper blue green or purple to make them sink deeper into the background. Or a least the lower half of the trees need shadows of a deeper color. The values on the trees in the background are the same as the trees in the foreground. This is just a minor observation and the painting is wonderful just as it is. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

bruin70
01-29-2000, 10:06 AM
musta missed this one.....once again, you display uniqueness, whether in execution or choice of imagery.....AND, once again, i think your composition is holding you back. your style is unique enough to warrant something more visionary in compositional style.
i see this as a 180 degree panorama. if 50cm high, then 200-250cm long.
japanese prints leaps to mind again....milt

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"he who thinks he know all and knows nothing is king in a kingdom of one,,,,,or a critic" - the kobe

[This message has been edited by bruin70 (edited January 29, 2000).]

CarlyHardy
02-01-2000, 04:15 PM
Love the strong use of color and the intensity...the only things I would have done differently would be to make the background trees warmer..perhaps a purple cast to them and warm up and tone down the middle ground..it seems to bright across the center of the painting. The other thing that I can't figure out is the black tree like figures beside the tree on the left..if shadows, they need to lie down on the ground. If not then why so black..this could just be the computer translation too. Your use of color is dynamic! Capture some of that daring in your composition! I like the piece very much! carlyne

Phyllis Rennie
02-01-2000, 09:49 PM
Your style is very dynamic! I agree that more width might make the composition more exciting. How about turning it into a diptich or triptich? (not sure if I spelled that correctly) It's a painting made up of 2 or 3 individual panels, each one a complete painting in itself but still part of the whole.

Bruce Rohrlach
02-01-2000, 10:06 PM
Yes Bruin and Phyllis - I tried pasting 2 and 3 together side-by-side in Paintshop and it does work well. Really expands the layout nicely. I have always thought Phyllis that one day I would try a "diptich" (is that what it's called ??!!) as I have been intrigued by the idea in the past. Your've given me the impetus to think about another scene for that approach http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Carlyne - your right - some tonal variation in the yellow grassy mid-ground would be better! I made the tree shadows very dark because I wanted to convey the harshness of the sunlight - even tho I know shadows lighten up the further the subject which casts the shadow is situated. I think I remember reading that shadows should have a hint of colour related to the object that throws the shadow ? ----- Bruce