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prismalos
09-30-2010, 12:04 PM
Hi, everyone! I started to just go ahead and make the first version of one of the ideas I have for a novel. I want to draw them out instead of writing them. I started the first stage unconsciously, then I saw it turned out to be good, then I created the borders I loved doing when I was in 6th grade.

So to me, it's kind of a continuation of what I dropped off when I was a kid. All the influences in those hours of DnD (Dungeons & Dragons) as well as life experiences are mirrored in this work. My wife occassionally gives ideas too :cool:.

Anyway, I've actually intended to color it, thus using watercolour paper (A4). I instinctively put lines as shadows, now I don't know if I still want to color it. Let me know what you think for the colors? Would it be best to select drawing paper and go on with the B&W pen theme instead or full watercolour it and tune down the lines? I'll try to make to pages of each to see the difference, though.

Titles, some dialogues and other names are still in the slow works, but it's fun to have some ideas popping up on an unexpected moment which makes it spontaneous at times. :)

Now on page 3. I'm putting on the bum icon as it may have (sometime in the near future) some violence and nudity on some parts.

Progress can also be found at http://the29thdimension.blogspot.com/
and update like a weekly journal/comic.

Please move the thread in case not appropriate here. Thanks for looking! :wave:

robertsloan2
09-30-2010, 05:03 PM
This is great! Excellent conflict right on the first page, plenty of suspense, intensity, great layout, distinctive style - I'm following it on your blog and look forward to following it here too. Hope this doesn't get moved!

Why not create it in pen but keep it on the watercolor paper so that your options are open? One possibility is to just keep it on the blog and use ads on your blog once you have about 30 pages up - that's a free form of online self publishing that would leave open the possibility of color. However, if you self publish in print form or sell it as a print book it costs a lot less to have black and white interior pages.

So definitely have the black and white stages reproduced well before coloring any of the pages. Or use regular paper to create them and print them onto watercolor paper for color versions. There are a lot of ways to deal with production issues that leave both versions open!

JTMB
09-30-2010, 07:11 PM
Very creative, Raymond! Figures are still a challenge for me, so this is definitely not something I could consider doing at this point anyway. Good luck with the project.

DrDebby
09-30-2010, 10:28 PM
This is so cool!

birdhs
09-30-2010, 10:49 PM
Distinctive look (to me) and having just published an illustrated book on Kindle and e-pub, we did all illustrations in Pen & Ink, later printing them on heavier paper and watercolored them for use later.
Kindle did not use color, and some of the e-pubs did and some didn't.....
We even toyed with the idea of selling the P&I's as a coloring book....:crossfingers:

Good work so far & I'll drop into your blog tomorrow to see what's there.:thumbsup:

vhere
10-01-2010, 05:53 AM
I think it works well as it is and agree with the idea of having 2 options.

I did a book of my work with Blurb and can highly recommend the quality if you think of self publishing - or even having some done to show publishers

virgo68
10-01-2010, 09:04 PM
Raymond - WOW! I like it left black and white but you have some other great advice and ideas from the others already. I don't know about this sort of thing but I wonder if you can digitally colour some and keep your original work as it is? Anyhow, liking the work - very effective how you've seperated the boxes rather than plain lines :) Will keep watching for the next installment!

Beautiful_Butterflies_Studio
10-01-2010, 09:32 PM
Ummmmm WOW, these are INCREDIBLE!!!!!

You definetly have a unique style, one that really appeals to me!!!!

I agree, try both ways to see which you prefer!!!!

Gentle Hugs, Stacey

prismalos
10-03-2010, 04:53 AM
Thanks, Robert, John, Debby, Stacey, Jackie, birdhs, vhere! Thank you for the kind words and suggestions! Also asked a few people and still the B&W pen still gets the best feedback. :)

I included some notes on the way. like Jackie, it's a good trick to lay down the plans :D Sometimes I just have all these ideas at once and mindlessly laying them down on scratch paper or anywhere just helps preserve the idea. :)

It's both a learning experience to me and something I'd also like to put on my profile for future reference as I am always open to the possibility of doing something I really love for a living. That would be the day. :D

I'm going for the publishing options when I complete at least maybe the first chapter. I'm still on beta at the moment but having fun while still reading up more, really digging Andrew Loomis' books! :clap: Just wish I had all day to draw and practice.

I also find lots of inspiration from looking at your journals. Again, thank you, thank you!

denyalle
10-03-2010, 01:48 PM
This looks really cool! Nice work, I've always enjoyed reading graphic novels so it'll be fun watching one in the making. :)

GhettoDaveyHavok
10-03-2010, 02:46 PM
Really awesome! I'll keep an eye on your thread for sure ;)

robertsloan2
10-03-2010, 04:52 PM
These new pages are great! I love the costumes and the story, it's engaging from the beginning. Very cool layout for the page you haven't captioned yet. I like the color sketch but I'm starting to lean toward black and white pages with maybe a color cover and possibly some color spreads in the middle.

eyepaint
10-03-2010, 08:26 PM
I particularly enjoy the page layout as in your first post where the panels have jagged borders and the space between the panels is darker. :) :) :)

DrDebby
10-03-2010, 09:13 PM
Awesome watching a graphic novel come together. Your notes and preliminary stuff is great information.

rmcbuckeye
10-03-2010, 09:30 PM
So fascinating. Love your creativity! I honestly really like the "ripped" edges of the boxes where the drawings go in.