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Crias
03-22-2001, 07:12 PM
Here is the scratchboard done after the first set of wolves. I think the texture and detail of fur is better in this one, but the scan is worse!

[IMG]http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Mar-2001/watching.jpg[/IMG

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Cathy Sheeter
Sheeter Zoo Crew Animal Art
www.geocities.com/sheeter_zoo_crew/

Crias
03-22-2001, 07:13 PM
Oops... there we go!

<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/22-Mar-2001/watching.jpg" border=0>

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Cathy Sheeter
Sheeter Zoo Crew Animal Art
www.geocities.com/sheeter_zoo_crew/

Mayet Ankh
03-23-2001, 04:56 AM
Hi Cathy,
I don't know much about scraper board, never having used it but I love the way you have done this. Very sensitive rendering of the fur http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

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Mayet

Barbara
03-23-2001, 04:12 PM
Cathy:
What can you tell me about scratchboard? I know nothing. Or is there someplace you can direct me to learn more about it? I have seen it before but never done it or even talked to anyone about how its done. I have a couple photos of my cat that would be PUURRRfect for this! But dont know if I could jump right in and tackle something like that or not.
Love this wolf !
Barb

dduchene
03-23-2001, 08:05 PM
Very cool cathy..I love the textures in the coat. has a drypoint etching quality to it.

Darrell

GC
03-23-2001, 09:53 PM
This is really nice.
I would love to see progress photos of some scratch board work.
I have been intrigued, but don't have a glue how it works.

Ginette

tammy
03-24-2001, 12:13 AM
Yes you did very well on the fur. I sometimes well most of the time, I have a hard time with it. I just did my cat. Now that was fun!

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Don't worry, its gonna be all right....
Tammy's Home for Artists (http://tammy.artistnation.com)

Crias
03-24-2001, 12:37 AM
Originally posted by Barbara:
Cathy:
What can you tell me about scratchboard? I know nothing. Or is there someplace you can direct me to learn more about it? I have seen it before but never done it or even talked to anyone about how its done. I have a couple photos of my cat that would be PUURRRfect for this! But dont know if I could jump right in and tackle something like that or not.
Love this wolf !
Barb

Scratchboard is almost the equivelent of reverse ink...the medium is black on top and you scratch through with an exacto or sharp edge and it is white underneath. I did my first scratchboard in highschool and I am pretty sure that my art teacher made his own scratchbaord with an airbrush, as it is much thinner than the commercial scratchboard that I bought and did not "chunk off." I had a hard time finding it for a while, but just found it available at Dick Blick and ordered some.
<a href="http://www.dickblick.com/categories/scratchboardart/
">Scratchboard from Dick Blick</a>
I also discovered that there are different grades of scratchboard from classroom to clayboard. I recently ordered some sheets of the classroom quality. This stuff is much more the thickness of what I used in school...though I have not tried it out yet to see how it works compared to the other stuff I had. I am currently too cheap to get any of the more expensive grades since I am not trying to sell my work.

The process of scratchboard really is like reverse ink...you take out wherever it should be white. You could use hatching/cross-hatching or poitellism (sp?) or a combination. When I ordered this scratchboard from Dick Blick I also discovered that there are actual tools designed for scratchbaord...I've done all of mine with plain-old exacto, with one blade. I use the back side of the blade not the cutting side. Heavy pressure for thick lines, lighter pressure for thin lines. I do find that my fingers get sore after a while. The snow in both wolf pictures was done by using the flat edge of the exacto and brushing it across quickly. I didn't keep even pressure so it came off textured. Time is dependant on the person, but I would say similar to ink, maybe a little bit longer.

I have seen some scratchbaord done where the person came back in and put colors, however I don't know how this is done. You can also order scratchbaord that is colors other than white underneath (including rainbow colors).

The wolf above is only the fifth scratchbaord that I had ever done. Why not just jump in and try it! Classroom quality scratchboard is $.59 for an 11"x14" piece...and most people have an exacto laying around in their house already. If not they too are pretty cheap...or get more exotic and get their tool set?



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Cathy Sheeter
Sheeter Zoo Crew Animal Art
www.geocities.com/sheeter_zoo_crew/

m_a_r_t_i_n
03-24-2001, 02:26 AM
This is great, scratchboard is great for rendering hair isn't it, I think once you master hair on scatboard you can pretty much render anything well that is hairy http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif lol
How is this medium for non-hairy subjects? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Barbara
03-24-2001, 03:55 AM
Cathy:
Thanks for the reply and the encouragement!
Another question: How do you do your initial sketch and transfer it to the scratchboard? I mean there is no erasing the scratched lines right? So you would need the drawing all worked out to go from. What do you use to get that onto the working surface since it is black?

I also wondered how they get the color into the ones I have seen with color in them. I wondered if they make their own and selectively color areas under the black before adding the black coating?? Maybe like a color value study of the subject under the black?? Or do they add the color on top of the scratched areas?

I may have to put this on my "to try" list! Thanks again for the info.
Barb

Barbara
03-24-2001, 03:58 AM
The process seems a little familiar to me but I am thinking that it reminds me of making print blocks in highschool. I wonder if you could make prints with a scratchboard drawing? Or maybe its not deep enough for that.
Barb

ReNae
03-24-2001, 06:44 AM
Cathy - he is gorgeous. You did a great job with the fur.

What size is this piece? And how long did it take you?

Warmth,
ReNae

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The bird sings not because it has an answer. The bird sings for it has a song.

animal
03-24-2001, 09:30 AM
This is Great! I agree with everybody else`s comments. I really like the texture of the wolf`s fur. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

Crias
03-24-2001, 10:42 PM
Originally posted by m_a_r_t_i_n:
How is this medium for non-hairy subjects? http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

I haven't tried many non-hairy objects, because I like teh hair effect so much. I think it would still be similar to ink...you could use stipple or hatching to do non-hairy objects. I personally look for animals with lots of coat texture that has contrast. I ahve plans to do a grizzly bear and her cub next and also have a nest of barred owls on the to-do list as time permits...both pictures have great texture for scratchboard.



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Cathy Sheeter
Sheeter Zoo Crew Animal Art
www.geocities.com/sheeter_zoo_crew/

Crias
03-24-2001, 10:50 PM
Originally posted by Barbara:
Cathy:
How do you do your initial sketch and transfer it to the scratchboard? I mean there is no erasing the scratched lines right? So you would need the drawing all worked out to go from. What do you use to get that onto the working surface since it is black?
I use pencil on top of the black very lightly. It doesn't erase very well so the fewer lines the better, or in areas that will be scratched out. Any area that will be scratched over will get rid of whatever pencil was laid down. I personally draw my pencil sketch on tracing paper first, then transfer it onto the scratchboard.


I also wondered how they get the color into the ones I have seen with color in them. I wondered if they make their own and selectively color areas under the black before adding the black coating?? Maybe like a color value study of the subject under the black?? Or do they add the color on top of the scratched areas?


I think the color is put on after the piece is done, though I'm not sure. You can come back in with colored ink and put it on the areas that are white. You can also use black ink to cover up minor mistakes...though if you look at a piece at the right angle the area with black ink are not the same thickness as the original black surface.




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Cathy Sheeter
Sheeter Zoo Crew Animal Art
www.geocities.com/sheeter_zoo_crew/

Crias
03-24-2001, 10:52 PM
Originally posted by ReNae:
What size is this piece? And how long did it take you?


Thanks everone for your nice comments. This wolf is 10"x13" in size. This piece probably took me about 10 hours to complete.



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Cathy Sheeter
Sheeter Zoo Crew Animal Art
www.geocities.com/sheeter_zoo_crew/

Crias
03-24-2001, 10:55 PM
Originally posted by Barbara:
The process seems a little familiar to me but I am thinking that it reminds me of making print blocks in highschool. I wonder if you could make prints with a scratchboard drawing? Or maybe its not deep enough for that.

The process is similar to printmaking, but the opposite. For print making you carve out areas that you want color...with scratchboard you scratch out areas you want white. It also isn't deep enough for print making. The black layer is maybe 1/32 of an inch thick, maybe less.



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Cathy Sheeter
Sheeter Zoo Crew Animal Art
www.geocities.com/sheeter_zoo_crew/