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animal
03-20-2001, 11:42 PM
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Mar-2001/horsejumping.JPG" border=0>

This is a horse and rider jumping done on Canson Sketch 9x12 with an HB pencil. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Roan
03-21-2001, 06:05 AM
I've posted this in Critiques as well:

This is much better than the first one you posted. Might want to check its right ear and left front foreleg. They look a little off.

Something to keep in mind about doing equines: three of the hardest equine things to draw are the eyes, ears, and hooves, and a lot of people just don't "get" ears at all. Many think that the "window" to a horse's personality (or soul, if you will) is through the eyes -- that's only half correct. The horse's personality or "being" is dependant on two things: the eyes and ears. The eyes only relay part of the emotion of the horse and are very subtle. The ears, however, tell a savvy horseman exactly what the horse is thinking or about to do. Every little movement tells you something about how that horse is going to behave. They very important to the overall look, feel and generated emotion of the animal.

As a kid I was taught that when you work around horses, you always keep part of your attention on the ears. Not only does it give you great insight as to what a horse is thinking, but it can save your skin too :P

As a result, I spent a lot of time drawing them too. Equine ears are fascinating!

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<FONT face="Script MT Bold"><FONT COLOR="#AB4835"><FONT size="5">Roan</FONT s></FONT c></FONT f>
<FONT COLOR="#8A1010">"Bu shoilleir a dhreach, 's bu luath
Shiubhal: Sith-fada b'e ainm." --</FONT c>
<FONT size="1">"Shining his coat, and speedy
His pace -- Si-Fada his name."
Si-Fada = "long pace"</FONT s>
RoanStudio.com (http://RoanStudio.com) &lt;--- supply resources for pastelists!

animal
03-21-2001, 11:47 AM
Thanks Roan for your comments. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

animal
03-21-2001, 02:18 PM
<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/21-Mar-2001/horsejump2.JPG" border=0> Here is the next upodate. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

pgetha
03-21-2001, 02:49 PM
Hi Animal,
I am wondering what you are using for reference here? I see some problems with the two back legs....an anatomy issue. The hip in the forground would block a lot more of the hip behind and the feet should almost be on the same plane. Without seeing the reference, I am just judging this on the angle of the horse. I saved your first image with the intention of doing a tracing where I see the trouble but you may not want me to do that. Let me know if you would like my opinion.
Pat

animal
03-21-2001, 03:08 PM
Thanks Pgetha for your comments.

I am using a Drawing book by Norman Adams and Joe Singer as my reference photo. Yes, I would like your opinion. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

m_a_r_t_i_n
03-21-2001, 03:32 PM
Developing nicely http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif ... keep posting the updates http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Ivyleaf
03-21-2001, 10:39 PM
Whoa, looking real good animal http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif Like what I see this far!

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"There's a time when you have to seperate yourself from what other people expect of you, and do what you love. Because if you find yourself 50 years old and you aren't doing what you love, then what's the point?" Actor Jim Carrey (Side note, substitute any age as appropriate :) )

animal
03-21-2001, 10:49 PM
Thanks Martin and Ivyleaf for your comments. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

pgetha
03-22-2001, 12:09 AM
Hi Animal, me again. I was wondering if you have ever tried drawing with a grid. This is a very good exercise that I did many years ago in highschool. We first had to draw our image freehand with all the details etc. Then we drew a grid over the reference and a grid on our paper. The purpose of the grid is so 1) you can enlarge your drawing and 2) you can draw proportion correctly by using the grid as reference points. I did this with my favorite subject. I thought the first one was really good but when I compared it to the second, the difference was unbelievable. The idea is to use an imaginary grid when drawing and reference points in relation to others to achieve proper proportion. It really works. Another trick is to view the work upside down and even work upside down. It puts a differnt perspective on things and helps to point out problem areas. A mirror has a similar effect.

I'll try to get to that tracing tomorrow. Try the grid exercise. You can make a very accurate grid on your computer using just about any software that can draw straight lines. You can then print it out on a clear sheet of mylar or trasparence film which you can pick up at an office supply. A laser one will hold up well so Kinkos could accomodate you there if you don't have a laser printer. The mylar grid can be used over and over.

You can lightly draw a grid on your drawing paper, being careful to keep things square and accurate. You must be accurate to achieve the full benefit of the exercise.

Pat

animal
03-22-2001, 12:39 AM
Originally posted by pgetha:
Hi Animal me again. I was wondering if you have ever tried drawing with a grid. This is a very good exercise that I did many years ago in highschool. We first had to draw our image freehand with all the details etc. Then we drew a grid over the reference and a grid on our paper. The purpose of the grid is so 1) you can enlarge your drawing and 2) you can draw proportion correctly by using the grid as reference points. I did this with my favorite subject. I thought the first one was really good but when I compared it to the second, the difference was unbelievable. The idea is to use an imaginary grid when drawing and reference points in relation to others to achieve proper proportion. It really works. Another trick is to view the work upside down and even work upside down. It puts a differnt perspective on things and helps to point out problem areas. A mirror has a similar effect.

I'll try to get to that tracing tomorrow. Try the grid exercise. You can make a very accurate grid on your computer using just about any software that can draw straight lines. You can then print it out on a clear sheet of mylar or trasparence film which you can pick up at an office supply. A laser one will hold up well so Kinkos could accomodate you there if you don't have a laser printer. The mylar grid can be used over and over.

You can lightly draw a grid on your drawing paper, being careful to keep things square and accurate. You must be accurate to achieve the full benefit of the exercise.

Pat

Thanks Pat for your comments. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif I have tried the grid before with portriats but have neve turned my work upside down. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

JaneS
03-22-2001, 04:19 PM
Animal, I don't really know a lot about horses, but, to me this looks good. You draw with more confidence all the time!

taghera
03-22-2001, 05:49 PM
Originally posted by Jane Sibert:
Animal, I don't really know a lot about horses, but, to me this looks good. You draw with more confidence all the time!

I agree with Jane on this one animal. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif



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If we were all geniuses we wouldn't need each other----------would we?

animal
03-22-2001, 06:09 PM
Thanks jane Sibert and Taghera for your comments. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif