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RAE99
10-30-2002, 06:37 PM
Here is a pencil/charcoal sketch I made from a photo. I think the rough textures in the stone work and rusted gears make for a good sketch subject.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2002/!-sugar-mill0003-pencil.jpg

Here is a "hand tinted" version that took a while... making separate layers for each of the various tints and shades I worked with...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2002/!-sugar-mill0003-hand.jpg

Here is a Photoshop gradient version of the black and white which I did after I did the hand tint one above. This one took about 6 clicks of the mouse. Hardly made the hand tint process worth it in this case.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2002/!-sugar-mill0003-gradient.jpg

;)

Ron

crazy_cat
10-30-2002, 08:13 PM
Doesn't that just drive you nuts? Work like mad on something then you try to replicate it with software and in 15 min or less you do! Love all 3 by the way!!:clap: :clap: :cat:

BeyondTheNineSquares
10-30-2002, 08:21 PM
All three are really lovely! I've just discovered digital manip and hadn't thought of trying it on a scanned drawing. I like working in pencil/charcoal and think that they were a great choice for this one, even without seeing the unretouched photo from which it came. Great job! You've inspired me to try a new direction. Thanks! I learn so much from my fellow WCers!

TeAnne
10-30-2002, 11:20 PM
Originally posted by RAE99
Here is a pencil/charcoal sketch I made from a photo. I think the rough textures in the stone work and rusted gears make for a good sketch subject.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2002/!-sugar-mill0003-pencil.jpg

Here is a "hand tinted" version that took a while... making separate layers for each of the various tints and shades I worked with...

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2002/!-sugar-mill0003-hand.jpg

Here is a Photoshop gradient version of the black and white which I did after I did the hand tint one above. This one took about 6 clicks of the mouse. Hardly made the hand tint process worth it in this case.

http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/30-Oct-2002/!-sugar-mill0003-gradient.jpg

;)

Ron

OMG. I love this. Excellent textures.

Bobby D
10-31-2002, 05:13 PM
I'm assuming the original ie #1 was drawn and then scanned into the computer. In which case a well deserved accolade. :clap: :clap:

However, in comparing the two computer generated tints I definitely prefer the hand tinted version. The colouring looks far more natural and therefore far more pleasing.

RAE99
10-31-2002, 05:38 PM
Bobby,

The first one was simply an original photo made into a digital drawing in Photoshop using layers, filters and PS tools. No real art media was used.

;)

Ron

jsr88
11-01-2002, 08:48 AM
Ron...THIS is the texture I was trying to explain in the barn thread. However, now that I look at it again, it may well be the *added* texture on the overall appearance of the piece that was impressing itself on my mind, rather than the brush used. ;)

I don't think that the two tinted versions could possibly be interchanged. The hand tinted one is most definitely worth the time it took to produce. (Of course, had I not *seen* the hand tinted one, the the PS applied version would be gorgeous. ;) ) I think I just figured out what my *personal* problem is with the gradient coloring. It's TOO predictable! :D AND it reminds me of those sheets of plastic we used to rub on the T.V. Screens *before* color television. (They looked great on the outdoor scenes of Gunsmoke...but made a kitchen scene look strange! :D )

Oh, now that I have THAT little factoid straightened out in my head...I can better enjoy the gradients. :D

Ron, this is a fabulous manipulation...and I surely do appreciate you sharing BOTH tinted versions with the forum.

QUESTION!! Could those gradients be applied on a separate layer and then re-touched...deepened in some areas, removed or lightened in others? Or possibly smudged or pushed so that they don't created a "predictable" demarcation over the entire image?