PDA

View Full Version : Contrasting underpainting?


gdlantz
09-03-2010, 01:36 PM
I heard a pastel artist say she starts with a contrasting underpainting, what does she mean by this? She uses sanded paper if that makes a difference. Any one know what she is talking about?

Ginger Lantz

sketchZ1ol
09-03-2010, 02:17 PM
hello

click ' Content Areas ' at the top of the page, then click ' Article Index ' in the drop-down menu, scroll down to ' Pastels ' - there's an article about underpaintings

complimentary/opposite colours on the colour wheel: - green over red, blue over orange, etc will have particu;ar vibrancy when the underpainting shows thru

extreme value contrasts is another possibility, but that's less often the case

:} Ed

Deborah Secor
09-03-2010, 02:39 PM
I teach a class on underpainting with complementary colors, and I did a thread on it a while back. I think she might mean this technique. Here's a link to it: Class: Learn Values via Complements (http://wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=476217). See what you think.

gdlantz
09-03-2010, 04:09 PM
Using just soft pastel without water or alcohol also considered underpainting? Thank you Ed and Deborah for the links, I learn something new here all the time, it's wonderful.

Ginger Lantz

Topdecker
09-03-2010, 04:46 PM
An underpainting is basically anything under the pastels. For instance, I plan on eventually using watercolors for my underpainting. Some people put a tonal study to act as a roadmap, some want bright highlights to sparkle through a darker over-painting, some want darker tones to act as shadows, some want contrasting colors, etc. etc.

It depends on your style, what you want to accomplish, and the individual needs of regions of your painting.

Tim

westcoast_Mike
09-03-2010, 04:53 PM
Using just soft pastel without water or alcohol also considered underpainting?

Aboslutely, check out Richard McKinley May 17th blog (http://pastelpointersblog.artistsnetwork.com/default,month,2010-05.aspx)

DAK723
09-03-2010, 05:53 PM
Using just soft pastel without water or alcohol also considered underpainting? Thank you Ed and Deborah for the links, I learn something new here all the time, it's wonderful.

Ginger Lantz
It's really all a matter of semantics! Different folks will define things differently. I think the term underpainting is usually applied when that first layer is predominantly different than the layers that follow. (Well, that's how I define it!) This can be because the colors are different than the final colors (as in the complementary underpainting discussed), or when you do the first layer in a monochrome or a gray (usually an oil painting technique) before you add colors later, or when the application or material is different - such as a watercolor underpainting, or using a water or alcohol wash.

The big advantage to using a water or alcohol wash is that it creates an underpainting layer without pastel dust. Because there is no loose dust, the next layer of pastel that is applied will not blend with the underpainting and the colors remain true. This can be especially important when using a complementery underpainting and you want both the underpainting colors and the next layer to remain vibrant. When blended together, as you probably know, complementary colors can neutralize each other.

Don