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yeti
11-09-2000, 06:56 AM
When painting in acrylic paints for dogs, do you put 'blobs' (thickness like in oil painting) on. I mean these 'blobs' are surely only round smooth mounds of acrylic paint. Does one have to use a special brush (or knife!) to make a fur/hairy like texture to the painting. I don't think I would like to see just smooth mound after mound beside each other and shiny to boot, without having some sort of texture thereon. Help I'm a beginner completely at this, so don't laugh at my question. Thank you.

animal
11-09-2000, 07:08 PM
Yeti Welcome to WC. I am to a beginner in acrylic, but have drawn animals and birds for a while.I am going to practice more though,Sorry I can`t answer your question

LarrySeiler
11-09-2000, 11:56 PM
Yeti...

There are different ways to achieve a convincing texture other than using thick paint. Effects that can be made with color, values of lights and darks...etc; Here is a Wisconsin entree I had about a decade or so ago for our state duck stamp competition. The paint is smooth, perfectly flat with no impasto-like texture.

That does not rule out thick impasto like paint, which is one of my favorite methods of painting with oils. Larry

<IMG SRC="http://www.wetcanvas.com/Critiques/User/black_lab_duckstamp.jpg" border=0>

tammy
11-09-2000, 11:57 PM
Hi there,
I love details myself and if you are talking bout the fur, and this isn't for everybody. The way I do it in acrylic is paint in the color of the fur mass first.
Like I said I love details and after doing the massing in of color first it doesn't bother me a bit to use a script liner brush with diluted paint of a slightly different tone from the main paint mass and I paint over the color lots of individual hairs!
I know, talk about tedious, but it gets interesting.
Have fun.

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Tammy "I MUST be an Artist, artist".

animal
11-10-2000, 12:02 AM
Look at keys to painting fur and feathers by Rachel rubin wolfe

tammy
11-10-2000, 12:02 AM
Oh, Larry
I don't see why Yeti might not be able to use a painting knife for texture also, even in acrylic, do you? Also Yeti could indicate the texture scraping with the knife or end of the brush throughout the paint (well if Yeti is fast knowing the fast drying quality of acrylics http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif. Whatcha think?

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Tammy "I MUST be an Artist, artist".

LarrySeiler
11-10-2000, 08:30 AM
True Tammy....
if you want a thicker impasto oil like drag with acrylics use the Opaque Extender from Liquitex which used to be called, "gelex."

I have a lesson on Artschool, in the archive doing an acrylic that looks like an oil painting and fools them all.

I think personally that one of the best ways to get a handle on texture is to know what it is supposed to look like from the viewer's position stepping back. It should IMHO, only look like a thickly applied near chaotic mess up close, but look masterly laid from several paces away. The "effects of laid brushwork thick or thin should work together to bring a convincing image. It should not yet look like a thick impasto application from any distance away from the work. Up close a mess. Back up, very realistic.

Now...having said that, this is not easy to learn to do.

It may best be learned by first learning what texture ought to look like from a few paces away to begin with.

In that case...whether the paint is actually applied thick and impasto'ish to get the effects of texture, or other rendering devices are used thinly to get the same effect is of little consequence.

It happens to require more genuis and control in my opinion to skillfully lay down what appears a mess up close that looks like realism farther away.

Now..having said all that...unless I told you my dog was painted thinly, you wouldn't know it. The image appears realistic. We have to approach the work and look close to see what technique was used. Up close, you would say..."wow, he used a knife to do this and that...!" or, "he used careful building up of layers, lights and darks and various contrasting principles to do this or that!"

I guess what I'm saying is, don't confuse technique with results! Texture is an illusion whether it is achieved thinly or thick. How one does it is akin more to personality and preference.

Larry http://lseiler.artistnation.com

animal
11-10-2000, 08:10 PM
Thanks Larry and Tammy
As I am just learning how to paint with acrylics, the information will help me too http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

tammy
11-10-2000, 09:29 PM
Originally posted by animal:
Thanks Larry and Tammy
As I am just learning how to paint with acrylics, the information will help me too http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

You are very much welcome. I've done acrylic 13 yrs and still learning. Larry's advice is almost always helpful.


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Tammy "I MUST be an Artist, artist".

yeti
12-19-2000, 05:21 AM
Originally posted by yeti:
When painting in acrylic paints for dogs, do you put 'blobs' (thickness like in oil painting) on. I mean these 'blobs' are surely only round smooth mounds of acrylic paint. Does one have to use a special brush (or knife!) to make a fur/hairy like texture to the painting. I don't think I would like to see just smooth mound after mound beside each other and shiny to boot, without having some sort of texture thereon. Help I'm a beginner completely at this, so don't laugh at my question. Thank you.

Being newish to puter, I think I sent a thank you for your answers to my above poser, but maybe it didn't arrive. I admitted to not actually being the artist, my daughter was, but I didn't want to explain so much, so I just said it was for me to save time. (Now I'm wasting it!) Anyway she did try a facial portrait, mainly the hair area in acrylics and I was rather surprised that it turned out so well. And looking at yr answers we both could see what you all were driving at. Thank you. But because of time and obviously needing more practice, she instead used pen and sketched from a photo of her boyfriend's dog. My husband framed it and everyone was delighted. She still has the paints around, and I'm sure she will be doing other drawings later on. You all gave her the confidence to battle on. Thanks.