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View Full Version : Where are all the printmakers?


timelady
10-20-2002, 02:43 PM
What, is there some secret printmaker society meeting that everyone's at???? Come out come out wherever you are!!!! ;) I hope you're not all stuck under the blankets of your presses...

If there is a secret society can someone show me the handshake?

Tina.

sassybird
10-21-2002, 02:15 AM
LOL Tina, I have busy working on prints for a show this next week. I have also got several pieces in different stages of acid dips, and am trying to talk my husband into building me an aqua tint box. I know Gisela is busy with shows at the moment, and the rest who knows....lol

I had hoped the news of the discounted lino press would spark some interest. It is knocked down to a very affordable price, and I know so many who would enjoy owning one.

Let's go hunt down those stinkers that have posted in here, and put a sticker under their blankets to spur them on:evil: :angel:

misscat
10-21-2002, 06:58 AM
Hi,

I am based in London , United Kingdom.
It is quite hardhere as well for printmakers. There are only a handful of galleries dealing with prints and a couple of art societies.
the printmakers Coucnil PmC is one of them.
You can check them out on: http://www.printmaker.co.uk/pmc/gallery/index.html

I am always looking for new shows/op[portunitiues, so if you know of anything, let me know
;) http://www.printmaker.co.uk/pmc/gallery/index.html

timelady
10-21-2002, 07:13 AM
Actually, most galleries I know are quite happy to exhibit prints. Many have print bins alongside stuff on the walls and the artists I know do printmaking and painting... hmm....and you're in London, I'm surprised at your post! Check out galleries in South London (Greenwich, Lee Green, Beckenham, Clapham) and north London (Hamstead, Primrose Hill, etc. though I don't know these as well). Also visit the Affordable Art Fair to find galleries and flip through Galleries magazine for finding places to visit (it's an A5 format magazine and very hard to find - if you can't find it let me know and I'll send you a copy from the next batch that comes in to our gallery). On the whole printmakers I know tend to do better than painters because editioned work is more affordable per piece.

So now I have to confess that I don't do much printmaking anymore. :( I decided that I prefer to paint all the time. I don't have the patience for etching! :) (And sassy be *very* careful with an aquatint box - make sure it's completely sealed and you always wear a mask. My mentor has just had a cyst removed from her nose and is just grateful it wasn't cancer.) I might do some monoprinting soon though for a change...got a pile of nice handmade khadi paper that's been sitting around for months.

Well, if everyone's busy with shows then that's a good excuse. :)

Tina.

sassybird
10-23-2002, 02:36 AM
I have all the safety gear required for the aqua tint work :D Dave knows how toxic it can be also, and he is very good at fabricating things. I am sure he will make it air tight. I am going to have him build it in the garage, so that way none will end up in the house. I have my little hot plate to melt it on, and can pick up another cheaply at the second hand store to continue using in the studio for inking and grounds. My little hot plate has a flat surface much like a griddle. Thank you for your concern. I try to remind people about safety all the time too, and any new non toxic techniques and clean up products I come across also.

misscat
10-23-2002, 06:11 AM
Hi Tina,

I did not realised you were in London too.
I do paint as well as print. Do you have any upcoming shows? I'd like to come and meet you.

Catherine

neutrahouse
10-23-2002, 02:11 PM
I am an adult student pursuing my dream of an art diploma.

My Printmaking course has been a complete disappointment to me. Because of all the work has to be done in class, there are time constraints - I'm not as painstaking with the drawing as I'd like to be. Lining up to use the press isn't fun either.

So far I've made one drypoint plate, one etching, one acquatint with colour experiments and one softground. The only print I'm truly happy with is the one print I made from the drypoint. The softground prints were a disaster - they look like badly drawn cartoons, although I know I can go back on the plate with the softground and put in more texture and line.

My question to you experts is: am I too impatient - others in my class are achieving beautiful results right from the get go. Maybe this isn't my forte. Maybe I should stick to painting and drawing...

:confused: Neutrahouse

misscat
10-24-2002, 03:19 AM
I remember my first classes. The truth is that I had no expectation apart from learning the technique. It is true some prints worked and some were ... less nice.
The funny thing is that other students and teacher liked the ones I did not like and did not like teh ones I liked.
Etching IS a SLOW process. One you can work on, you can correct, improve, erase, start again until YOU get the result you are wishing for.

You are not impatient, just need to practice.
Try to look around for a studio where you could use the press to your needs and experiment.

Good luck

neutrahouse
10-24-2002, 09:11 AM
Originally posted by misscat
I remember my first classes. The truth is that I had no expectation apart from learning the technique. It is true some prints worked and some were ... less nice.
The funny thing is that other students and teacher liked the ones I did not like and did not like teh ones I liked.
Etching IS a SLOW process. One you can work on, you can correct, improve, erase, start again until YOU get the result you are wishing for.

You are not impatient, just need to practice.
Try to look around for a studio where you could use the press to your needs and experiment.

Good luck

Thank you....we have an open studio here in Toronto but it costs $1,000 a year! :eek:

timelady
10-27-2002, 01:16 PM
Don't worry Neutra - it might not be for you, or you may not have discovered the way you might most enjoying using it! Have you done soft ground etchings? I enjoyed that much more because I'm very impatient - you draw directly into the soft ground - and you get a much more pencil like line, soft. On the whole I find intaglio printmaking very irritating because I jsut want results NOW! That's why most of my plates are monoprints, I really don't have the patient to edition something! haha.

You might also enjoy collograph - which is building up a plate like a collage. Then printing it the intaglio way. In a way it sounds like you need to let yourself play a bit more and not get so caught up in details and preciseness just yet. And of course there's monoprints! And linocuts. These 2 don't necessarily need a press so you can do them at home. I used to cut lino at home, and I print monoprints just off a piece of glass or perspex. (There's a monoprint lesson sticky at the top of this forum.)

Don't beat yourself up about it if you don't want to do printmaking. My painting teacher egged me on for a couple years before I'd try it. After 2 weeks I finished my first plate and prints and she was quite ready to let me get on with painting. :D I DO like inking and wiping plates though, very therapeutic. I think I'd enjoy printing other people's plates as a part time job.

Tina.

neutrahouse
10-28-2002, 09:55 AM
Originally posted by timelady
Don't worry Neutra - it might not be for you, or you may not have discovered the way you might most enjoying using it! Have you done soft ground etchings? I enjoyed that much more because I'm very impatient - you draw directly into the soft ground - and you get a much more pencil like line, soft. On the whole I find intaglio printmaking very irritating because I jsut want results NOW! That's why most of my plates are monoprints, I really don't have the patient to edition something! haha.

You might also enjoy collograph - which is building up a plate like a collage. Then printing it the intaglio way. In a way it sounds like you need to let yourself play a bit more and not get so caught up in details and preciseness just yet. And of course there's monoprints! And linocuts. These 2 don't necessarily need a press so you can do them at home. I used to cut lino at home, and I print monoprints just off a piece of glass or perspex. (There's a monoprint lesson sticky at the top of this forum.)

Don't beat yourself up about it if you don't want to do printmaking. My painting teacher egged me on for a couple years before I'd try it. After 2 weeks I finished my first plate and prints and she was quite ready to let me get on with painting. :D I DO like inking and wiping plates though, very therapeutic. I think I'd enjoy printing other people's plates as a part time job.

Tina.

Thanks Tina....

Actually my most recent attempt was soft ground and I have to say I prefer my aquatint results. I'm looking forward to tomorrow's class because I'm going back to my softground plate to add more detail to see if I can get an improvement.

I've got some lino at home ready to go and I can't wait to try it. Also the monoprint lesson is printed and ready.
But this collograph - has anyone posted a lesson on that? Sounds great..

Neutra

timelady
10-30-2002, 05:32 AM
Okay, that sounds like an order for a collograph lesson. :) While I don't do them a fellow artist in my building does. So I'll bug her about taking photos of her progress and writing an article. How does that sound? I think with collograph photos are useful, so a sticky lesson might not be enough. Might take me a wee while... (but is a really good excuse to procrastinate cleaning my studio)

Tina.

neutrahouse
10-30-2002, 09:49 AM
Wow...that would just great.

In the meantime, I re-did my softground plate last night and was much happier with the results. I needed a lot more line. Next class I'm adding aquatint and I think that will be even more of an improvement.

I also went back to my drypoint - I still like this the best - and worked on the plate and got better results there too.

Neutrahouse:)

nonamac
11-04-2002, 12:10 AM
Originally posted by misscat
I remember my first classes....You are not impatient, just need to practice.

I loved my first printmaking classes two years ago, but I never did develop the patience for the more complicated forms of printmaking. I get the greatest joy from monoprints -- always a surprise and often astonishingly beautiful. I get giddy from a two- or three-hour printing spree!!

Is there a name for building up an image by monoprinting layers?? Way fun!!

Macky

timelady
11-04-2002, 11:17 AM
Monoprinting can be as many layers as you want! :D

Just to let you all know I haven't forgotten about you. It's a big hectic at the moment with open studios in 3 wks and an art fair in 2wks. Drafting the lesson, but have to find time to capture my printmaking friend in action for the illustrations (she doesn't know yet, haha). There will be an article eventually...

Tina.

misscat
11-04-2002, 12:01 PM
are you doing the Battersea Arts fair?