PDA

View Full Version : "untraditional" additives to arcylic paint


-paul-
06-17-2001, 03:19 AM
i have only tried one small acrylic painting.
i have started oils. (i'm not a snob...i think though that relating past "masters" and the time-honoured history of them though pulled me towards them)

Anyways, since acrylics are "plastic"
per se, right?, could one add any powder etc. to them for effects, such as sand or whatever and not worry about a bad something happening?

just curious....

------------------
Everybody is an artist;
now, whether one choses to be referred to as one or not is another story.... -paul-

Willem
06-17-2001, 10:46 PM
:) hello Paul
I have done several paintings in acrylic and added sand directly to the paint and used also "impasto"( so is it called in germany) to ad sand in greater amount to the painting together with paint or without paint, and I also worked with impasto and surgical gauze on canvas
hope that helps, if you get further questions please send an e-mail
willem

cuttlefish
06-18-2001, 11:19 AM
You can mix just about anything into acrylic paint, with a few possible exceptions:
1. Do not mix anything oily or greasy. Oil and water do not mix.
2. Do not mix anything that will rust or otherwise react with water, unless that's what you want to happen. Metallic sodium is right out.
3. Do not add chlorine bleach or other chemicals that react with the acrylic medium to produce toxic gases.
:D

woopla
06-18-2001, 11:58 AM
Not to be overly cynical, but can anything related to acrylics be untradional?

:D

Dave

carly
06-19-2001, 12:20 AM
There are also a lot of new mediums on the market for adding to your acrylics....tar medium, mediums with beads, irridescent, sand, glitter, etc. You can add almost any thing that will adhere with your paint or medium as mentioned before.

Recently I saw someone use kitty litter! instead of sand for texture and it worked great!
carly

Deb
06-19-2001, 12:06 PM
Of course it was clean, unused kitty litter!

But what about painting on paper? Can you use any paper and do you have to coat it with an acrylic medium before you start painting?

cuttlefish
06-19-2001, 11:24 PM
Sure, you can use acrylic on paper. However, as a waterborne medium, it will cause all the buckling and degradation that other water based paints cause, depending on the quality of the paper. Fortunately, once it's dry, acrylic will serve to bind and protect the fibers. No need to worry about rot like with oil on paper, eh?

sarkana
06-20-2001, 08:52 AM
acrylic on paper is totally fine! i don't gesso or coat my paper with medium as it seems unnecessary. acrylic is nondestructive and can be applied directly to almost any clean surface. it's not wrong to gesso first, you just don't have to.

i tend to paint more thinly on heavy printmaking paper or matte board. i just pin it to the wall and buckling is minimal. thinner paper will buckle but you can tape or glue it down like a watercolorist and when it dries buckling will be minmal the most solvent portion of acrylics in this context is the water!

ThinkSeeDraw
06-26-2001, 05:20 PM
i didn't mean to post twice!

ThinkSeeDraw
06-26-2001, 05:50 PM
Ok, i made a panel with 8 sections, 4 for acrylic and 4 for acrylic gesso. (I tried the kitty litter, and it was HORRIBLE. i would like to know what type you are using, cuz it has to be something else.) I tried 4 different additives from my front yard. Dirt from an ant mound, kitty litter, tiny pebbles and small pebbles. amazingly, the ant dirt was VERY NICE! :clap: it made a fabulous sandpaper texture, and made the gesso a pretty tan color!

I will use it in the future.

also, when i made each square, i did the top part by brushing it on with a soft brush and the bottom part by using a foam roller. very different textures.

So go dig up your ants, (be careful not to get stung!)

i guess the fact that ants are so picky is what makes the dirt so fine and even! I love it!

i may post a pic if i ever figure out how! :cat:

cuttlefish
06-26-2001, 11:45 PM
With fine powders, and quite likely absorbent granules like kitty litter, you may need to add a surfacant to allow the water/acrylic emulsion to mix without being repelled. Also, in the case of absorbent clays, like kitty litter, it may be beneficial to use a more viscious medium, like heavy gel or modeling paste, with a generous amount of extra water. The added water will be soaked up by the granules anyway, dehydrating as the paint drys normally, and the heavy gel will tend to stay between the grains rather than flow out the bottom.

Don't take my word for this, though. I haven't yet tried this myself, but I'll report back when I do.;)

espax
06-28-2001, 06:29 AM
Anyone try white flour?

Last year I sold a triptych with three similar panels. Additionally, I painted a fourth panel in a similar style. It was for my personal collection and I was open to experiment a bit.

To the paint was added gelex and a bit of white flour. Within days, the flour had gentle cracking effect, however adhesion does not seem to be a problem. Gave it extra time to cure before varnishing.

VictoriaS
06-28-2001, 12:51 PM
Espax: That sounds like something I'd want to try. I've hated all of the texturizing gels (pumice, glass beads, etc.) I've experimented with. But what is Gelex?

Victoria

espax
06-28-2001, 01:55 PM
Gelex is the (former?) name of liquitex's Matte Opague Extender Gel Medium.

sarkana
07-04-2001, 12:37 PM
Originally posted by strawberrrie
amazingly, the ant dirt was VERY NICE! it made a fabulous sandpaper texture, and made the gesso a pretty tan color!

now you are thinking like an old master! if you were in siena or umbria, you'd be making a raw umber or raw siena variant! <kidding> i hope you do figure out the photo thing because i'd love to see how this looks.

and i feel so inspired <sigh> by my fellow acrylic enthusiasts' love for experimentation!

jheinrich
07-15-2001, 10:31 AM
Originally posted by strawberrrie

i guess the fact that ants are so picky is what makes the dirt so fine and even! I love it!

i may post a pic if i ever figure out how! :cat:

I would think the ants chewed up the dirt from below very well before depositing it at the top of the hill- hence the fineness.

I wanna see, too!

j*

Chrysalis
07-24-2001, 12:54 PM
Hi - I'm new to posting here - have tried salt in acrylic - worked great but was heavy on the canvas - had a great lava like texture when it dried -

I have also used cutouts of acrylic painting on paper - cut out section that I liked and incorporated into an acrylic painting on canvas.

Also - crushed glass or polished stone.

You can also spray alcohol onto a thin acrylic wash and get nice raindrop effect - the paint has to be fairly thin

I look forward to getting more ideas here.

Einion
07-25-2001, 03:41 PM
Two additives I have tried are talc and baking soda:
Talc can be difficult to mix in to prevent some clumping (unless you want this of course), but it does give an interesting subtle matt finish when the paint is dry.
Baking soda provides quite a bit of "tooth" or roughness to the dried film (particularly in thinner films) and is a lot less harsh on your brushes and palette knives than sand of a similar particle size.

You can also get a range of additives from Kremer including <A HREF=http://www.kremer-pigmente.de/intl.catalog/epigmen13.htm>mica and metal powders</A>, <A HREF=http://www.kremer-pigmente.de/intl.catalog/epigmen14.htm>fillers</A>, <A HREF=http://www.kremer-pigmente.de/intl.catalog/epigmen15.htm>extenders and thickening agents</A> that are definitely worth taking a look at.

Einion

PHB
08-07-2001, 03:07 PM
My first acrylics teacher suggested that we add ordinary drugstore glycerin to the paints on the palette to retard their drying, instead of the more expensive retarder. I used to use it with finity and it did make the paints kind of jelly-like, smoother to apply, and it did retard their drying on the palette.

My next acrylics teacher said that this was a bad practice, as the glycerin might be too acidic or in some other way affect the painting's archive-ability. So now I don't know what to do.

Does anyone know the right answer to this question?

cuttlefish
08-07-2001, 05:36 PM
Originally posted by PHB
My first acrylics teacher suggested that we add ordinary drugstore glycerin to the paints on the palette to retard their drying, instead of the more expensive retarder. I used to use it with finity and it did make the paints kind of jelly-like, smoother to apply, and it did retard their drying on the palette.

My next acrylics teacher said that this was a bad practice, as the glycerin might be too acidic or in some other way affect the painting's archive-ability. So now I don't know what to do.

Does anyone know the right answer to this question?
Glycerin is gooey and permanently water-soluble. It is sometimes used in watercolors as a binder and drying retardant. I'm inclined to think that in large enough proportions glycerin would leave acrylic prone to resolubility, but a few drops in a large mass of paint shouldn't cause too much problem.

Propylene glycol is what is usually used in commercial acrylic drying retarder. I've never heard of glycerin being specified for this purpose.

Einion
08-08-2001, 01:09 AM
PHB, glycerine is often recommended as a cheap retarder for acrylics and assuming you don't use too high a proportion I have not read any specific problems associated with it chemically.

From the Golden website "Humectants, agents that absorb or hold water (such as glycerin), also have been added to retard or slow drying. However, [they] must be used with extreme care as they tend to percolate to the surface of the film during drying, leaving a residue..." (I believe I have had this experience with a commercial liquid retarder). From another source "Rapid drying can be halted by adding [a] propriety retarder or by using pure glycerine with the paint."

As a rough guide use no more than 10% by volume but I would try to use less; you could try mixing the glycerine with water and using this mix to thin your paint, it might be a good way to keep the proportion down.

If you paint on canvas the Golden website has a really good tip that might be of use on their page about <A HREF=http://www.goldenpaints.com/drying.htm>drying</A> (see Soaking the Back of the Canvas near the bottom). There's a lot of other good info on this page also worth looking at.

Einion

Leaflin
08-17-2001, 11:20 AM
Crushed up Mica adds an interesting effect.

ThinkSeeDraw
08-17-2001, 08:47 PM
Oh my god, it's finally here!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
http://www.wetcanvas.com/community/images/17-Aug-2001/DCP_0181.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/community/images/17-Aug-2001/DCP_1082.jpg

http://www.wetcanvas.com/community/images/17-Aug-2001/DCP_1083.JPG

http://www.wetcanvas.com/community/images/17-Aug-2001/DCP_0184.JPG

one of them is taken to show how bumpy the large rocks are....

Tell me what u think!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ThinkSeeDraw
08-17-2001, 08:51 PM
oh no, what happened!??!????!?!??!?!

Einion
08-19-2001, 07:41 AM
I managed to download one to my hard disk but none of my graphics programs can open or view it although it does appear to be 'headered' correctly as a JPEG. How did you save the images?

Einion

P.S. How did you attach four of them?

ThinkSeeDraw
08-19-2001, 09:12 PM
I used the image uploader on all 4, and to post 4 of them, i just clicked the img button, typed it in, said ok, then did it again...
let me try one at a time. here's the first ;)http://www.wetcanvas.com/community/images/17-Aug-2001/DCP_1081.JPG

ThinkSeeDraw
08-19-2001, 09:13 PM
oh poop:mad:

anyone know what's going on??? I can give u the name of the pictures and anything else u need

sh_maztag
08-20-2001, 08:21 PM
i love acrylics bcause in addition with other medias they seem to b of upper world :angel:

it represents translucence of dreams

can b mixed with eyerything but oils. ive practiced with vitrai colors and tiners even, they run toghether , the act of absorb and reply that can b frozen in a moment .

crazi4art
08-26-2001, 10:57 AM
strawberry,
atttach your file.....you can only attach one file at a time but it works. go to the near bottom of the reply page and it says attachh file and clcik on browse and find where you have saved your pics!
~Crazi

crazi4art
08-26-2001, 11:00 AM
you guys had some really cool ideas, i might have to try them myself.....
~crazi

Epicurea
08-27-2001, 03:47 AM
Sawdust, ash, earth, bits of dried foliage, small bits of dried, scraped up acrylic.

Acrylic also makes an excellent binder (glue) for collage/assemblage/mixed media works...apply random object (paper, foil, cloth, fibers, dried leaves, dried flowers) to wet acrylic & let dry. Paint over, or not, as desired.

And then there's application materials/techniques...almost anything can be used to actually apply the paint, or to make imprints. I've seen an acrylic/mixed media work that used the imprint of part of a hand towel, and I've seen a couple others that were painted over old dried pallettes (canvas or paper), which made for great texture. I've used the plastic wrap technique quite a few times (lay wrinkled plastic wrap over wet paint & let dry, remove & then develop whatever you see in the patterns, or leave as is, or drip different colors into the wrinkles after the first layer dries before removing the wrap, let dry again, etc.). I've also used the pouring technique in conjunction with a sheet of acetate just for experimentation; the paint in this case had bits of dried & scraped up acrylic in it. The results were quite interesting, I just didn't like the shapes I ended up with.

With a little creativity applied not just to the image but also to mix-ins, materials, and application, the possibilities are almost endless.


Cassandra

ArtMarkie
08-28-2001, 11:07 AM
Hello strawberrie,

I am doing some acrylic painting now. I want to build up
one area, maybe 1/4 inch higher than the rest of the canvas,
but not solid or flat. How have the pebbles worked for you?
Do they stay, or do they tend to fall out due to weight?

ThinkSeeDraw
08-28-2001, 07:04 PM
hmmm... the large pebbles tend to get knocked off when appplied with a thin wash, but if the paint is nice and thick then it should do fine.... I just thought of something... what about wood chips and mulch?? (rinsed clean of course!!) But the thing is, u need to make sure that u have enough, cuz the less that there is, the more spread out the bumps will be, and the more likely for them to get knocked off ;)

if u have any other questions, please ask, i'm always open for any of your questions ;)

cuttlefish
08-29-2001, 12:28 AM
Originally posted by strawberrrie
hmmm... the large pebbles tend to get knocked off when appplied with a thin wash, but if the paint is nice and thick then it should do fine.... I just thought of something... what about wood chips and mulch?? (rinsed clean of course!!) But the thing is, u need to make sure that u have enough, cuz the less that there is, the more spread out the bumps will be, and the more likely for them to get knocked off ;)

if u have any other questions, please ask, i'm always open for any of your questions ;)

If you use sterilized soil ammendments (free of live bacteria and fungi) you should have no problem, save the inherent acidity of most types of wood chips. Don't use anything composted unless you steam it for an hour in a pressure coker. If you don't, the little nasties will reproduce and devour your painting.

ThinkSeeDraw
08-29-2001, 10:57 PM
WOw! DId u read about steaming the wood chips somewhere?? That is a great idea!! I wonder if u should let them dry completely, or if it's ok to throw it on your paint....

What if u steam it with baking soda in the water??? would that prevent it from going bad long after it had been used?? just a though;)

cuttlefish
08-30-2001, 03:24 AM
Pressure steaming is just a basic sterilization method; it has nothing to do with mixing the organic material into paint except to get the bugs out beforehand and forestall decay. The professional equipment for this purpose is called a steam autoclave, used mainly for medical/dental instruments. A stovetop pressure cooker with a steaming rack will do the same job, though perhaps not up to clinical standards.

Adding baking soda to the steam water may help buffer the acids in the wood products, but will more likely cause scale buildup in your pot.