PDA

View Full Version : Trouble with primer


SusieGS
08-17-2010, 11:26 PM
I have discover I love sanded papers. I have alot of paper already which is not sanded. I purchased ColorFix Primer, and am attempting to use it to prime those papers. The most recent was Canson paper. It rippled. While it was still dampish, I put foam board on top of it, and weighed it down, but it still rippled. I did have it taped to backer board. Any suggestions? :(

Lynndidj
08-17-2010, 11:58 PM
Sorry - I haven't tried putting ColorFix on Canson. I know that some people will do a wash on Canson or "set" their pastel with some water - but I've never done that either. I just don't like Canson. ColorFix works great on watercolor paper - especially on the 300lb.

Lynn

allydoodle
08-18-2010, 12:46 AM
I have used the Colourfix primer, and it does work really well. But, not on Canson paper. Canson paper does not take water media very well, so I just use it for quick portrait workshops, and very ocassionally a small landscape or still life. No primer or wet stuff though.

If you have any watercolor paper, even failed paintings, the Colourfix primer works well. Even the 140 lb paper is just fine, I tape it down well on a piece of foamcore board, and then apply the primer with a disposable foam roller, in a criss cross application. I let dry, and do 2 - 3 thin coats. I prefer hot press paper, as it has no 'bumps', but cold press works okay too. This is the only way I've used the primer so far, but it is successful, and I do recommend it.

Deborah Secor
08-18-2010, 01:16 AM
Or use your AS primer on mat board. If you don't have any and are inclined to work small, go to a friendly framer and ask if you can purchase the fall-outs from mats already cut. Usually they'll sell that to you for a good price. The primer works quite well on that. I use acid free mat board, or purchase 4-ply rag mat to use with primers. It makes for some very nice textures that I enjoy.

You can turn your Canson over to the smoother side and use a fine sanding block to soften it. Lightly abrade the surface, raising the nap of the paper. That helps a little, making it a bit more fun to use, IMHO.

robertsloan2
08-18-2010, 04:17 AM
They're right. It's worked well for me on 140lb watercolor paper both in a pad and in a block, as long as I leave some border on the sheets with the pad it flattens out again. It's worked out great on mat scrap. 300 pound watercolor paper is like heavy cardboard, almost like mat board - and that will not buckle at all, that stuff's great with it.

Hot press leaves no texture but the Canson, cold press may depending on the specific cold press texture of the brand give some additional texture. But this doesn't usually interfere with pastels unless I'm trying to do an ACEO with pastel pencils and need minute details with strictly controlled clean lines. Anything else the texture just livens it up.

It doesn't work well on Canson paper and that was one of the first things I tried, though taping it down flat when I did it and giving it an inch of border between the primed area and the edge got one small piece to dry flat on Canson paper.

It actually worked decent on 90lb watercolor paper once because I left a bigger border, flattened again after it dried.

One surface that happily surprised me was how well it worked on canvas boards. Yep. There's a little bit of canvas texture left but for the project I was doing, that was all right. It wasn't as extreme as before the priming and the sandy texture was beautiful on it. So now I'd probably use it on canvas pads too - bearing in mind that I'll have a double texture if I do.

I think it would also work very well on wood panels, but maybe priming it with a regular gesso before using the Colourfix would be a good idea to seal the wood.

I make practice paper on the cheapest 140lb watercolor paper or pads, and the happy result is that it works the same as the good paper for good paintings that I do on 100% rag watercolor paper. Also, watercolor blocks help eliminate the buckling just as they do for watercolor. When I use the primer on blocks, I can and do take it right to the edge, it has no problems.

Studio-1-F
08-18-2010, 09:51 AM
I have discover I love sanded papers.Yes! Bravo! I have alot of paper already which is not sanded. Uh oh. I purchased ColorFix Primer, and am attempting to use it to prime those papers. The most recent was Canson paper. It rippled. While it was still dampish, I put foam board on top of it, and weighed it down, but it still rippled. I did have it taped to backer board. Any suggestions? :(
You actually didn't have 'trouble with primer'. You had trouble with Canson. But anyway, a few suggestions:
-- Throw all the ripply Canson away. Kidding! :heart:
-- Use the ripply Canson for sketches, notans, and color tests
-- Use good PVA glue to attach it to rigid museum board or foamboard. You can try weighting it and maybe the ripples will stretch out again, with the dampness of the glue. Though that's not a guarantee.
-- Well, hmmmmm. Back to the top: throw (or give!) the ripply Canson away :heart: :heart: :heart:

Jan

Potoma
08-18-2010, 09:58 AM
If you're really motivated to use the Canson, I would tape it around all edges to some masonite and try a thin layer of gesso on it. If it takes, I'd do 2-3 coats. Then I would try pastels on that with and without a layer of primer.

Sounds like a lot of work and time, though, to save some Canson!

SusieGS
08-18-2010, 10:22 AM
Thanks everybody for your wonderful input! I"m so glad it wasn't just me screwing it up! :) I don't really care for the canson, was just trying to figure out a way to like it better. I will try your suggestions for improving it without primer, and it looks like I'm going to be buying some mattboard and watercolor paper! I'm also going to save this thread for future info, I case I forget! I have a packet of sample sanded papers, and will be playing with those, so an order for more of those will be in the future, also.
Again, thank you so much!!! :D
SusieQ