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Sonia7373
05-30-2001, 04:52 PM
Hello again, my fellow acrylic visualists!! Hey that sounds pretty good. Anywho, just wanted to know if anyone out there uses the stay wet palette? Rumor has it they will keep your acrylics wet for up to 10 days or more. Of course, I scoff. What do you guys think? I have heard you can rig one of these at home pretty cheap and I would love to hear some ideas from you guys. I don't have a lot of mechanical ability so go easy on me. Tee hee.
Sonia

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"Over a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

VictoriaS
05-30-2001, 05:38 PM
Hi, Sonia.

I got a John Pike watercolor palette. I use the cover as my acrylic palette. I line the cover with three or four layers of damp paper towels (actually, I'm using Handi-Wipes now for more permanence), and then put a layer of kitchen parchment on top of the paper towels. The parchment is not absorbent, but enough water filters through that it keeps your paint workable for many days. (I use the watercolor palette part as the cover.) Once I left some acrylics in the palette untouched for a couple of weeks -- not even tightly covered, the wc palette just kind of resting on top -- and was surprised to find the paint was still wet and usable.

Victoria

Sonia7373
05-31-2001, 09:40 AM
Thank you Victoria. That sounds like an economical answer. I have everything except the wc palette. Will check them out this weekend at the art shop. Thanks so much!!!
Sonia

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"Over a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

GC
05-31-2001, 05:19 PM
I have been using the Sta Wet palette for about 6 month now and it's invaluable.
I am getting me another one.
Acrylics stay wet for as long as you like.
I usually change the paper once a month.

Ginette

Sonia7373
06-01-2001, 09:54 AM
Thanks Ginette. I may just invest in one. Got to have the right tools, ya know? Thanks for the input, I feel better knowing someone else speaks well of it.
Sonia

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"Over a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

RedShoes
06-01-2001, 05:14 PM
I too can vouch that the Stay Wet Palettes are DEFINETLY worth the investment. I was reluctant at first because it was around I THINK $20 at the time. Seemed like a lot for a plastic container. If properly taken care of however, the thing will last you a lifetime probably. You might have to replace the sponge from time to time. The rubbing alcohol is a good top. I had never heard that. I messed around and let one got that "auroma" to it. Not the most pleasant smell.

GC
06-02-2001, 12:29 AM
Originally posted by Sonia7373:
Thanks Ginette. I may just invest in one. Got to have the right tools, ya know? Thanks for the input, I feel better knowing someone else speaks well of it.
Sonia


You are very welcome Sonia.
I just though of one more thing I need to add.
The StaWet palette comes with a special sponge and paper that you need to wet and put in there.
One thing I do is add some rubbing alcohol underneath the sponge. I just poor some in to the palette before I put the wet sponge in.
I helps to keep the inside from starting to small musky after a couple of weeks.

Ginette

GC
06-03-2001, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by DavidF:

I recall in other threads on this subject, some more experienced folk complain that the wetness involved with these palettes thins the paint too much and prefer to use a dry palette.

Cheers, David


Parchment sounds like a good idea, I will try it out.
In the beginning I experienced the thinning problem too.
I solved that by NOT soaking the sponge too much and keeping the paper just moist.
I used too much water in the beginning.
I underdo the water. First thing after opening the palette is spraying the entire surface slightly with a spray bottle and just repeating it as needed.
That way they don't thin and don't get a skin.

That rhymed! Funny :-)

Ginette

DavidF
06-04-2001, 12:39 AM
$20 for a stay-wet type palette? For once there's something we can get cheaper in UK than you in the USA. $10 to $14 is more typical over here. Also, as intimated by Victoria above, you can economise by using paper towels and grease-proof paper (= kitchen parchment?) when you have used up the consumables supplied with the palette.

I recall in other threads on this subject, some more experienced folk complain that the wetness involved with these palettes thins the paint too much and prefer to use a dry palette. However, for my part I just get a nervous breakdown about the paint going solid, so I always use a wet palette. But then I'm no expert.

Cheers, David

Sonia7373
06-04-2001, 09:37 AM
Okay, you guys, thanks to all your fabulous input, I got a really cheap water color palette with a cover and the sponge and refill paper for the original Sta Wet palette. Was much cheaper this way, most expensive part was the refill sponge $6. Thanks to everyone who replied great info. I'll let you guys know how it goes. Oh, would a couple drops of bleach do the same as the alcohol? Break down paint? What do you think?
Sonia http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

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"Over a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

GC
06-04-2001, 11:30 AM
Originally posted by Sonia7373:
Okay, you guys, thanks to all your fabulous input, I got a really cheap water color palette with a cover and the sponge and refill paper for the original Sta Wet palette. Was much cheaper this way, most expensive part was the refill sponge $6. Thanks to everyone who replied great info. I'll let you guys know how it goes. Oh, would a couple drops of bleach do the same as the alcohol? Break down paint? What do you think?
Sonia http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif


I don's know how watercolor palettes are, but one thing that is really important is that the lid fits very tight.
With the sta wet I must say it fits very tight. It's even bet than a tubber ware.
About the bleach, I personally would worry about it eating up the sponger after a while. It can be harsh if one uses a bit too much.

Good luck let us know it goes.

Ginette

Dave Carter
06-11-2001, 12:41 AM
Tupperware from yard sales for pennies fill many nooks of my studio. Many shapes and sizes. I use them for acrylics, watercolors and oils. If I mess one up and don't want to bother cleaning it, I just throw it away!

jasper
06-13-2001, 05:59 PM
Originally posted by Dave Carter:
Tupperware from yard sales for pennies fill many nooks of my studio. Many shapes and sizes. I use them for acrylics, watercolors and oils. If I mess one up and don't want to bother cleaning it, I just throw it away!

I use butter containers.

or ...

use a canvasboard as my pallette and let the acrylics dry on it to create HUGE texture for a later painting.

Sonia7373
06-13-2001, 06:09 PM
You guys are great. What kind of butter container. You mean those little square plates with the little covers??? What a fabulous idea about the palette board. My adventures in Sta Wet land are going well.
Sonia

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"Over a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

Kevin M
06-13-2001, 08:57 PM
My Stay Wet pallette is an old 10x12 photographic dish with a piece of polyester cloth over a sheet of foam rubber. I recall cutting the cloth from an old golf umbrella. That was some time in the 80's.

Kevin Artwork (http://homepage.eircom.net/~bot/paint/page2.htm)

diphascon
06-15-2001, 04:57 AM
Originally posted by Sonia7373:
Oh, would a couple drops of bleach do the same as the alcohol? Break down paint? What do you think?
Sonia http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif


Hi Sonia,

if "bleach" is the thing I think it is (we can buy sth called alike here in Germany) it has the power to make dirt unvisible not by taking it away but by destroying it's colour due to some oxidative talents ...

I would not like the idea it's near to the pigments of my paints. In addition, I do not estimate its anti-microbial versatility that high. Instead of ordinary alcohol (ethanol) I would recommend to try isobutanol (the fluid that smells like a clinic) which is a bit less fugatile and not degradable by microbes like ethanol (you might evenually encounter the experience that your ethanolized palette smells like vinegar http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif )

just my 2 dpf

martin adler


[This message has been edited by diphascon (edited June 15, 2001).]

WasArtistInOtherLife2
06-16-2001, 12:12 AM
I would like to respond to the message about using bleach under a sponge to keep your paint moist.

Would Van Gogh, Renoir, Michaelangelo, Dali, or any other great artist, have used bleach NEAR their painting? When I paint, I think about the days when the great artists were living. I don't mean to sound rude, but the paints we use now have not changed much in the last few hundred years. Don't change it now!

Thanks for reading!

"Have a great day tomorrow, since chances are, today is half gone."

cuttlefish
07-13-2001, 07:09 PM
"Bleach" here in the U.S. usually refers to Sodium Hypochlorite. It is a powerful antimicrobial, but is also highly reactive -- it releases toxic ammonia gas when in contact with ammonia bearing materials, like acrylic paint.
Golden recommends using household ammonia (cleaning fluid) as an antimicrobial preservative.

I think peroxide based bleaches (widely used here as antiseptics) are more popular in Europe, based on your description.

Originally posted by diphascon


Hi Sonia,

if "bleach" is the thing I think it is (we can buy sth called alike here in Germany) it has the power to make dirt unvisible not by taking it away but by destroying it's colour due to some oxidative talents ...

I would not like the idea it's near to the pigments of my paints. In addition, I do not estimate its anti-microbial versatility that high. Instead of ordinary alcohol (ethanol) I would recommend to try isobutanol (the fluid that smells like a clinic) which is a bit less fugatile and not degradable by microbes like ethanol (you might evenually encounter the experience that your ethanolized palette smells like vinegar http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif )

just my 2 dpf

martin adler


[This message has been edited by diphascon (edited June 15, 2001).]

Crystal30311
12-16-2007, 04:07 PM
I know this is a really old post but if anyone is out there I would really appreciate a response.

I was wondering if you could use wax paper instead of parchment paper to make a stay wet pallet.

TIA,

Crystal

metalhead
12-16-2007, 04:35 PM
Probably not wax paper, but I've heard you can use freezer paper.

I used a stay-wet palette for awhile, but it seemed like it was more like a "stay soggy and moldy" palette, so I kind of quit. Now I just waste some paint and live with that.

lebediker
12-16-2007, 04:47 PM
I know a woman who keeps her acrylics in a similar palette. She sprays her paint with vinager every now and then to keep the must down. For my HS students, I have students use these "film container units" that have 5 film like containers. Bad for mixing but great for keeping small amounts of 5 colors seperate and wet...

paintbrush1974
12-16-2007, 06:43 PM
ive not had my palette long about 6 months..but not to look at!!!...

i noticed a big improvement in my paintings when i started using it..

you can use grease proof cooking paper for the top sheet..you can buy a huge roll from supermarket..

also heard if you put a penny in the bottom it stops mould!

karen.

Einion
12-16-2007, 09:42 PM
I know this is a really old post but if anyone is out there I would really appreciate a response.
We'll forgive you just this once :)

I was wondering if you could use wax paper instead of parchment paper to make a stay wet pallet.
Not if it's actually coated with wax - wax paper, instead of 'wax paper' (you know how things are named these days!)

For the membrane paper you need something that water will go through so that as it evaporates from the surface of the paint it draws it up from the reservoir.

Einion

Crystal30311
12-16-2007, 10:11 PM
Thanks Everybody

Crystal

cadub
12-17-2007, 08:26 AM
Hi
You can also put copper pennies under the sponge to ward off mould - I would recommend rinsing the sponge in DILUTE (1/4) javex occasionally and cleaning the container with the same once in a while.
Hope this helps
Carol D

idylbrush
12-17-2007, 11:15 AM
There is a whole bunch of info on this in the information kiosk if you are interested.

Carol, you got me with javex. Not a clue what that might be. Could you clarify please?

For info only. You can get cheap sheet sponges at places like Ace Hardware or some of the low end department stores. I have used them for years since the replacement sponges are a bit pricey. The secret with all of this is to know when to be frugal and when not.

In conjunction with the paper you can use milk bottle caps and it helps diminish the soupiness of the paint and yet keeps it moist and fresh.

Bob Rooney
12-17-2007, 12:49 PM
I'm sure I read someplace that alcohol shouldn't be used to clean acrylic paintings. For that reason I have always used a couple of drops of bleach in the staywet palette and that has worked well. No noticeable problems with 5 yr old paintings.

idylbrush
12-17-2007, 01:57 PM
I'm sure I read someplace that alcohol shouldn't be used to clean acrylic paintings. For that reason I have always used a couple of drops of bleach in the staywet palette and that has worked well. No noticeable problems with 5 yr old paintings.

I believe that alcohol can break down the acrylic and remove it. So, unless that is the intent it might not be a good thing to keep alcohol around.

It sure can make for some wonderful experimental effects though and shouldn't be overlooked. (see Acrylic Revolution).

idylbrush
12-17-2007, 03:05 PM
Here is a link to the stawet thread in the information kiosk may be worth a read.

sta-wet thread information kiosk
(http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=232463)

BeeCeeEss
12-17-2007, 05:31 PM
You can make a quick throw-away version of a stay-wet palette by soaking a stack of paper plates (the type that are called grease resistant or coated) and inserting 2 wet paper towels between each paper plate. Press down on them to make good contact with the wet paper towels and squeeze out any excess air. Squeeze your paints out on the top one and use the rest of the space for a mixing area. The moisture from the wet paper towels will leach up through the paper plates and keep your paints from drying out. An occasional misting from a spray bottle of water will also help. When the top plate becomes too crowded, just peel it off along with the paper towels just below and you have a brand new, clean mixing surface.

I sometimes work with two sets of these. One is for holding the paints, the other is to mix my colors on. I prepare enough of these to get me through a long painting session. If I want to keep them overnight (or for a few days), I slip them into a gallon-sized Zip-Loc freezer bag and seal it up tight. It will keep the paints moist and fresh until my next painting session.

Note: It's important to get the coated (grease resistant) paper plates and not the non-coated kind. The non-coated plates will begin to disintegrate when they get wet and you'll get little globs of paper fiber in your paints. Not fun!

I don't recommend keeping these sealed up for more than 2 or 3 days at a time, however. They will start to get musty. At the first hint of any mold, I pitch them and start anew.

I usually use this set-up for when I'm working with standard body (tube) acrylics. I do use a Sta-Wet palette when I'm working with my fluid acrylics, but only for overnight storage. I squeeze my fluid acrylics into small porcelain dishes--the kind with several circular wells for holding paint. I mist these occasionally during a painting session and that is enough to keep my paints moist and workable. When I'm finished for the day and it's time to put the paints away, I then place the porcelain dishes into my Sta-Wet Palette Keeper box with the dampened sponge inside and cover the tops of the dishes with a clean sheet of plastic food wrap. Then I place the top on the Palette Keeper and seal it tightly. Once a week, I wash out the Palette Keeper and the sponge with a solution of Lysol cleaner in water to prevent any mold formation. I can keep my paints workable for weeks this way.

Beverly

Kevin M
12-17-2007, 06:46 PM
What works for me is a very fine weave polyester cloth - the type that is 'almost' waterproof. Lasts for many years and doesn't shed lumps of paper fibre onto your brush. Spread it over a piece of damp foam and give it the occasional mist. Cover - but don't seal - the holding container between daily sessions.


Kevin

cadub
12-18-2007, 07:43 AM
Hi idylbrush
Javex is just bleach - guess that is a Canadian thing! LOL

Crystal30311
12-19-2007, 09:27 AM
Thanx Everyone that responded to this old thread. You all are such a help.

Crystal

JB
12-19-2007, 12:05 PM
Many interesting posts. I personally use the Masterson Palette and like the 12X13 size. The area where containers sit I removed and now there is a nice place for me to double a papertowel (damp of course) and my paints go on there. i love using their paper to mix my paints on, just throw it away when your finished. I tried using glass instead like Jerry Yarnell does but found that under lights and all, the paints dry so quickly! I did not like the 14X18 size though, too large to fiddle with.

Kevin M
12-19-2007, 09:50 PM
[QUOTE= I did not like the 14X18 size though, too large to fiddle with.[/QUOTE]

I found exactly the same. 12x10 has proved plenty big enough for me. When I move to a different colour zone I wash out the pallette and put a different set of colours in place. INMHO Trying to keep track of a large pallette of colours is a pain in the neck to the point of being impractical.

Kevin

jgary1
12-22-2007, 02:23 PM
Some stores now sell Tupperware-like storage containers with O-ring seals. They really are air tight. I bought one that is about 8" X 9" and lined the lid with a piece of glass over some neutral gray paper. I use the lid as my pallet and lay it next to my painting surface upside down. I put a narrow strip of wet paper towel on the glass to place the paint on. I mix my paints on the glass. When done, I place the box over the lid and snap the locking arms closed to seal the O-ring. This sucker keeps paint wet for a long time! The glass is also easy to clean up.

c1omr
01-19-2008, 11:17 AM
I just got a Sta-Wet Palete from Pearl Paint, This is a must have!!! I love it...

Koji

Tiasa
01-20-2008, 11:23 AM
I use wax paper over wet paper towels in a small butcher tray, but I think a glass baking dish with a flat bottom would work also. Then I cover it with plastic wrap which sticks really well to the butcher tray or glass.

I usually pour boiling water over my paper towels and squeeze it out later. I also pour boiling water into the tray each time I change the wax paper. Then I dry out the tray. I have only had a mold problem once and it took about a month to develop. I use 2 sheets of wax paper to reduce the amount of water that the paint absorbs. I often leave paint on this palette for 4-6 weeks since it takes me forever to finish a picture. If I finished them in a week or two, I don't think there would be a problem with paint absorbing too much water.

I bought a stay-wet palette and returned it because getting the lid off was next to impossible. I had visions of me launching a half-open palette of paint across a room.

Einion
01-20-2008, 01:54 PM
I use wax paper over wet paper towels in a small butcher tray, but I think a glass baking dish with a flat bottom would work also.
True wax paper is impermeable to water though isn't it?

I bought a stay-wet palette and returned it because getting the lid off was next to impossible. I had visions of me launching a half-open palette of paint across a room.
:lol:

Einion

Tiasa
01-20-2008, 02:13 PM
True wax paper is impermeable to water though isn't it?

I would think so, but this calls itself was paper--and it doesn't tell me what it is made of. It is permeable though. :)

BigEpsilon
01-20-2008, 06:26 PM
I like the stay wet palette except its too big. It does keep your paint wet but I find it to be to bulky, I know they have a small one and I've been thinking about getting one of those.

BeeCeeEss
01-20-2008, 09:36 PM
I bought a stay-wet palette and returned it because getting the lid off was next to impossible. I had visions of me launching a half-open palette of paint across a room.
:lol:
I had a lot of trouble with the lid on my Stay Wet palette, too. I have a lot of arthritis in my hands and it's getting harder and harder to do some things that require grip strength, etc. But I found a handy gadget in my local supermarket that helps get the lid off that palette keeper. It looks like an over sized bottle opener and it is made specifically to pop the seal on jar tops such as jam or jelly jars so it's easier to open them. I found that I can pry open the four corners of my Stay Wet palette keeper, then peeling the lid off is pretty easy.

Like you, it takes me a long time to complete a painting so I do a weekly cleaning of my Stay Wet palette keeper. I use the sponge liner but not the paper liners since I put my liquid acrylic paints in small porcelain paint dishes. I store the paints inside the palette keeper overnight. Once a week, I rinse out the sponge liner sheet in a solution of Lysol cleaner. I also use this to wash out the palette keeper box and lid. Then I close it up again. I've never had a mold problem since I started doing this.

Beverly

Einion
01-20-2008, 10:26 PM
I would think so, but this calls itself was paper--and it doesn't tell me what it is made of. It is permeable though. :)
Well the name doesn't matter if it works http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/20-Aug-2003/3842-thumbsup.gif

For anyone that's wondering about this, I was just checking if the paper were permeable because without that the palette won't work the way it's supposed to during painting, when the box is open for long periods; any paper that does work as a membrane lets water come up from the reservoir into the paint, to replace the water lost by evaporation.

I like the stay wet palette except its too big. It does keep your paint wet but I find it to be to bulky, I know they have a small one and I've been thinking about getting one of those.
You can make one yourself quite easily using any sealable plastic container so having one a custom size isn't too difficult. I sometimes have three on the go at one time - one large and two half-size ones - and because they're homemade the cost was minimal :)

Einion

MrsG_SoCal
01-20-2008, 10:27 PM
I had a lot of issues with mold on the sponge of my sta-wet palette, so now I just use paper towels and throw them away when I change palette paper.

tubbekans
01-21-2008, 01:21 AM
I keep my Sta-wet pallette in the refrigerator, and have only had a mold problem once in several years of use. Also, you can rub a little petroleum jelly on the edges of the pallette lid to make it easier to remove and install. I believe I read that tip in this thread, or another one in the acrylics forum.

I just took my sta-wet out of the refrigerator and started using it to paint again after probably 6 months. I didn't realize the lid was not sealed completly when I put in there. The underside of the lid was covered with water drops when I opened it. Lots of water! I just tilted it over the sink and drained it out. No paint lost and no problem for the paint. I am using the same paint right now to do a painting from last time I stored it. No mold, no runny paint, no problem. I think the cold really helps keep the mold problem to a minimum. Best to close the lid tightly though... oops.