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dots
10-13-2002, 01:58 PM
The Critical Path by R.Buckmaster Fuller wow makes my head burn .
Most books by Robert Anton Wilson, Wilson is like a great are teacher who turns you on to new things,He loves all things to do with writing and always mentions other writers
Mark Leyner ( this guy writes like no one else)
William Gibson (early works) i think he came up with the term cyber space.
Its great to curl up on the floor underneath some art project that has been frustrating you into a stupor with something to think about other than your work.....

so please tell us about that book! there was a section in here about music that was a real ear opener .....you guys made me listen to stuff that i was so narrow minded about that i pre judging and guess what? Its really good to paint to or do laundry to ............

paintfool
10-25-2002, 04:51 PM
I haven't read the book but i smiled a bit in reading your post because i've found myself more than a few times in my life being pre-judgmental about music as well as other things! :) This really could be one of the things that can hold some of us back in our creative thinking. I don't think we can open all of the creative channels that are available to us if we always stay with the 'comfortable' route!
Cheryl

impressionist2
10-25-2002, 06:55 PM
Dots, Thank you for that suggestion. I am probably going to wind up reading all books recommended by this forum.

Just wanted to add that in the book, "Think Out Of The Box" by Vance, one suggestion is to engage all of your senses when you are thinking about creating. The concept is called "Sensanation", and it makes use of sight, sound, taste, touch and smell. I would add the sixth sense to that as well.

For instance, if you are painting pears, for example, you might want to spend some time actually smelling and tasting the pear ( well, an extra pear). Mush it up and feel it and see how it sounds as you squish it. Meditate on a pear for a few minutes, how it came to be, how it ripened on the vine, etc. Get all your senses involved prior to painting it.

Another suggestion is to go out and buy yourself a set of magic markers and a box of crayons, and when you plan out your next painting or idea, do it in color with those child-like writing implements. Also, if you own the book, and don't mind marking it, underline passages with different color markers that impress you.

Also use different colors to plot out your Master Plan for your art goals.

Renee

debi-d
11-03-2002, 04:47 PM
the one minute millionaire.
Great book, very inspiring for bringing it all togeather. Its not just about makeing money but dispelling any "old" ideas that you may have about money- being evil, dirty etc.
Its also about tithing and helping others.

this is one of the good ones buy the guys who write chicken soup for the soul

arcanna
05-29-2003, 03:21 PM
A recommendation for anyone in ANY area looking to open up to creative freedom:

Free Play: Improvisation in Life and Art
by Stephen Nachmanovitch (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0874776317/qid=1054235764/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-5702690-9716804?v=glance&s=books)

(this links to Amazon for this book)

I read it about 5 years ago - It's a beautiful read and a great inspiration.

mesasone
05-29-2003, 04:26 PM
School is wrapping up for me, and I've been looking for some good reading material for over the summer. This thread should help greatly... but rather than just listing titles, could you guys give quick descriptions..?

Shari
06-02-2003, 10:11 AM
One of the books that has greatly inspired me is "Life, Paint, Passion" by Michelle Cassou. This book frees you to be a child and paint with joy, without worrying about the goal or the outcome. There is a sequel to the book called "Zero Point." Another book I am reading is "Marry Your Muse." All these books are great for just freeing up and letting go. There are people everywhere holding classes based on the "Life Paint Passion" book. I was in a major rut, and couldn't pick up my pastels for anything, so I started taking this class. All we do is paint (with tempura) for 2 hours. You are not allowed to think about what you want to paint. You have to just splash color on the paper and let the picture paint itself. Each time I do it, I feel freer.

Shari

O'Connor
06-03-2003, 04:03 PM
Illusions by Richard Bach
This book has a subtitle like "the adventures of a reluctant messiah".
Essentially it presents you with an opportunity to consider the several perspectives of a given reality.

O'Connor
06-03-2003, 04:08 PM
Carl Sagan's book "Cosmic Connection" is also good. It considers a more universal and immemorial perspective of our tiny Earth.
Another interesting book was "The Naked Ape" which looks at the human species from a zoological perspective. I'm sorry I don't recall the author at the moment, but it was critically acclaimed when released so I'm sure it could be found.

Ron van den Boogaard
06-06-2003, 01:55 PM
Originally posted by O'Connor

Another interesting book was "The Naked Ape" which looks at the human species from a zoological perspective. I'm sorry I don't recall the author at the moment.....
Desmond Morris

also good anything by J. Krishnamurti (not U.G.) especially the one with the conversation with David Bohm.

Drifter
06-08-2003, 03:38 AM
Its not just books that can help someone stay out of the box - music too. I love to listen to smooth jazz while I work.

Keep a personal journal. I also keep a "notebook" in which I write down some of my ideas and come back later to them to expand on them.

SanDL
06-12-2003, 07:41 PM
I just dusted off "Power and Innocence" by Rollo May. It's about 40 years old and reads like it was written today. It's an exploration of the causes of violence. It has an interesting chapter on the artist as rebel, and the meaning of rebel in particular.

A great bit of music to work by is Clarence Clemons "Peacemaker" and John McLaughlin, Al Demeola, and Paco Delucia's "Passion, Grace and Fire".

CarlyHardy
06-15-2003, 01:48 AM
Fearless Creating by Eric Maisel is one of my favorites. Its for creators in any field outlining the fears that we face when beginning a new work all the way thru completing and showing it. He opened my eyes to many of the reasons why I struggled with self doubt in my choices when making my art...and it really helped to understand that I didn't have to be stopped by fear at every step in the process.

Has excellent exercises throughout the book and some great quotes in the margins to keep you thinking and exploring...instead of giving up.
I'd recommend anything by Maisel if you're an artist.
carly

JoyJoyJoy
06-15-2003, 11:34 AM
Thank you, all, for your suggestions... I have written them all down, and intend to add to my library when sales pick up... hahaha.

Speaking of Eric Maisel, I recently picked up two of his books on Amazon.com.... "The Creativity Book, a year's worth of inspiration and guidance" and "The Van Gogh Blues, the creative person's path through depression." I have read about one-third of each... and both are incredible, having already changed my perspective on many things about creativity and being a creative.

"The Van Gogh Blues" addresses the tendency that creative people have to be depressed, moody, and/or "in a rut" creatively. Unlike most of our society, which is easy to label us with mental illnesses, Maisel understands that the creative mind mulls over deeper issues, asks more abstract questions, than the average, non-creative mind... issues dealing with meaning. The meaning of life, our lives, our art. I highly suggest this book for any artist who has dealt with a search for meaning, or who deals with depression/anxiety or a mental health diagnosis.

"The Creativity Book" is a natural extension of the "Blues" book. It speaks directly to the daily concerns of being creative, from the viewpoint that what we need, because of our search for meaning, are ways of putting meaning into our lives. The book gives alot of inspirational and practical ideas to do this.

Maisel, better than any author I have found (and I am a major reader/searcher for information), has a grasp of what the artistic/creative mind is all about... and he writes with great respect for us, unlike many others who have quick "creativity" solutions or see us as interesting research subjects for depression/mental illness. Maisel writes in the abstract way that most of us actually think... making the books often too "heavy" for non-artists, but giving someone like me a great deal of practical information and comfort.

Nance

O'Connor
06-20-2003, 11:01 AM
Interesting bit about soul-seeking, introspection and depression.
Are artists just too sensitive? Or is that what makes them artists?
I hardly know a creative person (myself included) that is not introspective, sometimes brooding deep-thinkers.
The blues? Don't get me started!!

Cathy Morgan
06-22-2003, 10:52 PM
I may be the last person here to have read Eckhart Tolle's The Power of Now. Sat outside today and finished it. Now I'd like to read it again from the start. What a wonderful book! It's about presence - being - letting go of "psychological time" - using the mind as a tool rather than letting the mind run us.

Oddly enough, I saw this book in my local grocery store. It's one of those grocery stores that has a big book section. I'd heard of the book. Picked it up, glanced inside, read a couple of sentences about "psychological time" and put it in my shopping cart.

What a relief to have this book at hand! I can't recommend it highly enough. It's the kind of book that opens a door into the soul - into full life.

jeaberg
06-25-2003, 10:43 PM
No kidding- I think everyone I know is on anti-depressants. Or should be. Overly sensitive, struggling, humble, easily taken advantage of, no self esteem. And these are the people I love most in the world! All these traits should be held in high regard.

jeaberg
06-25-2003, 10:44 PM
Sorry- I'm replying to Paz- that's why there's a no kidding.

tao-man
07-08-2003, 08:04 AM
I highly recommend "Picture This: How Pictures Work" by Molly Bang. She is an award-winning children's book illustrator that takes you through the step by step process of creating a picture for a Red Riding Hood story. But she doesn't just talk about technique, she goes into the psychological reasoning behind her choices. It's even more fascinating that she creates her picture with cut out construction paper shapes. Using such an abstract (and accesible) medium really opens it up for others to play with the same methods.

Don't let the title of Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud fool you. While the book does talk about the comic art form, it is also heavily into graphic theory. Sequential art (a more accurate term for comics) has been around since the days of the Egyptians. Every artist and creative type that I have loaned this book to has been blown away. Fascinating stuff.

batarena
07-08-2003, 03:50 PM
Just looking around at all the books around me. Here's one I liked, "The Art of Possibility: Transforming Professional and Personal Life" by Rosamund Zander and her husband Benjamin Zander. Here it is on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0142001104/)

An excerpt from the editorial review:
The lure of this book's promise starts with the assumption in its title. Possibility--that big, all-encompassing, wide-open-door concept--is an art? Well, who doesn't want to be a skilled artist, whether in the director's chair, the boardroom, on the factory floor, or even just in dealing with life's everyday situations? Becoming an artist, however, requires discipline, and what the authors of The Art of Possibility offer is a set of practices designed to "initiate a new approach to current conditions, based on uncommon assumptions about the nature of the world."

-
Bill

Cathy Morgan
07-08-2003, 04:21 PM
Yes yes yes to The Art of Possibility! I think it's the first book I wrote about when I started my online journal. My entry is the March 2, 2003 entry (http://radio.weblogs.com/0120691/2003/03/02.html) . What I wrote focuses especially on the part in the book about "Giving Myself an A." There's much more in the book than that.

DanaT
07-08-2003, 05:40 PM
These are all book I want to read. thanks everybody for making this thread a great resource for creativity!

SanDL
07-08-2003, 05:53 PM
Originally posted by tao-man
I highly recommend "Picture This: How Pictures Work" by Molly Bang. She is an award-winning children's book illustrator that takes you through the step by step process of creating a picture for a Red Riding Hood story. But she doesn't just talk about technique, she goes into the psychological reasoning behind her choices. It's even more fascinating that she creates her picture with cut out construction paper shapes. Using such an abstract (and accesible) medium really opens it up for others to play with the same methods.



I would like to underscore this. It is very, very good and it is a highly useful teaching tool.

jeaberg
07-09-2003, 11:34 AM
I love the book Art and Fear- the perils (and Rewards) of artmaking by I think David Bayles and someone. This is a great read. It's small but full of good insights into the creative process and what keeps us from it.

Also- I just recently read Cannery Row by Steinbeck. Of course, it's not a self-help book or creativity opener per se, but it's written so well and it's (for me) one of those books that opens your eyes simply because it's a wonderful story with wonderful characters.

Isn't it great we can read these posts and then click on over to Amazon and buy the books used for cheap$$$$$$$!

SanDL
07-09-2003, 12:43 PM
Originally posted by jeaberg
I love the book Art and Fear- the perils (and Rewards) of artmaking by I think David Bayles and someone. This is a great read. It's small but full of good insights into the creative process and what keeps us from it.


I have to agree again! That one is on my night table.

O'Connor
07-10-2003, 09:05 AM
Cannery Row & Steinbeck. There's inspiration.
Steinbeck was an outcast among the illuminati of his day. Never really got the respect and appreciation he deserved while he was alive.
Critically bashed and seen as an upstart outsider, he's another fine example of how we have to die before our work becomes really valuable.

(Fortunately, Steinbeck did get to see some of his work garner acclaim, The Grapes of Wrath among them.)