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View Full Version : FINALLY deliberately broke some pastels. Feel like I've turned a corner :-)


Anne-Marie
08-11-2010, 09:50 PM
Hi everyone!

Well, July came and went, taken up in large part with switching out the master bedroom and my former studio so I could have more studio space. Very time-consuming but so worth it. I love my new space, even as I continue to tweak it.

A friend came over a couple weeks ago to ring in the new studio with me and we got busy with our art. I started a piece based on an illustration that interested me. I picked it up again yesterday and it the midst of doing the details, I realized I needed a sharper edge and so--yes!--I BROKE my pastel (for those of you who don't know, this has been a huge issue for me. I'm new to pastels and the idea of DELIBERATELY breaking a pastel was just huge hurdle to jump.) I was amazed at how well it worked out--that the pastels (Terry Ludwigs and Faber Castells) broke very nicely and cleanly, and they produced sharp, clear lines. I also was able to use the sides better to scumble (sp?) and blend. Just like people here had been trying to tell me!!! :clap: I also am forcing myself not to continually wipe my pastels (unless they are really dirty) and not worry about them touching eachother. I am trying to mindfully use this--the opportunity to make art--de-shackle me from useless compulsions that negatively impact my productivity, my creativity, and my happiness.:clap:

Thanks to all for helping me get over this one! Yay!:clap:

(see pix for the "evidence" ;-) along with the work-in-progress)

creatividee
08-11-2010, 10:20 PM
Seeing the title of your post made me smile. I too was resistant to breaking the sticks...guess it goes back to the childhood when getting a new box of crayons and wanting to keep them as "new" as possible...doing best not to break them, not taking the paper wrappers off, keeping them in order, etc. Glad you're enjoying your new space!

Anne-Marie
08-11-2010, 10:50 PM
Thank you, Dee. Yes, it's so true: breaking a crayon was a near tragedy in kindergarten--especially if they were new! Thanks for making me smile--

Lynndidj
08-11-2010, 10:54 PM
Congratulations Anne-Marie!! I felt the same way some time ago but learned that I couldn't work with most pastels unless they were broken into smaller pieces. The real kicker was at Christmas when my husband gave me a set of Girault pastels, and I went to my studio and broke each and every one of them and put them in my travel box!! I thought to myself as I was doing it, anyone who doesn't paint pastels would think I was nuts!!

Way to overcome those Kindergarten compulsions!!!

Lynn

robertsloan2
08-11-2010, 11:00 PM
I went through the same thing with my pastels. Then I broke all of a set of 60 so that I could consolidate all of the colors into one of its two 30 stick boxes and that's made them much easier to use on their sides. Lynn, you're right. Anyone but pastelists would think it was nuts.

I remember buying replacement pastels when they broke in the 90s, because I didn't get that and never worked with them on their sides.

Anne-Marie
08-11-2010, 11:23 PM
Lynn--:lol: okay, that made me laugh. I related a story in June/July, when I first got my pastels and accidentally broke a few when a box fell and my husband was absolutely aghast (because he knows me and knows this is a near-tragedy in my world) It does make me feel like more of a "real" pastellist to bite the bullet and--SNAP!

Robert--:heart: I've been meaning to write you! I don't think you realize just how many people's lives you touch. It seems whenever I'm bogged down with something on the art front, I google it, go to the site and: there you are, generously providing reviews, insight, how-to's, you name it! Just last night, I was like, ooooh, let's see . . . somewhere Robert talked about using a medium to make regular paper sandy, but where was that post? Was it in pastel talk? Was it in the journal page? And so I googled it and found a great reivew of Art Spectrum Pastel Primer, looked at the name of the review, and it was: you! As always, such great info! You are truly a class act.

I did remember that you once said to someone here: once you get in and break your pastels, they are ready to go. And I thought at the time: oh dear, no. But of course I should have suspended my reluctance. You were right, of course. :)

Must rush over to Art Journals to see what you have been doing there. I have been quite AWOL from WC this past month, for reasons both happy and sad. But it's so nice to have this forum and the other one to see what everyone is doing, recharge, connect, and get inspired--

johndill01
08-11-2010, 11:31 PM
Anne-Marie, here's one more who finally found some freedom by breaking my pastels. It was not real difficult to break some of the long round pastels, but my TL's were off limits. UNTHINKABLE to break those. But once the step was made, the pieces seemed to work on their own. Total freedom with layering, blending, etc. Brought the joy back to pastels for me.

Congratulations for making that leap of faith.

John

Anne-Marie
08-11-2010, 11:49 PM
Yes, John you said it: JOY. That is fantastic. And that is what so much of this is about, isn't it? Glad to hear you re-experienced it anew! Yay!

Potoma
08-12-2010, 12:25 AM
It's about time! Good for you.

SillyBaZilly
08-12-2010, 12:33 AM
Isn't it amazing how so many people think alike. I went through it and still do. I just broke 4 new schminckes today and waited til the last possible minute to do so. It must be something in the sticks :)

Anne-Marie
08-12-2010, 12:57 AM
Thanks, Potoma!

Corey: I know. They are so appealing when they are new. So full of promise! But then I look at the pictures of those will advanced sets in studio cases sorted by color and think that that is appealing, too. Just need to make the transition over . . .

BTW: I just can't force myself to break the sticks BEFORE I need them. But I have pretty much been breaking with abandon AS I need them . . .

Studio-1-F
08-12-2010, 09:54 AM
--de-shackle me from useless compulsions that negatively impact my productivity, my creativity, and my happiness.
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Community/images/12-Aug-2010/12504-hooray.jpg

Potoma
08-12-2010, 10:30 AM
Okay, not to push the point :evil: , but you need to break them all before you paint. If you're in a painting groove, you don't need the distraction of stopping to break sticks or the stirring up your fears about breaking sticks. Put it all in your past. Strive to be able to grab and go.

miker107
08-12-2010, 11:22 AM
Oh, this is too funny. This situation mirrors my own experience. Having been away from pastels for 20+ years I recently got back into it and purchased a 50 set of Mount Visions. I started to experiment with them, but found the sticks too be a little large at times and felt it was getting in the way. I sat there for days resisting the urge to break them till I finally took them outdoors, removed the paper labels, and broke each and every one of them. I found out I didn't feel as bad as I thought I would. :lol:

Of course, I did find some of my MV's break on their own. I had a few right out of the box that would break into little shards. However, Karl was kind enough to send me a replacement stick for the few that fell apart.

Finvarra
08-12-2010, 12:57 PM
I didn't have much of a problem breaking my old, long thin Daler Rowneys, but my new Unisons being shorter and flatter - couldn't do it. I had a selection of them in a small plastic tray whilst working, and my cocker spaniel bounded up to say hallo and knocked it flying - result they all broke. Thank you Milo!

Cheers
Lesley

Anne-Marie
08-12-2010, 01:05 PM
:lol: Okay, you guys are really cracking me up. :lol:

Studio 1-F: Thank you for the blue ribbon! My first!!!

Potoma: I will consider your suggestion. I kind of like breaking them as I go. They do give a satifying little **snap** don't they? :lol:

I know if I have broken a piece that I am using it. At the end of September I'm going to go on vacation and I've decided that that is one of the ways I'm going to determine what goes into my backpack-sized Heilmann box: the broken ones first, because I tend to use them. Then I'll pick and choose according to fancy or what I anticipate might go with the landscape.

It's also true that they don't fit back into the original box as well after they are broken (until they are worn down a little more) Since I like the sharp line that freshly broken pastels offer, I don't want to dull them by squeezing them in together. This will become a non-problem as I shift pieces to my Heilmann box, and also if I end up getting studio boxes for my pastels (rather than use the manufacturer's boxes) But I do think the biggest hurdle--the compulsive once--has been leapt, and so it's a relief.

Mike: That's very nice that Karl did that for you. I have read very good things about his character and that is in keeping with it.

I do think . . . it's natural, yes? To not want to break something that is new? Can you imagine buying a new (expensive!) set of dishes and saying, well heck! and breaking them all in two?!!! The strange thing about pastels that makes them the exception is that the breaking makes them more functional. While it's tue that things like shoes and saddles are better when broken in, I don't know of anything else that has increased functionality when actually broken. . . .

RiJoRi
08-12-2010, 01:55 PM
Breaking Crayons Produces Creativity

"Class now take out your pretty crayons. Remember we want to keep them neat. Handle them carefully. We don't want to break them."

Across the United States school teachers continually tell their students this daily. But why? Are they trying to teach them orderliness or how to use some wonderful tools.

Keeping crayons neat, not peeling them (because children will not know the names of the colors), and not breaking them limits the creativity of the children and eventually diminishes their natural creativity as adults.

Crayons can be seen as metaphors for tools. Too often teachers, parents, even employers or friends and fellow managers or workers squelch natural creativeness by emphasizing neatness, orderliness, and limited, selected use of tools.

For instance, what are crayons? They are simply portions of colored wax. Why are they pointed? Because Binney & Smith, the Crayola™ manufacturers, thought they would look and work better if they were shaped like pencils? The pencil shape restricts the possibilities of line widths and shapes. Why do they have wrappers on them? Perhaps the manufacturers wanted the children to remember the colors name (in small print) and also to reinforce the brand name (in very large bold print)?
-- from: http://createwithalan.blogspot.com/2009/04/breaking-crayons-to-create.html

I came across this a few years ago, before it was on a blog. The author goes on to apply the crayon concept to many things in life...

Of course, if you are still terrified of breaking your own pastels, you could just buy half-sticks, and then apply them -- when you don't need thin lines -- holding them perpendicular to your paper, thereby keeping the edges sharp! :rolleyes:

--Rich

miker107
08-12-2010, 03:01 PM
Of course, if you are still terrified of breaking your own pastels, you could just buy half-sticks, and then apply them -- when you don't need thin lines -- holding them perpendicular to your paper, thereby keeping the edges sharp! :rolleyes:

--Rich[/quote]

Rich, I agree. I love my 20 piece set of half stick Senneliers I bought before the Mount Visions. They are the perfect size, and it's usually cheaper to buy a half stick set anyway.

Anne-Marie
08-12-2010, 04:16 PM
. . . my cocker spaniel bounded up to say hallo and knocked it flying - result they all broke. Thank you Milo!


Milo to the rescue!:lol:

RainySea
08-12-2010, 07:32 PM
Anne-Marie, congrats. . . I totally know where you are coming from. Actually, I took a class this week with Alicia and the first thing she did was break each pastel she took out of my box! :)

Paula Ford
08-12-2010, 10:20 PM
:lol: Good for you Anne-Marie! :clap: :clap: :clap: You'll find that the smaller pieces are much easier to work with and by the time you know it, you won't hesitate to break them in halves or thirds.

Anne-Marie
08-12-2010, 11:53 PM
Rainy--that would have given me a heart attack had she done that before I was "ready". :lol:

Thank you Paula--you're quite right: already, I'm breaking the Faber-Castells so that eventually they will be broke again (in a total of three pieces)

Re: Crayons as a metaphor for life: yes, it's so true. I had a really good friend from work that was extremely compulsive (the joke in our department is because our work is so very, very detailed oriented. they screen you for OCD before they hire you--you gotta have it or you're out!). Anyway, he would set everything so they would be at right angles on MY desk if he came over to talk. We were very close so I didn't care. Anyway. At some point we were talking about when we were kids. I told him: I have a hard time picturing you in kindergarten. I was thinking of my own kindergarten experience--muddy hands, muddy dresses, I was a total, uncontrollable whirling dervish at that age--and he looked at me puzzled. "I loved kindergarten," he said. "I would organize all the crayons," he said then, and it all made sense. Wasn't so hard to imagine him as a kindergartener after that--:lol:

allydoodle
08-13-2010, 02:39 AM
Some pastels I break, and some I just don't. Ludwigs should NEVER :eek: be broken :lol: :lol: , as I can use the short edge as if it were broken, or the longer edge if I need it - quite versatile, those Ludwigs!

Giraults can and should be broken, Nupastels as well. Rembrants, by all means should be broken, and the outsides sanded to remove that 'skin'! If a brand is already a half-stick, I don't break it on purpose. I can't bring myself to break my Unisons, they're pretty short already. I never break my Schminkes, as I only use them for detail at the end. I find them easier to hold if they stay intact. I've never broken my Art Spectrums, but if I need to I will. My Daler Rowneys I do break as needed. Now to my beautiful Mount Visions....... I probably should break them as they are quite big, but I haven't. I don't seem to have any trouble using them, so it just never ocurred to me to break them. I'll have to think about this some more.....

AnnMarie, I like your approach to only breaking what you need. It surely will make it easier to fill your Heilman box, you'll know what's important to you to bring, and then you can fill in the rest with what might be nice to also have :D .

MarinaG
08-13-2010, 09:47 AM
For me the turning point was purchasing a Heilman box. There was no way all my pastels were going to fit in there whole.

I had to break several sets of Rembrandt, my Nupastels but the real kicker was a wooden box of 100 Sennelier (landscape). I sat and snapped those babies one by one to fill up my Heilman box. I could have cried!

The funny thing was that after it was all done and assembled, the Heilman box looked like a beautiful rainbow of color and makes me smile just to look at it :) I kept all the remainders 1/2 to 2/3 sticks in their original boxes in my studio for replenishing purposes.

Potoma
08-13-2010, 01:18 PM
I break Ludwigs into three with a Xacto knife, however I generally score all breakees, then save the dust.

AM, your sorting means is quite clever. I withdraw my throw down. :wink2:

Lyta
08-13-2010, 03:09 PM
:lol: Can't we all relate? This thread made me smile, so thanks for posting it!

Today, I broke my cherished oil pastel collection; that's a big step because breaking pastels isn't as common with oil pastelists as it is with you guys. However, I discovered that the most useful oil pastel I had was one that had broken on its own - I used it on its side all the time - , and of course half sticks take up half as much space when I take the oil pastels out for plein air! Anyway, they're all broken now. :D

And yes, of course my various hard pastels are broken too, and they assured me they're feeling just fine. :heart:

Anne-Marie
08-13-2010, 08:00 PM
So funny, Chris, about not breaking the Ludwigs. I found that I really like them broken. They give a nice, crisp line then, and can be used for delicate work. I recall writing here in the forum that when I first tried out the Ludwig in the Dakota Sampler pack, it felt very clumsy in my fingers. I'm getting around that now (yay!) But i do think breaking them has helped.

I have not broken any of my original Unisons yet, even though I use them. They were my first real soft pastel set, and I am comfortable usng them and getting them to do what I want as-is.

Have you had the opportunity to use the plein aire set you got over Memorial Day weekend?

Potoma--:lol: thank you for withdrawing your throw down. That's a relief! :lol:

I do remember you saying that you scored your pastels before breaking. So far, there was one pastel (a Faber Castell) that broke where I hadn't anticipated, but all the other ones have been okay. I know a lot of people find saving dust to be useful. Because I am trying to work on being less compulsive about things (including saving things) I don't think I'm going to start that myself. Do you combine all the dust and then use it for grays, or????

Lyta--thank you for adding info about oil pastels--I hadn't thought of that. I didn't seem to have any problems using my oil pastels as-is, but maybe that's because I work fairly small--11" x 17" is as big as I've gotten so far. I can se how it would be useful to have them broke and to be able to use the sides, especially for bigger work.

allydoodle
08-13-2010, 10:25 PM
Hey Ann-Marie,

I have started to use those Ludwigs, as a matter of fact. I have a WIP posted a few weeks ago called 'Harmony with the Hills' that I've used them on, but I just haven't had the time to get back to it. Summer is a difficult time for me to get huge chunks of painting time. I have a 13 year old daughter, and we spend a lot of time together :heart: during the summer. I just may get to put some more time into it this week though. She got 'mad' when I told her I haven't had time to paint. She said she wanted me to do it! Good kid! So far, I really like the set, the colors are beautiful and soft, and their texture is wonderful! When I combine that set with the Intense Darks II I have, it's really nice. I also like the way they work with the Mount Visions. This painting is using both brands. I hope to post an update soon.:D Thanks for asking!

Studio-1-F
08-14-2010, 08:38 AM
Do you combine all the dust and then use it for grays, or????
Ummmm, or what else? See this example (http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showpost.php?p=7155385&postcount=11).

PS -- Anne-Marie, I am MIGHTY proud of you! :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: (Don't forget: Art & Fear, by David Bayles & Ted Orland (1993) (http://www.amazon.com/Art-Fear-Observations-Rewards-Artmaking/dp/0961454733))

Jan

Potoma
08-14-2010, 10:57 AM
I do combine dust. I just keep a mortar and pestle on my workspace and pile the new on old.

Of course, I don't need all that I make, so I take them to classes and paint outs to share. Just as it could be clutter to save the dust, it could be more clutter to store these batches of pastels which are all basically the same color. Actually, forming them more frequently would provide a bigger range and I should consider that.

When I make them, I put some pastel dust in an old ice cube tray, mix with a palette knife, and form up the side of the ice cube slots. They generally come out more Ludwig than Rembrandt.

We should do a pastel dust reborn pastel exchange around here!

chuas2
08-14-2010, 12:01 PM
Some pastels I break, and some I just don't. Ludwigs should NEVER :eek: be broken :lol: :lol: , as I can use the short edge as if it were broken, or the longer edge if I need it - quite versatile, those Ludwigs!

Now to my beautiful Mount Visions....... I probably should break them as they are quite big, but I haven't. I don't seem to have any trouble using them, so it just never ocurred to me to break them. I'll have to think about this some more.....
.

Interesting Chris...I find Ludwigs hard to break without losing a lot of the stick (even with an exacto score), but the shape is a little intimidating (probably because I have the world's shortest, stubbiest little fingers). My hubby just bought me the "Dianna Ponting set" of Ludwigs (60 incredible jewel tones) for my birthday, so I'm going to have to cross that bridge. :lol:

Now the Mt. Visions I think, lend themselves well to being broken, since they're a little harder than some. You can get beautiful sharp edges that hold on most supports.

Ann-Marie, think of the broken pieces like different sized brushes! Although I remain a little OCD (putting the broken pieces back in the slot with the "mother" piece, except in the case of accidents..such as knocking over a box of broken Giraults on the floor, wherein all the broken pieces ended up scattered together in a separate box), I think fastidiousness will only take you so far with pastel! :lol:
Chuas

allydoodle
08-14-2010, 01:31 PM
Chaus,

I know what you mean about the Ludwigs. When I first got them, my first thought was 'this is an odd size and shape, don't know if I'll like it'. The rest of my other pastels are different sizes, but all are round. (I'm not counting my Nupastels, as I hardly ever use them, for some reason.) Turns out, the Ludwig's shape and size work just fine for me. They give me another approach, so to speak, which I like. I often times hold them vertically, and just press on top of what is there (as a last detail), or while holding vertically, drag horizontally to make tree trunks, fence posts, shadows on buildings, you name it. By changing the direction of the stroke, it can give your painting more interest, at least that is what I have found. They are so nice and soft that I usually save them for my last layer, and I really like the colors. I may buy more, but I have to check the sets for duplicates, as I don't need two of anything (except the Ludwig eggplant 100, which I have 5 of!).

I know the Mount Visions do lend themselves to being broken (they are quite large), and some of mine are, but I haven't done it purposefully, a couple were broken in the box when I bought them (no problem, though). If I feel the need to break, I will with no hesitation, I just haven't yet.

SueNM
08-15-2010, 06:16 PM
Hi everybody. I've been taking a class here in Albuquerque through the local community college thing with a great instructor named Sharon Jensen. I think I've taken a summer session and maybe a spring session. Anyway, I was just appalled when at our very 1st class we were told to break our pastels in half at home as home work. It was so messy and seemed so disrespectful to the pastels.
I actually peel half the wrapper off first, then break it. I do make a color chart with the name/number for future reference, but I try to leave the number intact on the still wrapped 1/2, that I set aside for future use.
I don't break my Ludwigs or those non-stick types either.

mang
08-16-2010, 07:52 PM
Hi, I think broken and messy is definitely best, especially with labels off first; then all you need is pastel dust up to your elbows and you know you're winning!

Anne-Marie
08-17-2010, 12:13 AM
Chris--"Harmony with the Hills" is GORGEOUS!!! Love the velvety dark green that bisects the painting. The hills themselves are ghostly and wonderful--love the way that you were able to get such a sense of depth with your use of value and color there.

I also agree with you, both about being uncertain about the Ludwigs at first because of the size/shape, and also about using them to just press into the painting towards the end. I'm finding that with the velvety texture, I can do all kinds of things that I haven't been able to before. It's very exciting!

PS I am starting a chart of the Ludwig sets and what's-in-what that you might find helpful--I just posted that threat a few minutes ago. :)

Jan--Thank you for the kind words! You're a doll! :heart: Now let's see what picture you have for us . . . .:lol: :lol: :lol: Oh, my. Oh, no . . . . yes, you're right, I think I recognize what's in your hand all right :lol: :lol: Didn't realize you could PAINT with them, though!:lol:

Potoma--love the idea of a "dust exchange"! That's excellent! I have not been keeping my dust, but I am getting tempted, because some combinations have really been pretty . . .


Chuas2--um, no offence, but last I checked, I still hold the title of the World's Stubbiest Fingers! You are but a pretender to that thrown!:lol:

Seriously, I think the Ludwigs break very nicely. The super dark ones do seem a little more delicate, though, and last night I did have an "oops" and basically just broke off a splinter (which happened to be okay for what I was doing).

Thank you for the idea of pieces like different sizes of brushes! That is an excellent analogy and I think that's exactly the way I'm gonna look at it from now on. I have not been putting the little pieces back with the "mother" but may start to do so, especially as I paint and I do tend to get a lot of "little pieces". (Rather horrifyingly, I'm already half way through a couple of my Ludwigs, so saving the bits might both come in handy during an "emergency" and also help save a bit of $$$!)

I have not seen the Diana Ponting set ANYWHERE! Am most interested in what is in it/where one can purchase it!

PS I have the opposite experience as you--Ludwigs easy to break/Mount Visions sort of crumble upon breaking and so not so good to break . . .

PPS On second thought, there is enough room on my throne for a short-stubby fingered friend. I can scoot over a bit, if you want ;)

Sue--you know, I've read elsewhere of people having to break their sticks in class. I'm glad I broke mine (I am doing so with complete abandon now!) but I don't think I would have liked it at all to be forced to do so. I think it's one of those things that it's best to be left to realize: hmmmm, maybe they're right . . . . :)

(And before I do anything, I make a chart and make a vellum overlay of the name/number. That's part of what gave me the freedom, finally, to break the pastels, knowing I could always buy a new one if the break prooved to be too tramatic!)

Mang--I actually had "pastel dust up to my elbows" last night--and I think you're right!:lol:

Studio-1-F
08-17-2010, 09:58 AM
Hi everybody. I've been taking a class here in Albuquerque through the local community college thing with a great instructor named Sharon Jensen. I think I've taken a summer session and maybe a spring session. Sue, have you taken any workshops from our very own Deborah Secor (http://www.deborahchristensen.com/)? If I lived in The Q I'd be at her knee every day, soaking it all in.
Anyway, I was just appalled when at our very 1st class we were told to break our pastels in half at home as home work. It was so messy and seemed so disrespectful to the pastels. This is great ---> "disrespectful to the pastels". :heart: I assume you got past that. Bravo to your teacher! That was bold of her. Also the "so messy" part. I almost can't imagine a messier medium than pastels, except maybe fingerpaints (http://edfromct.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/finger_painting.jpg).
I actually peel half the wrapper off first, then break it. I do make a color chart with the name/number for future reference, but I try to leave the number intact on the still wrapped 1/2, that I set aside for future use. I don't break my Ludwigs or those non-stick types either.
Good idea, keeping a shred of the color in the wrapper, where you have the color data. What are "non-stick types"? Just wondering. Your teacher didn't have you break your Ludwigs too?

Jan

SueNM
08-17-2010, 01:14 PM
Hi Jan,
I meant the squarish, rectangular shaped pastels as opposed to the round stick kinds like Rembrandts.
About the workshops with Deborah Secor... I'm busy working (real Job) so much now hardly make my CNM classes anymore. Yes, would be a great thing to see/work with DS, but I'm also still too newbie. Would hate to be the cause of her giving up teaching people anymore, because I probably am a great taxer of one's patience!
I do have her 2 videos, and I bought the tip cards. But maybe some day! It is great to have all these great Pastelist right here in one's own back yard. If one only had the time!
Sorry Anne-Marie, didn't mean to hijack your thread.
Oh, we were told to unwrap and break so I thought it was only for the wrapped ones.:confused:

chuas2
08-17-2010, 02:44 PM
Chuas2--um, no offence, but last I checked, I still hold the title of the World's Stubbiest Fingers! You are but a pretender to that thrown!:lol:

I have not seen the Diana Ponting set ANYWHERE! Am most interested in what is in it/where one can purchase it!



Ok, my left forefinger from knuckle to tip is 3 inches. See if you can beat THAT! :lol:
Terry and his band of renown will put together a Dianna Ponting set if you ask for it, but it's not on his website. I happened to see it when I took her workshop. It's primarily darks, tending toward cool darks, but has some magnificent autumnal colors also. I'll try and take a decent photo of it. For Terry Ludwig darks, I also recommend what Karen (watergirl) did, the Intense Darks II. You'd be hard pressed to find such dense, saturated darks like this elsewhere!
Chuas

allydoodle
08-17-2010, 04:11 PM
For Terry Ludwig darks, I also recommend what Karen (watergirl) did, the Intense Darks II. You'd be hard pressed to find such dense, saturated darks like this elsewhere!


Most definitely! I now cannot live without them!

Anne-Marie
08-17-2010, 04:28 PM
Ok, my left forefinger from knuckle to tip is 3 inches. See if you can beat THAT! :lol:

Chuas

I can! I can!! From the webbing to the tip is LESS THAN 3 inches!!!!! I have proof, too--see the pix!

And so, I hereby proclaim myself the proud owner of the shortest, stubbiest finger of them all!!!! Oh, the glory! The glory!:lol: :lol: :lol:

Paula Ford
08-17-2010, 04:38 PM
:lol: Mine is less than 3" too :lol:

Potoma
08-17-2010, 06:40 PM
Mine is 2 5/8". Does the crown come with tribute?

chuas2
08-17-2010, 08:32 PM
HEY!! You're all destroying my self image! Paula, you too? :lol: :lol:

Anne-Marie
08-17-2010, 09:30 PM
oooooh, I think Potoma has us beat. :envy: And from the jaws of victory, she swipes my beloved crown. The trauma! :( The drama! :crying: The utter and devastating defeat! ;)

Potoma
08-17-2010, 11:00 PM
I wouldn't have even considered mine the shortest or stubbiest. I measured b/c there's a ruler right here.

Funny, b/c I am 5'5", so I guess it doesn't have anything to do with height. Guess this crown does make me a little taller though!

allydoodle
08-18-2010, 01:13 AM
Ann-Marie,

Thanks very much! Also, that chart you've started just might come in very handy for me. You are so nice to do it. I've been eyeing up the Richeson handmade 36 landscape set as my next acquisition, but I'm also thinking more Ludwigs would be nice too....... Oh, the decisions we have to make!

Anne-Marie
08-18-2010, 02:36 AM
Hi Chris! Glad to hear the chart may be helpful. You know what's funny is that I tend to say: Oh! the full set of Blick! THAT'S my next purchase! No, no, I want those half sticks of Schmincke (sp?) that's on sale at Dakota. No, the Ludwig Sunsets! No, the Unison Orange family! Make that the Unison Orange Family AND the 19-36 greens! OR: I could cash out my life savings, my retirement fund, and equity in my condo and buy a complete set of Roche in the adorable wooden chest!

But I don't REALLY know what I will buy until I do. Much depends on specials. Terry has free shipping, no taxes (for me), and 20% off the Salmagundi set right now, and he's the only one offering that set, so: I was sold! (And just in the nick of time, too: Blick has a 20% off thing going on right now!)

Now if only the Roches would go on clearance . . . at 98% off, I might be able to swing it!

saramathewson
08-18-2010, 12:10 PM
I did just make that purchase of the Schmincke 1/2 sticks but haven't received them yet. Also ordered the DT plein air thinform sticks. I haven't tried hers yet and thought this would be a good time to do so since they are on sale. I bought them instead of getting the polychromos set I was looking at. I realized I rarely use the harder sticks anyway. I have broken my Ludwigs in half and use them all the time all the way through the painting. also with MV I like to break them in thirds as that leaves nice chunks to work with. But, some are in half as i wasn't thinking and just broke them in half like I was doing with the rest of my pastels. Truth be told, I really didn't need any more pastels. I have more than enough and know this because I just moved and it was hard to find boxes to put them all in. But, I also never make color charts. I do buy lots of my pastels in sets but on occasion just buy them separate and buy colors that I think I will need the most. Or ones I know the name of and use all the time like the lightest denim color in the Great American line. I use it for skies near the horizon all the time.

Since I was making a purchase at Dakota, I also bought two bottles of spectrafix as I have been wanting it for a long time but didn't want to pay the shipping for just two bottles. And of course I bought some paper. 3 sheets of pastelmat and two of uart. I was going to buy some wallis but uart is less than wallis is on sale! And I have heard such good things about it. I actually haven't used it yet. My shipment hasn't come yet. Am waiting ever so impatiently. I feel a little guilty about the order, but I ordered enough so I have free shipping! It has been awhile since I made a pastel order. I am now single so am not paying for my boyfriends traveling all over kingdom come so I figure I deserved a little treat. It is so nice to be back in charge of my own finances. I would ask if I had enough for an art order and then would get the lecture that I really didn't need anything did I? Even though the break-up was agonizing and still is, it is nice to be able to make decisions just for myself without always asking. I mean it's my money right?!

AM, I am proud of you for breaking your pastels. Once I did this I found the halves so much more useful. I use the side of the sticks so much more than the points. And, I have some pieces in my guerilla boxes and some in my french easel drawer and some in boxes for the studio. One of these days I will get a big studio box like a dakota one. And either a dakota backpacker size or a small heilman to take out with me. I know it will simplify things. but using the guerilla boxes with my guerilla pochade works pretty well. I found I really only need three boxes but have four, so have an extra one for future use I guess.

I have even broken my half sticks in half for example my half stick set from Great American. They are about the size of a ludwig so I figured why not. It leaves more room for other colors in my plein air kit:)

Jan, I was living in Albuquerque before this last move to Mpls just a couple of weeks ago. I moved to be close to family again. I wanted to take classes with Deborah and had plans to but then i was too sick to and then Chris left me there stranded without a car so I knew I needed to move back home. I really wanted to take classes from her too. It just never worked out(lived there about 7 months). I was excited to be living there and thought I would be for the next IAPS conference, but guess I will just have to fly down for that! I would have stayed in the hotel anyway to be closer to everything and to be able to crash during the day if needed.

Anyway, AM keep up the good work of breaking them. Also I do save the dust. The stuff from my dust tray goes into one container but if I have bits and pieces of one color I put it in the color container it is close to like I have a red one and blue one and green one etc. Just different shades of them so when I do make pastels they will turn out interesting. Haven't actually made the pastels with them though.

Sara