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sarkana
06-06-2001, 08:32 AM
does anyone else have their oil-painting friends look down their nose at you when you explain that your medium is acrylics? as if you weren't a real painter? and does that ever make you question whether or not you're using the right medium, until you go home and make something so stunningly beautiful you want to cry?

who wants to vent?

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http://store.yahoo.com/sarkana

belladonna
06-06-2001, 03:47 PM
Hey there .... Oil painters are snobs??? I am an oil painter! (ducking to avoid tomatoes being thrown) I have never tried acrylics. I have a huge drawer of oils that people keep giving me soooooo why switch http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif I really don't know enough about acrylics to knock them and I wouldn't want to any way. (my mom painted in both oils and acrylics) someimes I feel like a dinosaur because I still use oils, and I know many artists that have switched from oils to acrylics. Please ..... Please lets have peace and harmony between mediums http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/angel.gif You'll get no negative waves from me http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

VictoriaS
06-06-2001, 05:22 PM
BUSTED!!

Snobs and snooping around the acrylics forum, too! (Makes them feel better about themselves!).

Just kidding, Belladonna. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/tongue.gif

mame
06-06-2001, 06:02 PM
Hey - whatever works for ya. I know a guy who has lost both his sense of taste and smell from long years of oil paint absorption into the skin. Another woman who literally breaks out in hives. They both currently use acrylics. Ya do what ya have to if you have to paint.

belladonna
06-06-2001, 09:35 PM
heheheh Well it was the title that dragged me in here *lol*

VictoriaS
06-07-2001, 12:23 AM
Hi, Sarkana:

Yes, I've noticed that oil painters seem to feel superior to acrylic painters. I don't have friends who paint, but I've seen it in the oil forum here: the question "Well, why don't you just use acrylics?" is an insult. I admit that I kind of felt that way myself before I tried acrylics. "Acrylics? Oh, please!"

I looked on your website hoping to see something you painted. Nothing there; can you post something? I did, however, enjoy your list of boutique acrylic colors, especially "baby sh*t brown." Made me laugh and wonder if anybody ever painted that.

Victoria

LarrySeiler
06-07-2001, 11:15 AM
Eeegads....without justifying what may sound like arrogance, I've mastered the use of acrylics in wildlife art competitions among my peers, yet at the moment am having most fun and growth with oils.

That must just make me confused! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/confused.gif

I have seen in the marketplace however, a very real underlying belief that oils have "greater value!" This I believe is related to the archival history of tradition.

I've developed a technique with acrylics that has stumped a good many gallery owners in that the finished product (done in 1/4th the time not having to wait for drying and varnishing), appears oil-like. In fact, a high traffic reputable gallery I was in in the Minneapolis area Mall of America had put "oil" on my title tag. When I pointed out the error, the countenance of the owner fell like a star from heaven. "Oooh..."

Well...the obvious disappointment was that this person knew that the painting would now be harder to impress upon collectors, thus harder to sell.

Sorry folks, but one problem with respect is that it has to have (according to human nature) some history behind it. Since we are living it in the present...we do not have the luxury of history to weigh our opinions. That will be left to the convenience of future generations. Just seems to be the way it is!

What's goofy though, is how the talent to make or craft an equally good image in acrylic seems to be missed by many that are impressed with an image in oil. Somehow the anatomy, rules of composition, sense of color, drama of lighting are less than noteworthy if the artist uses something other than oils.

I'm betting...that given the opportunity to present acrylics and their unique advantages to the masters of yesteryear...we would be surprised to see many of them using them over oils. However...they would have been receiving the same low end of the stick as you guys here! So...let it be like water off a duck's back! *shrug

Larry Seiler

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The "Artsmentor"
http://www.artsmentor.org

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

Lunachild
06-07-2001, 11:38 AM
I think it really just stems from the fact oils is much trickier to use, and requires a lot more patience. I know incredible artists that can paint like Gods when using other mediums, but when they pick up oils, they feel much more apprehensive, and they marvel at the intensity of the colors and and buttery consistency that is unique to oils. Overall, it's just a much more refined medium. But, this is only about the MEDIUM, not the ARTIST. I think if your work is amazing, no one really cares what medium you use. A well-rounded artist should be able to produce incredible works with kiddy crayons. . .. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif

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www.arcanum.net/~lunachild (http://www.arcanum.net/~lunachild)

LDianeJohnson
06-07-2001, 11:50 AM
The oil/acrylic "controversy" is a bit like PC/Mac, engineers/architects...

I have used both, love both, and have experienced painters of either ilk extoll the virtues of each.

And like Larry, it is wonderful to see the label "oil" mistakingly placed on one of my paintings when it is an acrylic and be able to say that it is not an oil painting. This subtly gives even more credibility and perceived "value" to acrylic works.

When I teach workshops 80% of the attendees use oil, 20% watercolor or pastel. I generally use acrylic on the road and for demos, unless doing a workshop specifically in soft pastel or oil. I have committed to using acrylic and love it. I have no problem now with whatever anyone thinks about what I use and it really offers opportunities for some good dialog.

Larry is right about acrylic not yet having a track-record compared to oil. Oil is the mainstay of the art world and will be for a long time yet to come. However, artists and illustrators are using so many different media now that I think it is becoming a non-issue.

And, I find that collectors that already own many oil paintings are seeking other art to purchase, i.e. works on paper, mixed-media, and acrylic, etc., to add for variety in their collections.

I remember 20 years ago when I began painting in pastel. Oil ruled. But, even though pastel has been around for hundreds of years, is being rediscovered and sought after by the public on a large scale these days.

I am of the mind that it's just like anything else. Acceptance. Let each artist paint the way they wish with what they wish, giving equal and due respect for each other's skills and choices. There is room for everyone and every medium. One is not better than any other. It is what is done with the talent and tools that counts.

My little 2 cents http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

Diane


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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
2001/2002 Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

LDianeJohnson
06-07-2001, 11:54 AM
P.S. I got of the central issue...

"Oil painters" are not snobs. People are snobs...it's called "pride". I have met few snobs in my time, but they are in every field and walk of life, not just in one area.

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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
2001/2002 Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

carly
06-07-2001, 01:02 PM
Carly the oil painter speaks to Carly the acrylic painter...."I see you're using that second rate medium again! How can you call yourself an artist and paint with acry....aarrrgggghhh!"

....as Carly the acrylic duck smiles and gessoes out the offending noise from that snobbish oily duck! Acrylics! fastest dry in the south!

Anyone want a painting of "Oily Duck Silenced"??

carly

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"Everything is not art and Art is not everything, but it comes close."....carly

ivan1
06-07-2001, 01:49 PM
This has been an interesting thread for me. I started painting only 3 months ago in oils (5 paintings) Because of health concerns I have started playing with acrylics. Yes there is an adjustment to make, but as soon as I told myself not to compare the two methods, and just paint, things went well.

TMoore
06-07-2001, 01:50 PM
Actually, I think Acrylics is gaining enough of a voice to be heard (even if in this generation it is a whisper) by the oil painters. If it helps to put in perspective, think of the task the Colored Pencil artists have to grapple with. Not only is it a very new medium but everyone thinks of grade school - yet the medium (if good pencils are used) produces astounding works.

[This message has been edited by TMoore (edited June 07, 2001).]

GC
06-07-2001, 02:30 PM
Originally posted by Artistry:
P.S. I got of the central issue...

"Oil painters" are not snobs. People are snobs...it's called "pride". I have met few snobs in my time, but they are in every field and walk of life, not just in one area.


I agree with the above!

Ginette

Bruce Newman
06-07-2001, 04:20 PM
Originally posted by ivan1:
...Yes there is an adjustment to make, but as soon as I told myself not to compare the two methods, and just paint, things went well.

This is the way I see it as well. As a new painter, I don't have a very strong opinion on these things and mostly just keep my ears open and my mouth shut. I have had the impression that some people do see oil painting as "real" painting, to the point that a few local artists have actually said to me, "Oh, acrylics. Just wait 'til I get you into oils."

I've basically just said that I bet that would be interesting, but I have no desire at this point to try them. Although, I would like to try lots of things in time, right now I need to learn more about painting with acrylics...and then more...and more. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif

From my very limited knowledge of oils, I'm not keen on all the problems associated with fumes but very interested in the buttery consistency and the way you can push them around on your painting.

For what it's worth, my very first painting was a foggy river scene and it was mistakenly referred to as an oil by a critic. After I corrected him, he got his nose right in there and had a close look. http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/smile.gif That struck me as funny at the time.

Bruce


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http://go.to/bruce_newman

mame
06-07-2001, 05:01 PM
I work in both and sometimes if I don't get it written into the inventory immediately, I forget which it is. Maybe just my particular way of working but I can't tell the difference visually after the fact. I haven't had the problem with perception/comparison in the marketplace.

LarrySeiler
06-08-2001, 12:01 AM
By default of age...one can learn to be effectual and understanding in a good number of mediums. Sargent was masterful with both oils and watercolors, for example.

True..oil is more "technical" but that is simply more processes to understand and work thru. As for hhmmm, "trickier"...I see many many acrylic painters trying to paint realistically that are missing several steps to becoming actually effectual.

For example...acrylics allows a linear detailing which is more immediate. So, if a person were painting a bird, they might stop after all the details were painted in, yet the thing looks like a chunk of wood. Birds are also "soft"...and that's one of their realistic qualities. So, though acrylics are "faster" they have to be labored over a great deal of time using many many layers of transparent washes- utilizing understanding of warm or cool colors, bringing certain details back out...pushing others in which will then eventually remedy this and say "detailed AND soft."

This is a "technique"...and it is "tricky"
For oil painters, it takes much less time to say "soft" with their medium. So, its half a dozen of one thing, and another.

There are mediums acrylic painters can learn to use which are "tricky" and can leave impasto effects which appear quite oil-like.

Its all a matter of learning.

I've known oil painters (and myself personally) whom after painting in oils tried acrylics...only to throw their brushes out their room's door and possibly injure anyone walking by because they could not handle the drying nature. But, there are "tricks" to mastering this. One of the tricks is learning to master yourself and your own impatience!

by the same token, I've known acrylic painters trying to paint in oils that wish there were a magic hair blower they could hold in their hand and make oils dry "now!"

Thus...as far as painting like "gods" its a matter of understanding your medium, and mastering it. Its a matter of taking on a new medium and committing yourself to master that as well.

As far as others not caring about the medium one uses, I wish that were true in the galleries and among collectors. If you have an already established name and people want a piece of you..then it will matter less for sure. Since I paint with oils, acrylics and watercolors....use my name and rep to market all three...I have encountered these prejudices people here are speaking of.

I have had a good number of galleries look at my work and either a: assumed they were all oils (because they had made the assumption I was good; oils are good; therefore "he paints in oils!") or b: say, "yes...your acrylics are very nice, but do you have any oils?"

The bias does exist....but, eventually, excellence in any medium will make its impression, and persistence will pay off.

Larry


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The "Artsmentor" http://www.artsmentor.org

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

[This message has been edited by lseiler (edited June 07, 2001).]

LarrySeiler
06-08-2001, 12:08 AM
You are right on about that Diane! It reminds me of an old axiom that says, "the heart of the problem, is the problem of the heart!"

It is essentially a pride problem, one of arrogance and self-exhaltation at the expense of others. Very self-loving.

Larry

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The "Artsmentor"
http://www.artsmentor.org

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

ivan1
06-08-2001, 08:34 AM
I am actually quite surprised by this whole discussion. I'm a chemist who always thought that artsy type people were very loosey goosey, and followed no rules. This is one of the reasons I took up painting, as I have spent most of my life doing very detailed meticulous work in the lab, and wanted something I could go a little wild with. Slapping paint on a canvas sounded like a great idea. Now I find that there are many artists who are quite vocal about what is the right way to do things. Although I realize there are many teqniques to learn in painting , I also think that being overly concerned with them takes something away from the ability to create. My first painting( in Oil) was done with no knowledge of painting at all. I bought some paints and canvas and away I went. After that I began investigating "proper" technique. I think my first painting is my best.
Of course I am not trying to make a living out or this, so am not concerned at all with longevity of paintings etc.

sarkana
06-08-2001, 10:44 AM
this has been a great discussion! thanks!

i'm actually a bit of a jumpsider myself. after using acrylics for more than 7 years, i switched to oils (partly because i thought that's what *serious* artists do). i had a huge learning curve to overcome! my acrylics technique was so tight and so based on paints drying times that i had a lot to learn about handling oils. but then i started making the acrylics at my store and got into all the things you can do with acrylic paint that are impossible with oils. it's not that hard to make an acrylic painting look like it was done with oil, but making an oil look like it was done with acrylics is almost impossible.

with acrylics, i am always experimenting with new formulas and making things shiny or thicker or more liquid or iridescent. my acrylic customers eat it up! they love it when i change something. if i change even the packaging of the oil paint my oil painting customers have conniption fits. but i think part of that has to do with the fact that painting in oils is quite a bit more expensive.

another difference: oil painters seem in general to be more concerned about the makeup and chemical composition of their paints. many of them even make their own. i have not encountered this kind of enthusiasm about the paint itself in acrylic painters. anyone want to prove me wrong?

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http://store.yahoo.com/sarkana

LarrySeiler
06-09-2001, 12:05 AM
concerned about the makeup and chemical composition of their paints. many of them even make their own. i have not encountered this kind of enthusiasm about the paint itself in acrylic painters. anyone want to prove me wrong

I think its great Sarkana that you are being innovative with acrylics. Isn't that the triumph of the creative human spirit! Very cool.

You know...if I buy a used car, only 5-6 years of age, I have a used car. If a buy a car that's 24 years old...I start thinking, "heh...this is a classic now!" Then, I start thinking about the possibility of some body work, maybe a overhaul with the engine, maybe a pair of dice dangling from the mirror.

ITs human nature to want to feel connectedness. For sure...this is one of the neat things that oil paints have, as does egg tempera, etc; It has a history.

Some I see are concerned about this the way some veterans are with past battles in war. You can be well read, a patriot. You can also be a gun collector, collect war uniform insignias...and find friends to argue war strategies. Again...that's human nature.

Now...with painting, my personal opinion is that a good and decent image does not require the knit picking jot and tittle of classical near-lost tricks and secrets of the masters. I'm glad some do that, in the way I'm glad some preserve old cars. However, I simply want to go from here to there....and any car that runs will accomplish that for me.

So, in essence I'm suggesting there is a love beyond simply painting that goes on here. A love with nostalgia. A connection to the past. Isn't it wonderful that some are this way too? I mean, we get to see more and more the way it used to be done.

However...when I'm painting a subject, the subject has my attention, and the purpose is to give my aesthetic impression/reaction of it. There is a love for painting, and a love affair over painting. There can be a combination of both to be sure.

So...without such a history with acrylics, we are left to be more concerned with the image and the creative process. While oil painters cling to their traditions to champion their superiority...others could champion acrylics for breaking the chains of the technical to allow the artist freedom to focus on his art and less on his craft.

There is nothing to argue with you here really. That would be like saying restoring old cars is easy.

Oil paintings appear different from one another because there are many ways of applications. Applications with a long history.

Acrylics are yet to be as explored and experimented with to that extent, but polymers give great potential.

Larry

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The "Artsmentor"
http://www.artsmentor.org

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

vonorloff
06-09-2001, 04:30 PM
So, in essence I'm suggesting there is a love beyond simply painting that goes on here. A love with nostalgia. A connection to the past. Isn't it wonderful that some are this way too? I mean, we get to see more and more the way it used to be done.

However...when I'm painting a subject, the subject has my attention, and the purpose is to give my aesthetic impression/reaction of it. There is a love for painting, and a love affair over painting. There can be a combination of both to be sure.

So...without such a history with acrylics, we are left to be more concerned with the image and the creative process. While oil painters cling to their traditions to champion their superiority...others could champion acrylics for breaking the chains of the technical to allow the artist freedom to focus on his art and less on his craft.

There is nothing to argue with you here really. That would be like saying restoring old cars is easy.

Oil paintings appear different from one another because there are many ways of applications. Applications with a long history.

Acrylics are yet to be as explored and experimented with to that extent, but polymers give great potential.

Larry

[/B][/QUOTE]

Larry
You know what? You're a writer as much or more than a painter. I am always heartened by your posts ... they are concise and eloquent. You seem to put a lot of effort and energy into your comments..... I just want you to know that someone appreciates your straight shooting clarity.
Von

Keith Russell
06-09-2001, 11:48 PM
Greetings:

If you think oil painters are snobs toward acrylic painters, you should see how most painters--in any media--react to airbrush artists, especially those few of us who are brave (stupid) enough to call our work 'fine' art!

The wierd thing is, none of the artists I've met at art shows, or science fiction conventions, have ever criticized my work for being painted with airbrush, painted on illustration board, framed behind glass, etc. None of them have even criticized my subject matter, futuristic, science-fictioney wierd stuff...

One of my instructors in college gave me what might be the best piece of advice I've heard; "Never apologize for your work."

I take my work seriously, and price it accordingly, and thus those around me take it seriously, too.

I have taken this a step farther. I don't apologize for my media, my materials, my techniques, or my subject matter, either.

If we don't know (or fail to learn) how to champion our own work, and the means we used to create it, who will?

Keith.

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

LarrySeiler
06-11-2001, 07:49 PM
Well thanks Von....I appreciate your comment here sincerely!

I've been working on and intending to put together a book for years...and whenever I get comments like yours my wife clears her throat. (so we won't tell her, okay?).

Seriously though, I am putting out a couple of future books on CD rom, how-to demo's, thoughts, etc; with options for users to just take in the demo's or try to read thru my ramblings and enter that strange aesthetic domain of the artist's mind. Look out! http://www.wetcanvas.com/ubb/wink.gif

Larry

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Larry Seiler NAPPAP
The "Artsmentor"
http://www.artsmentor.org

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

LarrySeiler
06-11-2001, 07:54 PM
If we don't know (or fail to learn) how to champion our own work, and the means we used to create it, who will? -Keith

well stated Keith.

At one high school I taught at, I used to teach air brushing. Had four stations. As things develop here, I may again offer that option and possibility. Its great fun, and its coming together have moments that are quite mesmerizing! All mediums aside, surely one's artistic vision is key, and the intention realized a great sense of aesthetic satisfaction!

Larry


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Larry Seiler NAPPAP
The "Artsmentor"
http://www.artsmentor.org

"Painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!" Edgar Degas

Keith Russell
06-13-2001, 12:26 AM
Larry:

I'm giving demonstration/seminar in DeSoto Kansas, put on by my current gallery, on the 22nd of this month.

I used to teach year-round at a juniour college here, but it took too much time away from my painting.

I still enjoy it, though, and am looking forward to a one-evening mini-class.

Keith.

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

Studio224
06-19-2001, 06:03 AM
Originally posted by Keith Russell
Greetings:

If you think oil painters are snobs toward acrylic painters, you should see how most painters--in any media--react to airbrush artists, especially those few of us who are brave (stupid) enough to call our work 'fine' art!

The wierd thing is, none of the artists I've met at art shows, or science fiction conventions, have ever criticized my work for being painted with airbrush, painted on illustration board, framed behind glass, etc. None of them have even criticized my subject matter, futuristic, science-fictioney wierd stuff...

One of my instructors in college gave me what might be the best piece of advice I've heard; "Never apologize for your work."

I take my work seriously, and price it accordingly, and thus those around me take it seriously, too.

I have taken this a step farther. I don't apologize for my media, my materials, my techniques, or my subject matter, either.

If we don't know (or fail to learn) how to champion our own work, and the means we used to create it, who will?

Keith.

------------------
Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

When I started reading this thread, I thought and what about watercolorists? And pencil artists? I am a beginner watercolorist and I have heard some unpleasant remarks...

But now that i have arrived at the end of the thread, I feel conforted by what Keith instructor told him, and by the step further that Keith has taken. I don't apologize either, if I don't give value to my work, who will? That's my work, and I have a lot to learn, to improve, I'll always have to improve but... I will never apologize...

Anne-Claire

sarkana
06-19-2001, 09:03 AM
i completely agree with the last poster: don't even bother justifying your medium. if people bring you down, they are just being all junior-high-school about it. right now i'm making these collage pieces with hardware store paint chips! certainly not employing any old master techniques there (unless leonardo also invented a glue stick he kept secret until this century).

point taken about watercolorists and those working in colored pencil (pencillists?). you're definitely working against some negative energy. and i for one know that watercolor is probably the most rigorous form of painting!

but i just authored this topic to get a discussion going, to acknowledge the fact that prejudices against various media exist and potentially influence the artistic choices we make. when we are expressing ourselves artistically, we are also trying to create something that "looks like a painting" on some level.

Keith Russell
06-19-2001, 03:39 PM
Greetings:

Prejudices exist against nearly everthing. You can always find someone (and consider yourself lucky if it is only one person) who doesn't like your particular choice of media, techniques, subject, style--or, who simply doesn't like you!

I once had an artist look at my work, and his response was 'I don't know anything about airbrush; I'm not qualified to say anything about it'. That was all he'd say.

I found this rather strange. I mean, a painting is a painting, the media is merely the means to the end. I wasn't asking him to evluate my technique, I just wanted to know if he liked the image, what--if he had painted it--would he have done differently.

It took me a few minutes after he left to realize that this was his diplomatic way of telling me that the didn't really like my painting--that he wouldn't have cared for the image even if it had it been rendered in another media.

While I appreciated his tact, I would have appreciated an honest answer more. We could have at least continued talking about his reasons for not liking the piece. Instead, given what he said, the conversation was over.

Keith.

TeAnne
06-25-2001, 10:47 PM
I wouldn't call myself a snob. :evil: I just don't know how to use acrylic properly. Though I did buy some to learn folk art. I did enjoy that. :D I have more oils than acrylic though :evil:

Victor
07-01-2001, 05:28 PM
I've tried acrylics and couldn't manage them so I stick with oils its as simple as that but I do admire and respect all you acrylic painters out there....:):

domsanto
07-02-2001, 02:05 AM
I think you all know that watercolors are more difficult to master. hence, watercolorist are more skilled..lol..(running away)

mame
07-02-2001, 08:02 AM
I think you're right, Dom Demented. Especially annoying is that the tatoos wash right off in the shower.

I do wonder why so many folks just starting out begin with watercolor. It is THE most difficult medium to master.

Why do you think this is, Dom Devine?

domsanto
07-02-2001, 09:16 AM
Originally posted by mame:
I think you're right, Dom Demented. Especially annoying is that the tatoos wash right off in the shower.

I learned my lesson a couple years ago and stopped taking my watercolors in the shower with me. I now use a loofa instead.

I do wonder why so many folks just starting out begin with watercolor. It is THE most difficult medium to master.

Simplicity and easy clean up I suspect.

I just had to chime in on this issue because us watercolorist have been beaten down for so many years and told are medium wasn't worthy. Well, Im mad as hell and I'm not taking it anymore :D

Now if 99.9 percent of watercolorists would stop painting flowers we might be taken seriously. On second thought I like being unique, so keep those flowers coming.

timelady
07-06-2001, 09:24 AM
Originally posted by VictoriaS
the question "Well, why don't you just use acrylics?"

haha, I think that response was in a discussion I took part in. :) I use liquin as my medium in oils (it's an alkyd) and some oil painters think it's like painting with plastic anyway, hence removing any benefit of working with an historically "stable" method like oils. Bah!

I've seen some gorgeous work in acrylics, although it is true that the market price still is biased towards oils. I don't really like the feel of acrylics but use them occassionally because of the drying time. They're not better or worse, but different. That's my opinion anyways. :) I can't achieve in acrylic what I can in oils and have the upmost respect for those who can! It's my ability that's lacking, not the medium.

Tina.

P.S. I agree about watercolours being most difficult!
P.S.S. Macs are so WAY better than PCs. ;)

YLCIA
07-06-2001, 11:02 AM
I am new to the painting , I paint only for 2 years and even out of it, for 6 month I could not paint due to the recovery process after my spinal surgery. I have a couple of friends who consider themselfs very knowledgable in art and they collect art and travel a lot to different countries were they find theirs "finds"...

They like my paintings (at least they say so) but said that they would buy some gladly if... it would be oil. And do I mind to do it in the oil. Well , I do, be cause I am allergic to thinners and have a headacke being around the oils for a while. And I think this is crazy. I collect paintings too ( if I can afford them) and to me the work is important not the medium.

Julia:)

sarkana
07-06-2001, 12:31 PM
we have been talking about liquin in the oils forum (alkyds thread) and how so many people have experienced yellowing in a very short time. has this happened to you? if not, how do you avoid it?

no doubt a lot of fine work has been done in acrylics. but i can also see from the perspective of the art market why an oil painting would be worth more. the materials that go into an oil painting are generally more costly! any thoughts on marketting acrylics as acrylics, better for their own sake?

i perosnally found that after painting in acrylics exclusively for many many years, it was the perfect training for alla prima painting in oils! but i still do acrylics, just for different things.

Rose Queen
07-06-2001, 12:41 PM
It sounds to me that the consensus of this group is that the work's more important than the medium. So how do we get Scott to change the description of the oil-painting forum that currently reads "The queen of mediums!"? :cat:



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Tiasa
03-31-2007, 09:56 AM
I think oil painters are just traditional. It is comforting to know you are using an established and accepted medium. Gosh, they may even like all the rules, especially the classical painters.

When I think of acrylic, I think modern, more free-wheeling, and more risk taking. Since you can create the same look with either one--and both are archival, it really doesn't matter. I view snobbish oil painters as just too conservative and conventional. They need a break a rule or two now and then! :p