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Sonia7373
05-25-2001, 03:57 PM
I have a question for you guys/gals. Acrylic is my medium of choice although I have delved into the oils realm a couple of times. I love the wet on wet effects you can create with oils and have had problems trying to do the same thing with Acrylics because of the quick drying time. So my question (and Larry, I am dying to hear your response) is how do you all feel about acrylic retarders? Larry, I also use Liquitex extender and love it and it even adds a few minutes of drying time to my work but not enough. All of my local contacts caution against the retarders although I have yet to receive a good reason why. Is it frowned upon, thought of as cheating, what? I did find one guy at my favorite art shop who mentioned liquitex Acrylic extender and said he uses it. Will it change the look of my painting that much? Dull it out? Any input would be appreciated. Thanks,
Sonia

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"Over a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

LDianeJohnson
05-25-2001, 05:21 PM
Sonia,

A couple of thoughts on retarders...

They are not bad if you use them as a retarder and not as any kind of extender for the paint. Use less than 15% retarder or you could experience the opposite problem...slow drying or even a "tacky" feel to the paint. Even if when eventually dries, it can pull away from the surface in come cases.

If you can get away without it, I recommend skipping it altogether. If you are in a very dry climate, test a few different brands and amounts to see which is most effective for you.

Diane

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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
2001/2002 Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

Sonia7373
05-30-2001, 10:43 AM
Thanks so much. Very helpful.
sonia

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"Over a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

sarkana
06-06-2001, 08:40 AM
retarders work by altering the paint film that forms naturally and prevents the water from evaporating out of the paint as quickly. a little retarder is nt going to hurt anyone, but i find that i don't like what it does to my paint texture. i tend to not mix it directly into the paint. here are some techniques i have used to good effect:

1) get a spray bottle that mists and fill it with water. add some retarder to the water. spray your painting and your palette frequently. this will also slow evaporation and doesnt thin your paint.

2) when areas of your painting have dried before you want them to, paint over them with a high-quality matte or gloss medium. you can do some tranparent wet-in-wet-like techniques that way.

3) work thickly! this is the greatest thing about acrylic painting to me, because painting thickly in oils is so very wrong. but you can pile the stuff on your canvas and even build up sculptural areas without fear of reprisal.

hope this helps!

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http://store.yahoo.com/sarkana

LDianeJohnson
06-07-2001, 11:24 AM
sarkana,

Great tip on adding a bit of retarder to the spray bottle of water!

Thanks,
Diane

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L. Diane Johnson (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/) NAPA, PSA
2001/2002 Plein Air Workshops (http://www.LDianeJohnson.com/workshops/)

Sonia7373
06-09-2001, 08:08 PM
Sarkana

Thank you for the great ideas. I am definitely going to try the retarder in the spray bottle. I must confess, I do tend to be a little shy with the paint. Will try a different approach. Thanks so much.

Sonia

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"Over a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

Keith Russell
06-09-2001, 09:49 PM
Greetings:

I just got some information from Golden the other day, on their new 'Acrylic Glazing Liquid'.

They claim that the stuff does slow the drying time of acrylic paints enough that some 'oil-painting-like-effects' are possible with acrylics.

But, I left the booklet at Synthetic Sky Studios East.

I'll retrieve it Monday night, and get back to everyone with more info...

Keith.

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Keith Russell
Synthetic Sky Studios
Science Fiction Fine Art
[email protected]
artkc.com/russelk.htm

Leaflin
06-18-2001, 02:28 PM
I ordered a bottle of Acrylic Glazing Liquid but have not used it yet.
It is a mixture of acrylic polymers, retarder and water, and also has Acrylic flow release in it.
It says to expect about 30 to 45 minutes working time.
You can mix it 1:1 with most colours and still remain opaque.
I had a choice of gloss or satin.
Golden has a great site. With lots of information on this and other 'stuff' :)

www.goldenpaints.com

sarkana
06-19-2001, 09:11 AM
i for one have found that 30-45 minutes is a *very* generous estimate. maybe due to my own brooklyn-bound climactic conditions? i;m curious about others experiencing this. i love golden's products in general though, they kick *ss.

it seems strange to me that something called a "glazing" additive would give a longer open time, since that is the opposite of what i would want in an oil-based glazing medium.